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Full text of "American archives : consisting of a collection of authentick records, state papers, debates, and letters and other notices of publick affairs, the whole forming a documentary history of the origin and progress of the North American colonies; of the causes and accomplishment of the American revolution; and of the Constitution of government for the United States, to the final ratification thereof. In six series ..."

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http://archive.org/details/americanarchives01forcuoft 


iV 


6CA"i<- 


^merican  ^rc|)itie0: 


CONSISTING  OF 


A  COLLECTION  OF  AUTHENTICK  RECORDS,  STATE  PAPERS,  DEBATES,  AND  LETTERS  AND 

OTHER  NOTICES  OF  PUBLICK  AFFAIRS, 


THE  WHOLE  FORMING 


A  DOCUMENTARY  HISTORY 


OF 


THE  ORIGIN  AND  PROGRESS  OF  THE  NORTH  AMERICAN  COLONIES; 


CAUSES  AND  ACCOMPLISHMENT  OF  THE  AMERICAN  REVOLUTION 


AND    OF 


THE  CONSTITUTION  OF  GOVERNMENT  FOR  THE  UNITED  STATES, 


THE  FINAL  RATIFICATION  THEREOF. 


IN  SIX   SERIES. 


FIRST  SERIES. 

From  the  Dirscovery  and  Settlement  of  the  North  American 
G)lonies,  t6  the  Revolution  in  Eng-land,  in  1688. 

4  SECOND  SERIES. 

From  the  Revolution  in  England,  in  1688,  to  the  Cession  of 
Canada  to  Great  Britain,  by  the  Treaty  at  Paris,  in  1763. 

THIRD  SERIES. 

From  the  Cession  of  Canada,  in  1763,  to  the  King's  Mes- 
sage to  Parliament,  of  March  7th,  1774,  on  the  Proceed- 
ings in  North  America. 


FOURTH  SERIES. 

From  the  King's  Message,  of  March  7th,  1774,  to  the  Decla- 
ration of  Independence,  by  the  United  States,  in  1776. 

FIFTH  SERIES. 

From  the  Declaration  of  Independence,  in  1776,  to  the  De- 
finitive Treaty  of  Peace  with  Great  Britain,  in  1783. 

SIXTH  SERIES. 

From  the  Treaty  of  Peace,  in  1783,  to  the  final  ratification 
of  the  Constitution  of  Government  for  the  United  States, 
proposed  by  the  Convention,  held  at  Philadelphia,  in  1787. 


PREPARED  AND  PUBLISHED  UNDER  AUTHORITY  OF  AN  ACT  OF  CONGRESS. 


i4i 


^ 

^ 


AMERICAN  AR€HITE8t 


dPourtj)  giertcs. 


CONTAINING 


A  DOCUMENTARY  HISTORY 


OF 


THE  ENGLISH  COLONIES  IN  NORTH  AMERICA, 


FKOM 


THE  KING'S  MESSAGE  TO  PARLIAMENT,  OF  MARCH  7,  1774, 


TO 


THE  DECLARATION  OF  INDEPENDENCE 


BY 


THE  UNITED  STATES. 


VOLUME  I. 


PUBLISHED  BY  M.  ST.  CLAIR  CLARKE  AND  PETER  FORCE, 
UNDER    At;THOBlTY   OF    AN    ACT    OF    CONGRESS,    PASSED    ON    THE    SECOND    OF    MARCH,    1833. 


«ie<tmjJJ>e 


WASHINGTON,  DECEMBER,  1837. 


«l^« 


£ 

m 


PEEFACE 


We  noAv  submit  to  the  People  of  the  United  Stales,  the  first  fruits  of  our  long 
and  arduous  lahoui'S.  We  oflier  the  present  Volume  as  a  specimen  of  tlie  manner  in 
Mhich  our  Work  will  he  accomplished.  The  undertaking  in  which  we  have  embarked 
is,  emphatically,  a  J^ational  one :  National  in  its  scope  and  object,  its  end  and  aim. 

The  tendency  of  the  present  age  has  been  justly  and  philosophically  designated  as 
historick.  At  no  former  period  of  the  world  has  this  characteristick  been  so  strikingly 
manifested.  The  learning,  the  industry,  and  the  sagacity  of  the  most  profound  intellects 
have  been  devoted  in  exploring  the  deepest  recesses,  and  in  gathering  the  most  widely 
scattered  rays,  for  the  purpose  of  pouring  their  concentrated  lights  upon  the  history 
of  the  past.  The  Annals  of  the  remotest  ages,  and  the  most  distant  countries,  have 
been  examined  with  equal  diligence  and  learning,  and  new  and  valuable  lights  have 
been  thrown  even  upon  the  antiquities  of  Egypt,  of  Greece,  and  of  Borne. 

The  same  tendency  has  been  exhibited  in  developing  the  early  history  of  existing 
Nations.  Ancient  records  have  been  disinterred  from  tlie  dust  of  ages,  the  most 
obscure  receptacles  of  historick  materials  have  been  explored,  almost  obliterated  records 
have  been  restored,  scattered  documents  have  been  collected,  and  forgotten  writers  have 
been  republished.  A  combined  and  vigorous  effort  appears  to  be  making,  throughout 
tlie  civilized  Avorld,  together,  to  preserve  and  to  scrutinize  all  the  memorials  w  Inch  can 
rescue  the  history  of  the  past  from  the  obscurity  in  which  time  has  en^ eloped  them. 

Nor  has  this  important  subject  been  allowed  to  depend,  exclusively,  upon  individual 
means  and  private  enterprise.  In  England,  and  in  France  especially,  the  Government 
has  long  since  perceived  and  recognized  the  truth,  that  the  national  character  and  the 
national  interests,  are  intimately  connected  Avith  the  success  of  these  undertakings.  'I'he 
Publick  Offices  have  been  laid  open  and  their  rich  treasures  submitted  to  the  inspection 
of  the  inquirer  after  historick  truth.  With  a  liberality  deserving  of  the  highest  com- 
mendation, this  privilege  has  been  extended  as  well  to  foreigners  as  to  natives,  and 
Brequigny  and  Von  lieaumer  aie  not  the  only  instances  in  which  the  records  of  one 
Nation  have  been  employed  by  the  historian  of  another.  This  liberty  has,  in  several 
instances,  been  accorded  to  our  own  citizens,  and  the  Publick  Offices  in  London  have 
been  opened,  and  Documents  allowed  to  be  transcribed,  for  the  purpose  of  verifying  the 
general  history  of  the  United  States. 

Nor  has  this  publick  interest  been  confined  within  these  limits.  Large  pecuniary 
expeuditm'es  have  been  made  with  the  view  to  promote  these  objects,  and  to  aid  in  publi- 
cations for  the  completion  of  w  hich  the  resources  of  individuals  were  inadequate.  In  some 
instances  Governments  have,  themselves,  undertaken  the  work,  and  by  the  instrumentality 
of  their  own  agents,  and  the  employment  of  their  own  means,  have  laboured  in  the  dis- 
semination of  such  information  as  was  calculated  to  illustrate  their  past  history.  The 
Record  Commission  of  England,  and  that  oi-ganized  in  France,  under  the  supervision  of 
the  Minister  of  Publick  Instruction,  in  conformity  with  the  recommendation  of  31.  Gni- 
zot,  are  too  well  known  to  require  more  than  this  general  allusion  to  them. 

If  in  Europe  there  exist  sufficient  motives  to  prompt  to  such  undertakings,  how  infi- 
nitely more  weiglity  and  more  efficient  ought  they  to  be  among  us.  These  inquiries,  ori- 
ginating in  the  liberal  and  inquisitive  cliaracter  of  the  age,  may  be  expected  to  be  most 
zealously  pursued  in  those  countries  where  freedom  prevails.  Designed,  as  they  are,  to 
exhibit  the  fundamental  principles  of  government,  tlie^^  might  naturally  be  expected  to  be 
the  most  warmly  cherished,  where  free  institutions  exist.  Independently  of  this,  all  our 
historical  memorials  are  of  comparati>  ely  recent  date,  they  are  written  in  a  language  fa- 
miliar to  all,  they  tend  to  illustrate  existing  institutions,  and  a  bistorj^  w  hich  still  retains  all 
its  personal  interest.  A  complete  collection  of  the  materials  for  a  history  of  this  country 
would  not  only  be  a  proud  monument  to  the  memory  of  our  ancestors,  w  hose  deeds  they 
commemorate  and  whose  opinions  they  embody,  but  would  serve  as  an  invaluable  guide 
to  us  and  to  our  posterity,  by  exhibiting  the  vital  spirit  w  hich  has  pervaded  the  past,  the 


PREFACE 

true  foundations  upon  m  liicli  our  institutions  rest,  and  the  essential  principles  upon  which 
their  existence  and  perpetuity  depend.  It  would  furnish  an  ample  vnidication  of  those 
Mho  have  preceded  us  upon  this  sta-e,from  the  imputations  Mhich  ignorance  and  prejudice 
have  lal)oure(l  to  cast  upon  their  motives  and  their  acts  ;  and  our  free  institutions,  hy  hav- 
ing  their  foundations  laid  open  to  the  world,  and  the  whole  plan  of  their  structure  exhi- 
bifed,  will  recommend  tliemselves,  more  and  more,  to  the  philosophical  inquirer,  and  to 
the  aflVction  and  imitation  of  mankind. 

If  history  he  philosophy  teaching  hy  example,  how  infinitely  instructive  must  be  the 
history  of  such  a  country  as  this.  The  example  which  it  presents  is  the  purity  of  prin- 
cipk',  the  singleness  of  effort,  the  stern  adherence  to  constitutional  right,  the  manly  sub- 
ordination to  law,  tile  indignant  hostility  to  usurpation,  which  are  manifested  in  every  page 
of  our  past  history  ;  the  philosophy  it  inculcates  is — that  the  same  purity  of  motive,  the 
same  respect  for  lawful  authority,  the  same  opposition  to  tyranny,  the  same  vigilance  in 
detecting  the  first  insidious  approaches  of  despotism,  the  same  stem  resolution  in  resist- 
ing its  progress,  which  made  us  a  Nation,  are  equally  essential,  as  the  means  of  preserving 
those  liberties  our  fathers  beciueathed  to  us,  and  those  institutions  which  they  framed. 

Even  to  this  day  much  ignorance  and  much  misapprehension  prevail  as  to  the  princi- 
ples of  the  American  Revolution,  and  the  true  character  and  tendency  of  our  institutions. 
Nor  is  this  ignorance  altogether  confined  to  foreigners,  it  exists,  to  a  great  extent,  among 
ourselves.  By  many  superficial  persons,  it  is  supposed  that  the  American  Revolution 
began  with  the  battle  of  Lexington,  and  terminated  with  the  evacuation  by  the  British 
Troops  of  these  Unileil  Stales.  It  seems  to  be  the  opinion  of  such,  that  the  whole  his- 
tory of  that  IJevolution  is  to  be  found  in  the  narrative  of  the  campaigns  of  that  War. 
Widely  diflerent  from  this  is  the  truth,  as  developed  by  history;  widely  different  was  the 
opinion  of  those  who  mainly  aided  in  severing  the  connexion  with  Great  Britain.  "  What 
do  we  mean  by  the  American  Revolution  ?"  asks  one  of  the  most  prominent  actors  in 
those  days  :  "  Do  we  mean  the  American  War?  The  Revolution  was  effected  before  the 
"  War  commenced.  The  Revolution  was  in  the  mind  and  heart  of  the  people.  The 
"i-adical  change  in  the  principles,  opinions,  sentiments,  and  affections  of  the  people  was 
"  the  real  American  Revolution." 

Even  this  language  may,  without  due  reflection,  be  understood  in  a  sense  not  contem- 
plated by  its  illustrious  author.  A  full  and  careful  examination  of  the  history  of  the 
times  will  abundantly  show,  that  so  far  as  regards  the  nature  and  extent  of  their  rights, 
and  the  foundations  upon  which  they  were  claimed,  there  was,  substantially,  no  revolution 
or  change  in  the  principles  of  the  American  People.  The  first  emigrants  to  these  shores 
brought  with  them,  in  their  full  vigour,  in  their  original  purity,  and  in  their  complete  deve- 
lopment, the  principles  of  the  American  Revolution.  They  abandoned  their  native  homes, 
they  crossed  the  ocean,  braved  the  horrours  of  an  inhospitable  clime,  encountered  the 
perils  of  the  tempest,  of  war,  and  of  famine,  to  escape  the  burthen  of  governmental  op- 
pression. They  braved  all,  and  encountered  all,  in  the  same  cause  for  wliich  their  sons 
sul)sequently  fought  and  bled.  From  the  moment  they  placed  their  feet  upon  the  soil 
of  this  Western  Hemisphere,  they  asserted  and  maintained  their  independency  of  the 
Parliamentary  power  of  taxation,  and  denied,  to  that  extent,  the  authority  of  a  Legisla- 
ture in  which  they  Avere  not,  themselves,  represented.  Although  the  Colonies  were,  ori- 
ginally, settled  by  individual  enterprise,  and  by  insulated  rather  than  combined  efforts, 
yet  the  Colonists,  at  a  very  early  period,  perceived  the  advantages  of  union  in  repelling  or 
resisting  a  common  foe. 


The  Colonial  history  is  replete  with  evidence  of  the  truth  of  the  preceding  remarks. 


-  u  deeply  rooted  and  how  Avidely  diffused, 

even  at  these  remote  periods,  were  the  true  and  essential  principles  which,  subsequently 
expanding  into  maturity,  produced  the  fruits  of  the  American  Revolution.  In  1696  a 
pamphlet  was  published,  recommending  the  imposition  of  taxes  in  the  Colonies  by  au- 
thority of  Parliament.  It  did  not  escape  the  notice  of  the  vigilant  friends  of  American 
Liberty.  Two  answers  to  this  publication  appeared,  which  seem  to  have  attracted  gene- 
ral attention,  and  in  which  the  docu-iuewas  broadly  asserted  and  maintained,  that  no 
such  right  existed  in  Parliament,  because  the  Colonies  were  not  represented  in  that  body, 
riie  idea  of  combining  their  efforts  in  matters  of  common  interest  to  all  may  be  traced 
iKick  to  a  period  nearly  as  remote.  In  1690  a  communication  was  addressed  by  the 
General  Court  ot\MassucliU8elts  to  the  Governours  of  the  neighbouring  Colonies,  desiring 
them  to  appoint  Commissioners  "to  meet,  advise,  and  conchide  upon  suitable  methods 


PREFACE. 

in  assisting  each  other,  for  the  safety  of  the  whole  land."  Such  a  meeting  was,  accord- 
ingly, held,  and  evidence  exists  inducing  the  belief,  tliat  it  was  styled  by  the  now  familiar 
and  revered  name  of  Congress. 

Nor  did  the  principles  for  which  the  Colonists  contended  originate  on  this  side  of  the 
Atlantick.  The  doctrine  that  representation  and  taxation  -were  essentially  and  indissolu- 
bly  connected,  was  claimed  as  a  portion  of  English  Liberty,  as  interwoven  in  the  very 
structure  of  the  English  Constitution,  and  as  recognised  among  the  most  ancient  and 
firmly  established  principles  of  the  Common  Law.  It  was  no  innovation,  serving  as  a 
cloak  for  rebellion  and  revolution.  It  was  drawn  from  the  most  ancient  and  pure  foun- 
tains of  Liberty,  and  sanctioned  by  the  authority  of  the  most  eminent  judicial  characters 
in  the  British  Parliament. 

It  is  a  source  of  honest  pride,  in  reverting  to  the  contemporaneous  history  of  England, 
to  contrast  the  characters  of  the  individuals  who,  at  times,  it  is  true,  with  some  modifica- 
tions, yet  concurring  in  the  great  and  essential  principles  upon  which  our  ancestors  placed 
themselves,  sustained  the  doctrines  which  were  designated  as  .fimerican,  with  those  Avho 
originated  and  defended  those  measures  of  the  Ministry  which  drove  the  Colonists  first 
to  resistance,  and,  finally,  to  a  dissolution  of  the  political  connexion  by  which  tbey  had 
so  long  been  bound  to  the  Mother  Country.  Such  an  examination  will  conduct  to  the 
conclusion,  that  had  the  questions  upon  Avhich  the  controversy  turned,  assumed  a  judicial 
instead  of  a  political  character,  and  been  carried  for  decision  before  the  English  Courts, 
tlie  same  eminent  Judge,  who  first  decided  against  the  legality  of  general  warrants,  a\  ould 
have  pronounced  it  to  be  the  law  of  the  land  that  tliese  Colonists  were  not  subject  to  the 
taxing  power  of  Parliament. 

The  Work,  of  which  the  present  volume  is  a  specimen,  will  cleai'ly  imfold  and  develop 
the  whole  foundation  of  American  principles,  and  will  exhibit  to  the  Avorld  the  most  conclu- 
sive evidence  that  they  were,  without  exception,  grounded  in  strict  right,  based  upon  con- 
stitutional Law,  and  upon  the  well  settled  doctrines  of  the  English  Government :  that  there 
was  no  taint  or  tinge  of  anarchy,  of  insubordination  to  all  authority,  no  novelty,  no  inno- 
vation. The  important,  practical  truth  will  be  clearly  deducible  from  these  premises, 
that  if  such  be  the  foundations  they  must  ever  constitute  the  support  of  our  institutions. 
Their  beautiful  simplicity,  their  fair  proportions,  their  majestick  symmetry,  and  their 
stable  grandeur,  will  equally  recommend  them  to  our  love  and  veneration,  and  to  the 
respect  and  imitation  of  others. 

In  the  examination  of  the  contents  of  these  Volumes,  a  casual  observer  may,  perhaps, 
at  the  first  view,  be  struck  with  the  character  of  much  of  the  material  which  Ave  have  col- 
lected. A  more  mature  consideration  will  satisfy,  we  apprehend,  every  mind,  that  al- 
though much  of  it  has  been  drawn  from  perishable  and  ephemeral  sources,  no  faithful 
portrait  of  the  times  could  be  presented,  formed  from  other  ingredients. 

A  distinguished  foreign  jurist  has  said,  that  laws  are  not  to  be  created,  but  must  create 
themselves  ;  and  the  observation  is  equally  true  in  its  application  to  all  that  comes  within 
the  scope  of  legislation,  whether  political  or  municipal  in  its  immediate  character.  Biirlie 
has,  with  his  accustomed  philosophical  sagacity,  remarked,  that  "  to  follow,  not  to  force, 
"the  publick  inclination,  to  give  a  direction,  a  form,  a  technical  dress,  and  a  specifick  sanc- 
"  tion  to  the  general  sense  of  the  community,  is  the  true  end  of  legislation." 

If  this  be  true  in  any  country,  and  under  any  institutions,  most  emphatically  is  it  true, 
and  ever  has  been  true,  among  us.  Without  concurring  altogether  in  the  observation  of 
De  Tocqueville,  iha.i  the  journals  are  the  only  historical  monuments  of  the  United  States^ 
it  may,  without  fear  of  contradiction,  be  asserted,  that  there  exist  no  sources  of  histori- 
cal information  in  a  free  and  enlightened  country,  so  rich  and  so  valuable,  as  its  publick 
journals,  and  the  proceedings  and  debates  of  its  publick  bodies  and  associations.  It  is 
peculiarly  the  case,  at  such  times  as  those  comprehended  within  the  scope  of  our  Work. 
Constitutions  were  to  be  formed,  the  whole  frame  of  Government  to  be  constructed,  legis- 
lative bodies  to  be  organized,  and  in  this  preliminary  action,  as  well  as  in  the  movements  of 
tlie  machine  when  brought  into  life,  publick  opinion  was  to  be  the  efficient  and  vital  prin- 
ciple. This  publick  opinion  must,  necessarily,  be  created,  as  well  as  manifested,  through 
the  instrumentality  of  the  means  which  have  been  indicated. 

It  was  urged  on  more  than  one  occasion  and  by  high  authority  in  England,  that  the  Ame- 
rican contest  originated  in,  and  was  sustained  by,  the  selfish  or  ambitious  designs  of  a  few 
leading  individuals.  That  personal  interest  gave  it  birth,  and  sustenance,  and  support.  This 
was  only  one  of  the  palpable  misrepresentations  and  gross  delusions  of  the  times.  The  pre- 
sent Work  will  show,  beyond  the  possibihty  of  future  rational  doubt,  that  the  roots  of  Ame- 
rican freedom  had  penetrated  into  every  corner  of  our  land  and  drew  their  active  and  living 
nourishment  from  every  family  fountain.     Every  reader  of  this  compilation  will  perceive  as 


PREFACE. 

oue  of  the  most  distinctly  marked  facts  which  it  establishes,  that  the  American  Revolution 
was  the  act  of  the  whole  American  People,  and  that  all  our  institutions  are  the  w^ork  of  the 
same  creator.  This  we  esteem  as  one  of  the  most  precisely  taught  lessons  of  our  history,  and 
if  properly  appreciated  and  applied,  the  most  valuable  which  it  inculcates.  We  shall  learn 
that  unless  the  People,  as  such,  had  worked  out  their  own  rescue  from  the  oppression,  which 
was  rather  seen  in  perspective  than  actually  endured,  all  the  personal  influence  and  intellect 
of  the  great  men  of  the  day  would  have  failed  to  accomplish  this  result.  Happy  will  it  be 
for  our  beloved  country,  if,  drawing  the  obvious  inference  from  this  history  of  the  past,  every 
American  citizen  shall  be  impressed  with  the  conviction  that  as  he  is  individually  interested, 
in  the  blessings  which  freedom  confers,  so  there  is  imposed  upon  him  the  personal  duty  and 
sacred  trust  of  vigilantly  watching  and  manfully  sustaining  that  liberty  which  has  been  trans- 
mitted to  him. 

It  would  be  unnecessary,  on  this  occasion,  to  enter  into  a  minute  detail  of  the  sources  from 
which  we  have  drawn  the  materials  of  this  compilation.  It  may  not  be  unnecessary,  how- 
ever, to  observe  that,  in  the  prosecution  of  eur  labours,  we  have,  personally,  examined  the 
publick  records  in  each  of  the  thirteen  original  States.  We  regret  to  say,  that  we  have  found 
these,  in  some  instances,  in  a  lamentable  state  of  deterioration,  confusion,  and  decay  ;  many 
important  documents  and  publick  proceedings  appear  to  be  irretrievably  lost.  We  have, 
however,  the  satisfaction  of  believing,  that  the  inquiries  and  examinations  we  have  instituted, 
have,  in  some  instances,  been  instrumental  in  rescuing  many  of  inestimable  value  from  the 
very  jaws  of  destruction :  and,  in  others,  in  awakening  a  feeling  of  interest  in  the  memorials 
of  our  past  history,  which  promises  to  result  in  a  more  persevering  search  for  such  as  may 
still  remain  in  existence,  and  a  more  careful  preservation  of  such  as  have  survived  the  haz- 
aids  to  which  they  have  been  exposed.  No  doubt  is  entertained,  but  that  there  still  exist, 
not  only  in  publick  places  of  deposite,  but  in  family  archives,  papers  of  great  importance  as 
illustrating  the  history  of  the  times,  and  we  would  earnestly  press  upon  individuals,  in  whose 
possession  such  documents  may  be  found,  a  minute  examination  among  them,  and  a  careful 
preservation  of  such  as  possess  general  interest ;  more  particularly,  the  correspondence  of 
the  members  of  the  various  Committees,  Conventions,  Assemblies,  and  Congresses.  Any 
communication  made  to  the  Editor  of  copies  of  such  documents,  or  a  notification  of  their 
existence,  with  the  liberty  of  inspecting  and  using  them,  will  confer  not  only  a  personal 
favour,  but  promote  the  general  good.  Papers  belonging  to  the  period  of  time  embraced  by 
the  present  Volume,  which  may  be  obtained  hereafter,  will  be  inserted  in  a  Supplement  to 
this  Series  of  the  work. 

Washington,  December,  1837. 


CONTENTS. 


PROCEEDINGS    IN    PARLIAMENT    ON  THE  KINGS  MESSAGE  OF 
THE  7th  OF  MARCH,    1774. 


1774. 
March 
7. 


11, 


16, 
23, 
30, 


April 
14, 


15, 


House  of  Lords. 

The  King's  Message  relating  to  the  Disturbances 
in  America,  and  requesting  Parliament  to  make 
provision  for  better  securing  the  execution  of 
the  Laws,  and  the  just  dependence  of  the  Col- 
onies upon  the  Cron-n  and  Parliament,  - 
Papers,  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  America, 
laid  before  the  House  by  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth— 
From  Massachusetts  Bay, 
From  New- York, 
From  South  Carolina, 
From  New-Hampshire, 
From  the  Admiralty, 
From  the  War  Office, 
From  the  East  India  Company, 
From  the  Treasury, 
Address  to  the  King  ordered. 
More  Papers  submitted  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth, 
Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  America, 

to  be  considered  on  the  17th, 
Consideration  postponed  to  the  24th, 
Consideration  further  postponed, 
Committee  ordered  to  inquire  into  the  Proceed- 
ings of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  Massachu- 
setts Bay  referred  to  the  Committee, 
Lords  who  formed  the  Committee,     • 
Address  to  the  King  for  all  Papers  relating  to 
Disturbances  in  Massachusetts  Bay,  received 
from  Officers  in  his  Majesty's  service  there, 
from  July  7,  1766,  which  have  not  already 
been  laid  before  the  House, 
Papers  called  for  in  the  Address  of  yesterday, 

sent  by  the  King's  command. 
Referred  to  the  Committee  appointed  on  the  30th 


11 


11 


March 
14, 


of  March,            .... 

. 

12 

20,     Report  of  the  Committee, 

- 

12-31 

House  of  Commons. 

larch  The  King's  Message, 

- 

32 

7,     Papers  presented  by  Lord  North, 

• 

32 

Lord  North's  Speech  on  presenting  the 

Papers, 

222 

Motion  for  an  Address  to  the  King, 

- 

32 

Debate — Lord  Clare, 

. 

33 

Mr.  Dowdeswell, 

33 

Governour  Pownall, 

- 

33 

Mr.  E.  Burke,            -      '  • 

. 

33 

Mr.  Solicitor  General, 

. 

34 

Mr.  E.  Burke, 

- 

34 

24, 

Lord  George  Germain, 

. 

■      34 

General  Conway, 

- 

•      35 

25. 

Colonel  Barre, 

. 

•      36 

Address  ordered,      -        .         .         . 

- 

•      36 

ON  THE  BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 

House  of  Commons. 
March  The  King's  Message,  and  Papers  presented  this 


day,  to  be  considered  on  the  1 1th, 

Papers  presented  by  Lord  North, 

Message  and  Papers  considered,  and  ordered  for 
further  consideration  on  the  14th,  - 

Petition  from  William  Bollan,  Agent  for  Massa- 
chusetts, presented,       .         -         -        .         . 

Gallery  of  the  House  cleared,    .        -         .         . 

Message  and  Papers  considered, 

Speech  of  Lord  North, 

Fourth  Series. 


7 
11 


14, 


35 
35 

35 

35 
36 
37 
37 


18, 

21, 

23, 


Motion  by  Lord  North  for  leave  to  bring  in  Bos- 
ton Port  Bill, 
Debate — Mr.  Grosvenor, 

Governour  Johnstone, 

Lord  North, 

Mr.  Dempster, 

Mr.  Sawbridge, 

Mr.  Byng, 

Mr.  R.  Fuller, 

Mr.  Dowdeswell, 

Mr.  Henry  Cavendish, 

Captain  Phipps, 

Lord  George  Cavendish, 

Colonel  Barr^, 
Motion  agreed  to, 
Committee  to  bring  in  the  Bill, 
Further  consideration  of  Message  and  Papers  re- 
ferred to  Committee  of  the  Whole  House,  on 
Friday  next,  the  18th,  .         .         .         . 

Lord  North  presented  the  Bill, 

Read  the  first  time, 

Second  reading  ordered  on  the  21st,    - 

Motion  to  print  the  Bill  rejected. 

Consideration  of  Message  and  Papers  postponed 

to  the  23d, 

The  Bill  read  the  second  time, 

To  be  considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,  on 

the  23d, 

Order  for  Committee  of  the  Whole  on  the  Mes- 
sage and  Papers  discharged. 
Message  and  Papers  referred  to  Committee  of  the 

Whole  on  the  Bill, 

House  in  Committee  of  the  Whole  on  the  Bill, 
Debate — Mr.  Fuller,        ..... 

Mr.  Herbert, 

Lord  North, 

Mr.  Gascoigne,  .... 

Mr.  Montague,  .... 

Mr.  Byng, 

Mr.  Stanley, 

Mr.  Dempster,  .... 

Lord  North, 

Mr.  Ward, 

Mr.  Jenkinson,  .... 

General  Conway,       .         -         -        - 

Mr.  Fuller,         -         -        -         -     •  - 

Mr.  Charles  James  Fox,     - 

Captain  Phipps,         .... 

Lord  North, 


Colonel  Barr^,  .... 

Bill  reported  to  the  House,         .         .        -        - 
Third  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered  for  to-mor- 
row, ..--•-- 
Petition  from  William  Bollan,  Agent  for  Massa- 
chusetts, offered  by  Mr.  Crosbie,  - 
House  refuse  to  receive  it,  .         .        .         - 
Notice  of  the  rejection  of  this  Petition,  (Note,)    - 
Petition  of  several  Natives  of  North  America, 

against  the  Bill,  presented  and  read. 
Bill  read  the  third  time,    -         -        -        -        - 

Motion  of  Mr.  Charles  James  Fox,  to  strike  out 
a  clause  of  the  Bill,    -        -        -        -        - 

Rejected  ------- 

Motion  of  Mr.  Charles  Fox  to  strike  out  another 

clause  of  the  Bill, 

Rejected,        -        -        -        '   .,,  " 
(Question  on  the  passage  of  the  Bui, 
Debate — Mr.  Dowdeswell,        -         •        -        - 
Mr.  Welbore  Ellis,     -         -        -         - 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke, 


39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
40 
40 
40 


40 
40 
41 
41 
41 

41 
41 

41 

41 

41 
41 
41 
41 
42 
43 
43 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 


Mr.  Van, 45 


46 
46 

46 

46 
46 
46 

47 
47 

48 
48 

48 
48 
49 
49 
49 
50 


XIX 

1774. 

May 

11. 


CONTENTS. 


XX 


Speech 


51 
5'2 
52 
5-2 
52 
52 
52 
53 
57 
07 
57 


56 


58 

58 

59 
59 

59 


60 
60 
60 
60 

60 

60 
60 
60 
60 

61 


Debate — Mr.  Grey  Cooper,     - 
Mr.  Anthony  Ikcon, 
Governour  Pownall, 
Lord  John  Cavendish, 
Mr.  T.  Towmshend,  - 
Mr.  Sawbridge, 
Lord  Norili, 
Governour  Johnstone, 
Mr.  Sawbridge, 
Lord  North, 
The  Bill  passed,       "         '         "  , 

Remarks   ou    Governour    Johnstone's 

(Note,) 

House  of  Lonls. 

March  Boston  Port  Bill  received  from  the  Commons,   • 

26,     Read  the  first  time,  -        -         -        "        " 

Second  reading  ordered  on  the  28th,  and  the 

Lords  summoned,         ''''.' 

28,  Petition  of  Suphrn  Sayre  and  others.  Natives  of 

America,  presented  by  Lord  Wycombe,  - 

Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  America, 

read,  ------- 

Bill  read  the  second  time,  .        .        -        - 

Motion  to  commit  the  Bill,  after  long  debate, 

agreed  to, 

Committed  to  a  Committee  of  the  Whole  House 

for  to-morrow, 

29,  Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,     - 

Reported  to  the  House, 

Third  reading  ordered  to-morrow, 

30,  Petition  of  William  Bollan,  Agent  of  Massachu- 

setts, presented  by  the  Earl  of  Stair, 
Mr.  Bollan  heard  at  the  Bar  of  the  House  against 

the  Bill,      - 

Bill  read  the  third  time, 

Passed,  ....--- 

31,  Royal  assent  to  the  Bill, 

Petition  of  Natives  of  North  America,  to  the 

King,  against  the  Bill,  .  .  .  - 
"  An  Act  to  discontinue  in  such  manner,  and  for 
such  time,  as  are  therein  mentioned,  the  land- 
ing and  discharging,  lading  or  shipping,  of 
Goods,  Wares,  and  Merchandise,  at  the  Towti, 
and  within  the  Harbour  of  Boston,  in  the  Prov- 
ince of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  Ame- 
rica,"          61-66 

ON  THE   BILL  FOR  BETTER  REGULATING  THE  GOVERNMENT 
OF    MASSACHUSETTS    BAY. 

House  of  Commons. 

March  Committee  of  the  Whole  House  ordered  on  the 
25,         King's  Message  of  March  7,  and  Papers  pre- 

sentwi  by  Lord  North,          -        -         -        -  65 
Papers  presented  November  28,  and  December  7, 
1768,  January  20,  1769,  and  May  7,  1770,  re- 
lating to  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in  North  Ame- 

i  ■               rica,  referred  to  the  Committee,       -        -        -  65 
Massachusetts  Bay  Charter,  granted  by   King 
William  and  Q,ueen  Mary,  presented  to  the 
House  on  the  22d  of  January,  1740,  referred 

to  the  Committee, 65 

28,     House  in  Committee  on  the  Message  and  Pa- 
pers,        --..-.-65 

Lord  North's  Speech, 65 

His  motion  for  leave  to  bring  in  a  Bill  for  better 
regulating  the  Gtovemment  of  Massachusetts 

Bay, 66 

Debate — Mr.  Byng, 66 

Sir.  F.  Norton,  (Speaker,)  ■        -        -  67 

Lord  North, 67 

Mr.  Stephen  Fox,       -         -        -         -  67 

Lord  George  Germain,       -        -        -  67 

Lord  North, 68 

Mr.  Pownall, 68 

Lord  North's  motion  agreed  to,          ...  Qg 

Committee  to  prepare  and  bring  in  the  Bill,        -  68 

April  The  Bill  presented  by  Lord  North,  -        •        -  68 

15,     Debate — Lord  North, 68 

Mr.  R.  Fuller, 69 

Mr.  Dempster, 69 

Lord  North, 69 

Mr.  Dowdeswell,       -        -        -        -  69 

Governour  Pownall,           -        -        -  69 

The  Bill  read  the  first  time,      -        -        •        -  70 

Second  reading  ordered  for  the  22d,    -        -        •  70 

Bill  ordered  to  be  printed,         -        •        •        -  70 


1774. 

April 

19, 


21. 


25, 


27, 

28, 


Address  to  the  King,  for  copies  of  Acts  of  the 
General  Court  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  for  sum- 
moning, returning,  and  regulating  the  choice 
of  Grand  and  Petit  Jurors,  and  copies  of  all 
other  Acts  of  the  said  General  Court,  for  the 
regulation  of  Townships  and  Town  Meetings, 
Address  to  the  King,  for  Letters  and  other  Pa 

pers, 
The  Letters  and  other  Papers  presented  by  Lord 

North, " 

C)rdor  of  the  Day,  for  the  second  reading  of  the 

Bill,  read, 

Debate— Mr.  Fuller, 

Sir  George  Savile,     - 
Mr.  Wel'bore  Ellis,    - 
General  Conway, 
Lord  North, 
Sir  George  Yonge,    - 
Governour  Johnstone, 
Mr.  C.  Jenkinsoii, 
Mr.  Harris, 

Sir  Edward  Astley,    -         •   ■ 
Mr.  Ward, 
Governour  Pownall, 
Mr.  Rigby, 
Governour  Pownall, 
Mr.  Charles  James  Fox, 
Sir  Gilbert  Elliot,       - 
Sir  Richard  Sutton,    - 
The  Bill  read  the  second  time. 
To  be  considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole 

House,  on  the  27th, 
Acts  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  pre 
sented  to  the  House  pursuant  to  the  Address  to 
the  King,  of  the  19th, 
House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill, 
Report  of  Committee  to  be  received  to-morrow, 
Petition  of  William  Bollan,  Agent  for  Massachu 

setts  Bay,  offered  by  Mr.  Dowdeswell, 

Debate — Mr.  Dowdeswell, 

Sir  George  Savile, 

Lord  North,       .... 

The  House  refuse  to  receive  the  Petition,   - 

Entries  in  the  Journals  of  the  House,  of  9th  of 

November,  1696,  19th  of  March,  1722,  and  22d 

of  March,  1722,  read, 

Motion  the  Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Whole 
House  be  received  this  day  four  months, 

Rejected, 

Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Whole  House  re- 
ceived,       ....... 

Bill  ordered  to  be  engrossed,      .         -         .        - 
Third  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered  for  Monday 

next, 

May  2,  Petition  of  several  Natives  of  America,  presented 
by  Sir  George  Savile, 
Motion  for  the  third  reading  of  the  Bill, 
Debate — Mr.  Dunning,    - 

Sir  William  Meredith, 
Mr.  Stanley, 
Mr.  T.  To\vnshend,    - 
Colonel  Barre,  - 
Mr.  Stephen  Fox, 
Marquis  of  Carmarthen,     - 
Mr.  St.  John,      - 
Mr.  Byng, 
Mr.  Rigby, 
General  Conway, 
Lord  George  Germain, 
Mr.  Charles  Fo.x, 
Mr.  Attorney  General  Thurlow, 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke, 
Lord  North, 
Sir  George  Savile, 
Bill  read  the  third  time,  and  passed,    - 

House  of  Lords. 
May  3,  Bill  for  the  better  regulating  the  Government  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  received  from  the  Com- 
mons,   

Read  the  first  time, 

Read  the  second  time. 

Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole, 

Reported,  with  Amendments,     - 

Amendments  agreed  to,     - 

Third  reading  ordered  for  to-morrow. 

Petition  from  several  Natives  of  America  pre- 
sented,         


29, 


6, 

9, 

10, 


11, 


70 

70 

70 

71 
71 
71 
71 
72 
72 
73 
73 
73 
74 
74 
74 
74 
76 
76 
77 
77 
77 
77 

77 


77 
79 
79 

79 
79 
80 
80 
80 


81 


81 

81 
81 


81 
83 
83 
84 
84 
85 
85 
87 
87 
87 
88 
88 
89 
89 
90 
90 
90 
91 
91 
91 


92 
92 
92 
92 
92 
92 
92 

92 


w 


XXI 

1774. 

May 

11. 


CONTENTS. 


XXIt 


10, 
19. 


20, 


Petition  from  William  Bollan,  Agent  of  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,  presented,         .... 

Motion  that  Mr.  Bollan  be  called  in,  and  heard 
at  the  Bar, 

After  debate,  Rejected, 

Bill  read  the  third  time,  and,  after  long-  debate, 
passed,         ....... 

Protest, 

Notice  of  the  proceedings  of  the  Lords  on  the 
Bill,  (Note,) 

Amendments  agreed  to  by  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, on  the  13th, 

Petition  from  Natives  of  America,  in  London, 
against  the  passage  of  the  Bill,  presented  to 
the  King,  --.... 

The  King's  assent  to  the  Bill, 

Speech  of  the  Bishop  of  St.  Asaph,  intended  to 
have  been  spoken  on  the  Bill, 

"An  Act  for  the  better  regulating  the  Govern- 
ment of  the  Province  of  the  Massachusetts 
Bay,  in  New  England,"       -        -        -      104-112 


92 

92 
93 

93 
93 

93 

96 


9G 
96 

97 


ON  THE  BILL  FOR  THE  IMPARTIAL  ADMINISTRATION  OP  JUS- 
TICE IN  THE  PROVINCE  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  DAY. 

House  of  Commons. 

March  The  King's  Message  of  March  7th,  and  sundry 
28,         other  Papers,  to  be  considered  in  Committee 

of  the  Whole,  on  the  13th  of  April,        -        -      111 
April   Order  for  Committee  of  the  Whole  postponed  to 


13, 


21. 


the  15th, Ill 

Papers  presented  by  Lord  North,      -        -        -  1 1 1 

House  in  Committee  on  the  Message  and  Papers,  1 12 

Lord  North's  Speech, 112 

His  motion  for  leave  to  bring  in  a  Bill  for  the 
Impartial  Administration  of  Justice  in  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,       113 

Debate — Colonel  Barr^,          -        -        -        -  113 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderbum,    -  115 

Captain  Phipps,         -         -         -         -  116 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,            -         -         -  116 

Mr.  Dowdeswell,       -         -        -        -  117 

Lord  Carmarthen,     -        -        .        -  117 

Lord  North, 117 

Captain  Phipps,         -         -         -      .  -  117 

General  Conway,       -         •         -        -  117 

Mr.  Van, 118 

Lord  North's  motion  agreed  to,          -         -         -  118 
Committee  appointed  to  prepare  and  bring  in 

the  Bill, 118 


25, 


The  Bill  presented  by  Lord  North,  -        •        -  118 

Debate — Mr.  Sawbridge,          -         -         -         -  118 

Lord  North, 118 

Sir  Thomas  Frankland,      -         -         -  1 19 

Mr.  Byng, 119 

Lord  Beauchamp,     -        -         -        -  119 

Mr.  Sawbridge,          -         -         -         -  1 19 

Second  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered  on  the  25th,  -  119 
The  Order,  for  the  second  reading  of  the  Bill, 

read, 120 

Debate — Mr.  Dowdeswell,      -        -        -        -  120 

Mr.  Dyson,       .         .         .         ,         .  120 

Lord  North, 120 

Mr.  Cavendish,          -        -        -        -  120 
Colonel  Barre,           -         -        -         -  120 
The  Bill  read  the  second  time,          -         -         -  120 
Committee  of  the  Whole  House  on  the  Bill,  or- 
dered for  the  29th, 120 

The  Bill  considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,  120 
Report  of  the  Committee  to  be  received  on  Mon- 
day next,  (May  2,)       120 

May  2,  Petition  of  several  Natives  of  America,  presented 

by  Sir  George  Sa-vdle,            -        .         -         -  120 

Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole  postponed,    -  120 

Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole  received,      -  120 

Amendment  proposed  by  Mr.  Wallace,     -         -  120 

Debate — Mr.   Dunning,           -        .        .         -  121 

Mr.  Wedderbum,      -        .         .        -  121 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke,          -         -         -121 

Mr.  W.Burke,          -        -        .        -  121 

Mr.  Stanley, 121 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,  -        -        .        .  122 

Mr.  Cornwall, 122 

Mr.  Moreton, 122 

Mr.  Phipps, 122 

Mr.  Skynner, 122 

Sir  Richard  Sutton,   -        -        -        -123 


29, 


4, 


177-1. 

May 

4. 


Debate — Mr.  Charles  Fox,     -        .        -        -  123 

Captain  Phipps,        -        -        -        -  123 

Sir  George  Savile,     -         -         -         -  123 

Mr.  Sk}-nner, 123 

Motion  to  amend,  by  Mr.  Wallace,  wthdrawn,  -  123 
Standing  rule  for  exclusion  of  strangers  strictly 

enforced,  (Note,) 123 

Engrossment  of  the  Bill  ordered,       -         -         -  124 

Motion  to  print  the  Bill  negatived,     -         -         -  124 

Third  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered  for  the  6th,     -  124 

G,     Order  read,  for  third  reading  of  the  Bill,     -         -  124 

Debate — Mr.  Dempster,          -        -        .        -  124 

Mr.  Grey, 125 

Mr.  Paulet, 125 

Mr.  Sawbridge,          -         -         -        -  125 

Colonel  Barr6,           -        -         -        -  125 

Bill  read  the  third  time,            -        -         -         -  126 

Amendment  adopted,  on  motion  of  Mr.  Pultney,  126 

Debate — Mr.  Fuller, 126 

Mr.  H.  Cavendish,    -        -        -        -  126 

The  Bill  passed, 126 

House  of  Lords. 
May  9,  Bill  for  Impartial  Administration  of  Justice  in 
Massachusetts  Bay,  received  from  the  House 

of  Commons, 126 

Read  the  first  time, 127 

13,     Read  the  second  time, 127 

16,  Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,      -         -  127 
Third  reading  ordered  for  the    18th,  and  the 

Lords  summoned, 127 

17,  Papers  presented  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,      -  127 

18,  The  Bill  read  the  third  time,     -         -         -         -  127 
Petition  from  William  Bollan,  Agent  for  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,  presented,        ....  127 

Motion,  that  Mr.  Bollan  be  heard  at  the  Bar,  af- 
ter debate,  rejected, 127 

Motion,  that  the  Bill  do  pass,    -        -         -        -  127 

Debate — Earl  of  Buckinghamshire,           -        -  127 

Lord  Shelburne,        -        -        -         -  127 

Duke  of  Manchester,          -        -        -  127 

Marquis  of  Rockingham,  -        -         -  127 

Duke  of  Richmond,  -        -        -        -  128 

The  Bill  passed, 128 

Protest, 128 

Notice  of  the  Debates  on  this  Bill,  (Note,)        -  128 

20,  The  King's  assent  to  the  Bill,  -  -  -  -  128 
"An  Act  for  the  Impartial  Administration  of 
Justice  in  the  cases  of  Persons  questioned  for 
any  acts  done  by  them  in  the  Execution  of  the 
Law,  or  for  the  Suppression  of  Riots  and  Tu- 
mults, in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
in  New  England,"       ....      129-132 


ON  THE  MOTION  FOR  THE  REPEAL  OF  THE  PUTY  ON  TEA. 

House  of  Commons. 

April   Mr.  Fuller's  motion  for  a  Committee  of  the  Whole 

19,         to  take  into  consideration  the  Repeal  of  the  Du- 

ty of  three  pence  per  potmd  on  ' 
Debate— Mr.  Fuller, 

rea. 

-     133 

-     133 

Mr.  Pennant,    - 

-     133 

Mr.  Rice, 

-     133 

Captain  Phipps, 

-        -     133 

Mr.  Stephen  Fox, 

-     134 

Mr.  Cornwall, 

-     134 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke, 

-      135-163 

Mr.  Wedderbum, 

-     163 

Mr,  E.  Burke. 

-     164 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,       - 

-     164 

Lord  Beauchamp, 

-     164 

General  Burgoyne,    - 

-     164 

Mr.  T.  Townshend, 

•     164 

Lord  Clare,     - 

-     165 

Mr.  Buller,      - 

-     165 

Mr.  Frederick  Montague 

-     165 

Colonel  Barr^, 

-     165 

Lord  North,    - 

-     166 

Mr.  Dowdeswell,     - 

-     166 

Mr.  Fuller's  motion  rejected,   - 

-     166 

ON  THE  BILL  FOR  QUARTERING  TROOPS  IN  AMERICA. 

House  of  Commo-ns. 
April   Leave  granted,  and  Committee  appointed,  to  pre- 
29,  pare  and  bring  in  a  Bill  providing  suitable 

Quarters  for  Troops  in  America,  -        -      165 

ilfay  2,  The  Bill  presented  by  Lord  Barrington,   -        -     165 

Read  the  first  time, 165 


XXIII 

1774. 

May  4,  Read  the  second  time,      .         -         -        • 

5,  Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,  - 

6,  Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole  received, 
9,     Bill  read  the  third  time,  and  passed, 


CONTENTS. 


XXIV 


165 
166 
167 
167 


Home  of  Lords. 
Jfay9,Bill  for  Guartering  Troops  in  America,  received 

from  the  House  of  Commons,       •        -        -  167 

Read  the  first  time, 167 

12,     Read  the  second  time, 167 

16,     Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,    •         -  167 

Third  reading  ordered  for  the  18th,           -         -  167 

18,      Third  reading  postponed  to  the  26th,         -         -167 

26,      Rf>ad  the  third  time, 167 

Lord  Chatham's  Spi>ech  against  the  passage  of 

the  Bill, 167 

The  Bill  passed, 169 

J»»e  2,  The  King's  assent  to  the  Bill,           -         -        -  170 
"  An  Act  for  the  better  providing  suitable  Quar- 
ters for  Officers  and  Soldiers  in  his  Majesty's 

service  in  North  America,"           -        •         •  170 

ON  THE  BILL  FOR  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  QUEBECK. 

Hoiist  of  Lords. 
May  2,  Bill  for  the  government  of  Quebeck,  presented 

by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,           -        -        -     169 
Read  the  first  time, 169 

3,  Address  to  the  King  for  copies  of  Instructions 

to  Governours  in  America,  ...      170 

4,  Second  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered,  and  the 

Ijords  smmnoned, 170 

6,  Copies  of  Instructions  to  Governours  of  Cluebeck, 
Nova  Scotia,  New- Hampshire,  New- York, 
Virginia,  North  Carolina,  South  Carolina, 
Georgia,  East  Florida,  and  West  Florida,  laid 
before  the  House, 171 

12,  Bill  read  the  second  time,  -        -        -        -      171 

13,  Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole,    -         -      171 

16,  Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole  received,     •  171 

17,  Bill  read  the  third  time,            -         -         -         -  171 
,     Amendment  to  limit  the  duration  of  the  Act,  of- 
fered and  rejected,         171 

Bill  passed, 171 

House  of  Commons, 
May     Bill  for  the  government  of  Quebeck,  received 

18,  from  the  House  of  Lords,     -        -        -        -      171 

Read  the  first  time, 171 

Ordered  to  be  printed, 171 

20,  Address  to  the  King,  for  copies  of  the  Proclama- 
tion of  1763,  and  General  Murray's  Commis- 
sion,   172 

26,     Presented  by  Lord  North,        -        -        -         -      172 
Proclamation,  of  October  7,  1763,  -         -      172 

Greneral  Murray's  Commission  as  Captain  Gen- 
eral and  Governour  of  Quebeck,  -        -      175 
Order  read,  for  second  reading  of  the  Bill,         -      180 
Debate— Mr.  T.  Townshend,            -         -         -180 

Lord  North, 181 

Mr.  Dunning,  -         •        -         -      182 

Mr.  Attorney  General  Thurlow,  -  183 
Colonel  Barr^,  -        -        -         -      184 

Lord  John  Cavendish,  -  -  -  184 
Mr.  Serjeant  Glynn,  -        -        -      184 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderbum,  •  184 
Mr.  Charles  James  Fox,  -  -  -  184 
Mr.  Dempster,  -        -         -        -      184 

Mr.  Sawbridge,  -        -        -        -      185 

The  Bill  read  the  second  time,  -        -        -      185 

Committed  to  a  Committee  of  the  Whole  House, 

on  the  31st, 185 

31,  Petition  of  Thomas  Penn,  on  behalf  of  himself 
and  John  Penn,  true  and  absolute  Proprietors 
of  the  Province  of  Pennsylvania,  and  the 
Three  Lower  Counties  on  Delaware,  present- 
ed by  Mr.  Baker, 185 

Petitioners  to  be  heard  by  their  Counsel,  if  they 

think  fit, 186 

Petition  of  Merchants  of  London  trading  to  Que- 

beck,  presented  by  Mr.  Mackworth,  -  -  186 
Mr.  Mack  worth's  motion  for  copies  of  Reports 
from  Major  General  Carleton,  Governour, 
William  Hey,  Chief  Justice,  and  Francis  Ma- 
seres,  late  Attorney  General,  of  the  Province 
of  Quebeck;  and  from  his  Majesty's  Advo- 
cate General,  Attorney  General,  and  Solicitor 
General,  relating  to  the  said  Province,  -     186 


1774, 

May 

31, 


Debate— Lord  North, 187 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,            -        -         -  187 
Colonel  Barre,           -        -         -         -  187 
Mr.  Altorney  General  Thurlow,         -  1 87 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke,          -         -         -  187 
Mr.  Mackworth's  motion  rejected,     -         -         -  188 
Address  to  the  King  for  copies  of  Reports  from 
the  Lords  Commissioners  of  Trade  and  Plan- 
tations, relating  to  the  Province  of  Cluebeck,  1 88 
House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,      -         -         -  188 
The   Committee  addressed  by  Mr.   Mansfield, 

coiuisel  for  the  Petitioners,  against  the  Bill,  188 

Edward  Watts  examined  before  the  Committee,  188 
Samuel  Morin  examined,          -         -         -         -188 
June  1,  Copies  of  Representations  of  the  Lords  Commis- 
sioners for  Trade  and  Plantations,  of  Septem- 
ber 2,  1765,  and  July  10,   1769,  and  Repre- 
sentation of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  January  9, 

1765,  presented  by  Lord  North,            -         -  188 
Copies  of  Memorials  from  Quebeck,  presented 

by  Lord  North,            -        -         -         -         -  189 

2,  Petition  from  the  Inhabitants  of  Quebeck  to  the 

King,  presented  by  Lord  North,             -         -  1 89 
House  in  Committee  of  the  Whole  on  the  Bill,  189 
Examination  of  General  Carleton  before  the  Com- 
mittee,        189 

Examination  of  Mr.  Maseres,  late  Attorney  Gen- 
eral of  Quebeck,        -         -         -         -         -191 
Examination  of  Mr.  Hey,  Chief  Justice  of  the 

Province  of  Quebeck,         -         -         -         -  193 

3,  Petition  of  the  Common  Cotmcil  of  the  City  of 

London,  against  the  Bill,  presented  at  the  Bar 
of  the  House,  by  the  Sherifl^s  of  the  City,     -  194 
House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,     ...  194 
Examination  of  M.  De  Lotbiniere,            .         .  194 
Examination  of  Dr.  James  Marriott,  his  Majes- 
ty's Advocate  General,        ....  195 
Motion  by  Mr.   Baker,  that  General   Murray, 
late  Governour  of  Canada,  do  attend  the  Com. 

mittee, 202 

Debate— Mr.  T.  To^\-nshend,          -        -        -  203 

Lord  North, 203 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,           -         -         -  203 

Colonel  Barre,         ....  203 

Captain  Phipps,       ....  203 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,     .         -         -         -  203 
Lord  North,             .         -         -         .203 

Mr.  Baker's  motion  rejected,            ...  203 

6,  House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,  ...  203 
Governour  Johnstone's  objections  to  the  Bill,  -  203 
Mr.  E.  Burke's  motion  to  amend,   fixing   the 

Boundary  between  Canada  and  New. York, 

agreed  to,          ......  204 

Further  Debate  on  the  Boundaries  of  Quebeck,  204 

7,  The  Bill  further  considered  in  Committee  of  the 

Whole  House, 204 

8,  House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,  ...  205 
Debate — Mr.  Burke, 205 

Lord  North, 205 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,  .         -         .205 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke,         -         •         .  205 

Colonel  Barre,         ....  205 
New  form  of  oath  proposed  by  Mr.  Jenkinson,  to 

be  inserted  in  the  Bill,         .         -         -         .  205 
Agreed  to  by  the  Committee,           ...  205 
10,     The  Bill  reported  to  the  House,  from  the  Com- 
mittee of  the  Whole,           ....  207 
T.  Penn,  Esq.,  declined  being  heard  by  Counsel 

on  his  Petition,  presented  on  the  31st  of  May,  207 
Amendment  to  the  Bill,  in  relation  to  the  South- 
ern Boundary  of  Canada,            ...  207 
Mr.  Mackworth's  motion,  to  provide  for  Trials 
by  Jury  in  Canada,     .....  207 

Debate — Lord  North, 207 

Mr.  Serjeant  Glynn,          -         .         .  208 

Mr.  Attorney  General  Thurlow,         -  208 

Mr.  Dunning,          ....  208 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderburn,  209 

Mr.  Byng, 209 

Governour  Johnstone,        ...  209 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,           -         .         .  209 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke,         .         .         .209 

Mr.  Mackworth's  motion  rejected,             .         -  211 
Motion  by  Mr.  T.  Townshend,  to  make  tempo- 
rary that  part  of  the  Bill  which  relates  to  the 
Legislative  Council,  rejected,       -        .         .211 
Motion  by  Mr.  Dempster,  for  establishing  rules 

to  be  observed  in  making  Ordinances,  rejected,  211 


XXV 

1774. 

June 

10, 


13, 


CONTENTS. 


XXVI 


June 
17, 


22, 


Motion  by  Mr.  Charles  Fox,  to  secure  to  tlie 
Religious  orders,  their  rights  and  properties, 

rejected,  

Motion  by  Mr.  Dempster,  to  give  the  Canadians 
claiming  it,  the  benefit  of  Habeas  Corpus  and 
Bail,  rejected,     ------ 

Bill  read  the  third  time,  -         -         -         - 

Mr.  Cooper's  motion  that  the  Bill  do  pass. 
Debate — Mr.  Charles  Fox,      .... 

Mr.  Cooper, 

Mr.  Ho^vard,     ..... 
The  Bill  passed, 

House  of  Lords. 

Motion  to  agree  to  the  Amendments  made  by  the 
House  of  Commons,    -         -        .         .         - 

Debate — Lord  Chatham,  .        .         .         - 

Lord  Dartmouth,  .... 
Lord  Lyttelton,  .... 

Amendments  agreed  to,       - 

Lords  in  the  minority,  .... 

Petition  of  the  City  of  London  to  the  King, 
against  the  Bill,  ..... 

The  King's  assent  to  the  Bill,  -         .         -         - 

The  King's  Speech  to  both  Houses  of  Parlia- 
ment,   

"  An  Act  for  making  more  effectual  provision  for 
the  government  of  the  Province  of  Quebeck,  in 
North  America," 

"  An  Act  to  prevent  the  E.xportation  to  Foreign 
parts  of  Utensils  made  use  of  in  the  Cotton, 
Linen,  Woollen  and  Silk  Manufactures  of  this 
Kingdom," 


211 


211 
211 
211 
211 
211 
211 
211 


211 
211 
212 
212 
214 
214 

215 
216 

216 


216 


220 


1774 


MISCELLANEOUS  CORRESPONDENCE. 

March  Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan,  Agent,  to  the  Hon.  John 
1 1,  Erving,  and  others.  Committee  of  the  Council 

of  Massachusetts.  The  King's  Message  of 
March  7 — the  publication  of  his  late  Petition 
to  the  King — prepares  a  Petition  for  the  Hotise 
of  Commons — General  Conway  and  Sir 
George  Savile  decline  presenting  it — the  Lord 
Mayor  consents  to  present  it,  -  -  -  225 
15,  Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan  to  the  Committee.  His 
Petition  presented  by  Sir  Joseph  Mawbey. 
The  right  of  Parliament  to  Tax  the  Americans 
denied  by  Lord  Camden,      -         -         -         -     227 

17,  Letter  continued.      Lord   North's  policy  in  re- 

gard to  the  Colonies. — Interview  with  Lord 
Camden,  228 

18,  Letter  from  Arthur  Lee,   London,  to  Richard 

Henry  Lee.  Order  of  the  House  of  Com- 
mons for  leave  to  bring  in  the  Boston  Port  Bill. 
Recommends  prudence  and  firmness  to  the  Co- 
lonies. Lord  North's  declaration,  that  he  would 
not  listen  to  complaints  from  America,  until 
she  was  at  his  feet.     Character  of  Lord  North,     228 

22,  Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan  to  the  Committee.      Re- 

fused a  hearing  by  the  House,  on  hi.s  Petition. 
The  Port  Bill  read  a  second  time.  The  Lord 
Mayor  and  Sir  Joseph  Mawbey  offer  to  pre- 
sent another  Petition,  ....     229 

23,  Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan  to  the  Committee.     Has 

prepared  his  second  Petition.  Sir  Jos.  Maw- 
bey took  it  to  present  to  the  Hou.se.  Objec- 
tions of  the  Speaker  and  Clerk.  The  presen- 
tation deferred,  230 

31,  Letter  from  a  Gentleman  in  London  to  his  friend 
at  Annapolis,  Md.  Encloses  the  Boston  Port 
Bill.  Little  opposition  to  it  in  the  House  of 
Commons.  The  rise  or  fall  of  America  now 
depends  on  the  deliberations  of  a  General  Con- 
gress from  the  Colonies.  A  suspension  of 
Exports  and  Imports  recorMnended.  If  Bos- 
ton acquiesces  the  whole  will  be  forced  to  sub- 
mission,       230 

April  Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan  to  the  Committee.    After 
2,  various  difficulties  his  Petition  to  the  House 

of  Lords  was  presented,  and  he  was  called  in 
and  heard  in  support  of  it.  General  Gage 
appointed  Governour  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  231 
Letter  from  Mr.  Bollan  to  the  Committee.  Re- 
sumes his  account  of  the  proceedings  on  the 
Port  Bill.  His  second  Petition  to  the  House 
of  Commons  presented  by  Alderman  Crosby. 
Large  majority  against  receiving  it.  The  Bill 
passed  by  the  House  of  Commons.    Interview 


with  Lord  Temple.  The  Earl  of  Stair  the  first 
who  spoke  in  favour  of  the  Colonies  in  the 
House  of  Lords.  Lord  Stair  refers  him  to  the 
Duke  of  Richmond  to  present  his  Petition. — 
The  Duke  of  Richmond  refers  him  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Interview  with  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.  Petition  presented  by  Lord 
Stair.  Mr.  Bollan  heard  at  the  Bar  of  the 
House,  in  support  of  his  Petition.      The  Lords 

pass  the  Bill, 231-235 

April    Letter  from  Dr.  Franklin,  London,  to  Thomas 

2,  Cushing.     After  his  treatment  at  the  Council 

Board  he  had  ceased  to  act  as  Agent.  Greater 
opposition  to  the  Boston  Port  Bill  in  the  House 
of  Lords  than  in  the  House  of  Commons.  Pe- 
titions of  the  Natives  of  America  dravvTi  up 
by  Mr.  Lee.  Encloses  a  Letter  from  Leeds, 
dated  March  20 — alarm  of  the  Manufacturers 
— Emigrations  to  America,  -         -         -     235 

2,  Letter  from  Arthur  Lee,  Loudon,  to  Francis  L. 
Lee.  Punishment  of  Boston  first  step  towards 
reducing  all  America  to  an  acknowledgement 
of  the  right  of  Parliament  to  Tax  the  Colonies, 
and  to  a  submission  to  the  exercise  of  that  right. 
General  Gage  appointed  Governour  of  Mas- 
sachusetts to  reduce  the  people  to  entire  obedi- 
ence. Recommends  a  General  Congress  of 
the  Colonies,  at  Annapolis,  and  a  suspension 
of  Exports  and  Imports,        ....      237 

4,  Letter  from  Samuel  Adams,  to  Arthur  Lee.   Pro- 

ceedings of  the  Assembly,  in  relation  to  the 
Judges'  salaries.  Judge  Oliver  refuses  to  re- 
nounce the  salary  from  the  Crown — Contro- 
versy between  the  Governour  and  the  Assem- 
bly. Policy  of  the  British  Government,  if 
persisted  in,  will  bring  about  the  entire  separa- 
tion and  Independence  of  the  Colonies,         -     238 

5,  Importance  of  the  Commerce  of  the  Colonics 

to  the  Trade  and  Manufactures  of  Great  Bri- 
tain. Value  of  Exports  from  the  West  India 
Islands  and  the  Northern  Colonies  compared. 
Troops  furnished  by  the  Colonies  in  the  last 
war, 240 

5,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  The  wisdom  and  firmness  of  the  Uni- 
ted Continent  of  America  must  be  summoned 
to  support  their  liberty.  If  Boston  is  not  sus- 
tained, all  the  rest  will  fall  the  easy  victims  of 
Tyranny.  The  Sheriffs  of  London  headed  the 
Petitions  to  Parliament;  they  were  the  first 
in  proposing,  and  active  in  getting  them  uj),       24 1 

7,      An  Apology  for  the  late  conduct  of  America,  241-245 

9,  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Governour 
Gage.  Sends  his  Commission,  as  Captain- 
General  and  Governour-in- Chief  of  Massachu- 
setts Bay,  with  his  Instructions ;  He  must  en- 
force due  obedience  to  the  Boston  Port  Bill — if 
necessary,  must  use  the  King's  Troops  with 
effect.  The  Governour  to  reside  in  Salem,  and 
the  General  Court  to  be  held  there,  until  the 
King  shall  authorize  their  return  to  Boston. 
His  Majesty  expects  the  offenders  (in  the  de- 
struction of  the  "Tea)  to  be  punished,  -  -  245 
March  Copy  of  a  Minute  of  the  Treasury  Board,  (en. 

31,  -.••'■         •       X    ..     V     T    .      .. 


April 
27, 


closed  in  the  foregoing  Letter.)  Listructions 
to  the  Officers  of  the  Customs,  on  removing  the 
Port  from  Boston  to  Salem,  -         -         - 

Letter  from  London.  Advises  the  Colonies  to 
imite  in  defence  of  American  Liberty.  Power 
of  the  Ministry — their  hatred  of  liberty.  Lords 
Chatham,  Camden,  and  Rockingham,  are 
friendly  to  America,  .  -  -  -  . 
May  4,  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Colden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Destruction  of  Tea  at 
New- York,       ------ 

Account  of  the  Proceedings  at  New- York,  on 
the  arrival  of  Captains  Chambers  and  Lock- 
yer,  with  the  Tea,  (enclosed  in  the  preceding 
Letter,) 

Account  of  all  the  Proceedings  in  New- York,  in 
relation  to  the  Tea,  (Note,)  -        -      251 


April 
28, 


May 
12, 


-     246 

248 
248 


249 
-256 


COTJNCII,  OF  PENNSYLVANIA. 

March  Governour  submits  a  Letter  from  Lord  Dim- 

16,         more, 252 

3,     Letter  from  Lord  Dunmore,  Governour  of  Vir- 
ginia, to  Governour  Penn.  Claims  Pittsburgh, 


XXVil 

1774. 


CONTENTS. 


XXVIII 


252 


March 
31, 


24, 


April 
11. 


8, 


7. 
11, 

21, 
9, 


21, 


22, 


261 


261 


OS  within  the  County  of  Augusta,  to  be  under 
the  jurisdiction  of  Vi'rsriniu— Refuses  to  revoke 
the  Commissions  to  Officers  he  has  appointed 
there — Di>mands  ample  reparation  for  the  in- 
sult on  his  Majesty's  CJovernment  in  Virginia, 
in  the  imprisonment  of  Mr.  John  Connollj',  a 
Magistrate  appointed  by  him,         .         .         - 
Answer  of  Governour  Penn,  to  the  Earl  of  Dun- 
more.     Review  of  the   respective  claims  of 
Pennsylvania  and  Virginia,  in  regard  to  the 
disputtxl  Botmdary.     Claims  Pittsburgh  to  be 
within  the  Charter  limits  of  Pennsylvania- 
justifies  the  conduct  of  Mr.  St.  Clair,  in  impri- 
soning Connolly,         ...         -      255-260 
Letter  from  Jonathan  Trumbull,  Esquire,  Gov- 
ernour of  Connecticut,  to  Governour  Penn. — 
Connecticut  Umds  West  of  the  River  Dela- 
ware— requests  Governour   Penn   to   prevent 
settlements  under  claim  of  the  Proprietaries  of 
Pennsylvania.     Has  employed  persons  to  take 
the  lautudes  of  certain  places  beyond  the  Dek- 
^\•are,         ...---- 

Letter  from    Governour    Penn   to    Governour 
Trumbull,  ■written  by  advice  of  the  Council. 
Denies  the  claim  of  Connecticut  to  Lands  be- 
yond the  Delaware.  Protests  against  the  send- 
ing of  persons  to  take  latitudes  of  places  with- 
in  the  jurisdiction  of  Pennsyh'ania,  and  denies 
the  authority  of  the  Assembly  of  Connecticut 
to  do  so. 
Letter  from  William  Crawford,  Westmoreland 
County,  to  Mr.  Penn.     Connolly  sworn  in  a 
Magistrate  of  Augusta  County,  Virginia :  he 
was  furnished   with  blank  Commissions  for 
several  gentlemen  near  Pittsburgh.      A  num- 
ber of   Militia    Officers  appointed  there   by 
Lord  Dunmore.      Several  musters  of  Militia 
have  been    held.      Connolly  constantly  sur- 
rounded   with  a    body  of  armed  men — and 
obstructs  the  execution  of  legal  process  under 
the  authority  of  Pennsylvania.      Disturbances 
there — arrest  and  confinement  of  Pennsylvania 
Magistrates — Connolly  surrounds  the  Court 
House  with  Troops— places  Centinels  at  the 
door — has  a  private  interview  with  the  Magis- 
trates.   Further  disturbances.    Persons  arrest- 
ed by  Connolly.  Mr.  Crawford  recommends  to 
the  Governour  to  fix  a  temporary  Boundary 
line,  ...---- 

Dr.  Connolly's  Address  to  the   Magistrates  of 
Westmoreland  County,  at  his  interview  with 
them,  referred  to  in  the  preceding  Letter, 
Answer  of  the   Magistrates  of    Westmoreland 

County  to  the  foregoing  Address, 
Deposition  of  Henry  Read,  relative  to  the  Distur- 
bances made  in  Westmoreland  County  by  the 
Virginians,         ..---- 

Governour  advised  by  the  Council  to  take  no  steps 
in  relation  to  the  Disturbances,  until  the  return 
of  an  Express  sent  to  the  Earl  of  Dunmore,     - 
Express  sent  to  Virginia  returned  without  any 
Answer  from  the  Governour,        .         .         - 
Letter  from  ^Eneas  Muckoy,  Pittsburgh,  to  the 
Governour.  Taken  prisoner  by  Dr.  Connolly, 
and,  on  refusing  to  give  bail,  ordered  to  be  sent 
to  Staunton,       ...... 

Letter  from  Devereux  Smith,  Pittsburgh,  one  of 
the  Magistrates  of  Westmoreland  County,  ar. 
rested  on  a  King's  Warrant  issued  by  Dr.  Con. 
nolly.     Will  go  to  Jail  at  Staunton  this  day. 
The  Council,  after  considering  the  foregoing  Let- 
ters, advise  the  Governour  to  send  Commis- 
sioners to  the  Governour  of  Virginia  to  con- 
fer with  that  Government  on  the  means  of  re- 
storing peace  and  good  order,  and  the  establish- 
ment of  a  temporary  line  of  jurisdiction. 
Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  /Eneas  Mnckay, 
Devereux  Smith,  and  Andrew  M'Farlane. — 
Will  apply  to  Lord  Dunmore  for  their  enlarge- 
ment— and  has  instructed  Colonel  Wilson  to 
give  bail,  to  release  them  from  Prison  at  Staun- 
ton, ....... 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  William  Craw- 
ford, and  his  Associates,  of  Westmoreland 
County.  Will  send  Commissioners  to  expos- 
tulate with  Lord  Dunmore  on  the  behaviour 
of  the  persons  he  has  invested  with  power  to 
disturb  the  peace  of  the  country.    As  the  Gov- 


1774. 


262 


263 


263 


263 


264 


264 


264 


264 


265 


265 


crnment  of  Virginia  has  the  power  to  raise 
Militia,  and  there  is  no  such  in  Pennsylvania, 
it  will  be  vain  to  contend  with  them  in  the 
way  of  force.  The  Magistrates  are,  therefore, 
advised  to  conduct  themselves  \vith  caution, 
and  not  to  proceed  with  criminal  prosecutions 
asrainst  persons  acting  under  the  authority  of 
Virginia,  -         -         -         -         *         " 

Jan'ry  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Jo- 
15,  seph  Shippen.  Petition  for  a  Court  House 
and  Jail,  in  Westmoreland  County, 

Feb'ry  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Gov 


2, 


23, 


April 
4, 


4, 


7, 


13, 


ernour  Penn.  Dr.  Connolly  arrested  by  his 
orders,  for  requiring  the  Militia  to  meet.  R-iot- 
ous  conduct  of  persons  under  arms.  Mr.  Con- 
nolly has  a  Military  Commission  from  Lord 
Dunmore,  and  his  Subalterns  are  appointed. 

Paper  enclosed  in  the  foregoing  Letter,  read  to  a 
party  assembled  in  arms,  after  Connollys  arrest 
by  the  Magistrates  of  Westmoreland  County, 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Jo- 
seph Shippen,  Junior.  Disturbances  are  in- 
creasing. The  People,  principally,  in  favour 
of  Virginia.  Intends  to  remove  his  office  to 
Pittsburgh, 

Letter  from  Joseph  Spear  to  Arthur  St.  Clair. 
Virginians  have  had  several  musters  \ait\y, 
one  at  Red  Stone,  Old  Fort.  Connolly  has  just 
gone  to  Red  Stone,      .         .         -         -         - 

Letter  from  TEneas  Mackay,  Pittsburgh,  to  Gov. 
Penn.  Since  Comiolly's  return  from  Virginia, 
on  the  28th  of  March,  Pittsburgh  has  become  a 
scene  of  confusion.  Connolly  arrested  on  the 
24th  of  January,  and  in  prison  a  few  days, 
when  he  prevailed  upon  the  Sheriff  to  let  him 
out  to  see  his  friends;  instead  of  returning  to 
Jail,  as  he  had  promised,  he  assembled  a  party 
of  armed  men,  who  guarded  him  from  Red 
Stone  to  the  frontiers  of  Virginia.  Connolly,  on 
the  30th  of  March,  read  to  the  Militia,  assem- 
bli:>d  at  Fort  Pitt,  Letters  from  Lord  Dunmore, 
approving  his  conduct,  and  promising  him  as- 
sistance. The  men  were  assembled  in  obedi- 
ence to  Lord  Dunmore's  positive  orders,  to  hear 
the  Letters  read.  Connolly  arrested  the  Sheriff 
the  next  day,  by  a  King's  Warrant,  and  has 
had,  ever  since,  armed  parties  in  pursuit  of  the 
Deputy  SherifT  and  the  Constables;  he  is  now 
in  acUial  possession  of  the  Fort,  with  a  guard, 
invested  with  Ci\'il  and  Military  power  to  en- 
force the  laws  of  Virginia — Lord  Dunmore  has 
enclosed  him  Commissions  to  fill  up,  at  his  dis- 
cretion, for  Militia  Officers.  Indians  alarmed 
at  seeing  parties  of  armed  men  daily. 

Letter  from  GJeorge  Croghan  to  David  Sample 
has  long  been  convinced  that  Fort  Pitt,  and  its 
dependencies,  are  without  the  limits  of  Penn- 
sylvania— will  no  longer  submit  to  the  laws  of 
tiiat  Province ;  Virginia  having,  last  Winter, 
extended  the  laws  of  that  Government  to  this 
part  of  the  country, 

Letter  from  Thomas  Smith  to  Joseph  Shippen. 
Disturbances  in  Westmoreland  County.  Con- 
nolly's proceedings — Officers  appointed  by 
him,  under  Lord  Dunmore's  authority, 

Representation  of  the  Commissioners  and  Asses- 
sors of  Westmoreland  County  to  Gov.  Penn, 

Letter  from  Tliomas  Smith,  Bedford,  to  Joseph 
Shippen,  Jun.  Continued  outrages  of  the  Vir- 
ginians. Three  Magistrates  of  Westmoreland 
County  arrested  by  Connolly,  and  now  on  their 
way  to  Augusta  Jail,  .... 


266 


266 


266 


267 


269 


.    269 


-     270 


271 


271 


273 


273 


VIRGINIA  ASSEMBLY. 

May  5,  Virginia  Assembly,  convened  by  the  Governour,  274 
Speech  of  Lord  Dunmore  to  CTeneral  Assembly,  274 
Address  of  the  Council  to  Lord  Dunmore,           .  274 
Address  of  the  House  of  Burgesses  to  Lord  Dun- 
more,          275 

12,  Information,  by  Express,  of  skirmishes  with  the 

Shawanese,         ......     275 

1 3,  Petition  from  the  Inhabitants  on  the  Waters  of  the 

f  )hio,  to  the  Governour  and  Assembly.  Prefer 
the  Government  of  Virginia  to  that  of  Peim- 
sylvania.  State  their  grievances,  their  fears  of 
the  neighbouring  Indians,  and  request  the  As- 
sembly to  extend  to  them  relief,      ...    275 


XXIX 

1774. 

May 

13, 


CONTENTS. 


XXX 


Address  of  the  House  of  Burgesses  to  the  Govern- 
our  on  the  foregoing-  Petition.  Disapprove  the 
imprisoning  Officers  by  either  Government. 
Recommend  a  temporary  boundary  until  the 
King  shall  direct  a  proper  line  to  be  fixed  upon. 
Request  the  Ciovernour  to  exercise  the  powers 
he  is  invested  with  to  suppress  the  Indian  dis- 
turbances, ...--.  276 
March  "  A  Virginian,"  approving  the  conduct  of  Lord 

3,         E>unmore,(Note,) 277 

26,  Letter  from  Pittsburgh.  No  disturbances  with  the 
Indians  this  Winter.  More  to  be  dreaded  from 
the  Pennsylvanians  than  the  Indians,  (Note,)  -     277 

"Virginius"  to  Lord  Dunmore.  An  Indian  war 
inevitable.  Urges  the  Governour  to  make  pro- 
vision for  the  security  of  the  frontier  inhabi- 
tants, and  be  ready  to  meet  the  Indians,  (Note,)     277 

Connolly  will  be  at  Pittsburgh  till  the  middle  of 
June  to  dispose  of  lots  in  a  new  Town,  to  be 
laid  out,  at  the  Falls  of  the  Ohio,  (Note,)  -     278 


24, 


April 
7, 


COUNCIL  OF  PENNSYLVANIA. 

May  7,  Mr.  Tilghman  and  Mr.  Andrew  Allen  appointed 
Commissioners  to  treat  \vith  Virginia,  on  the 
Disturbances  in  Westmoreland  County,  -     277 

7,     Commission  to  Mr.   Tilghman  and  Mr.  Allen, 

Commissioners  to  Virginia,  ...  278 
7,  Instructions  to  the  Commissioners,  ...  279 
7,  Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Lord  Dimmore. 
Informs  him  of  the  appointment  of  the  Commis- 
sioners, and  expresses  his  hopes  that  tranquil- 
lity may  be  restored  between  the  Governments,  280 
1 8,  Letter  from  Doctor  Richard  Peters  to  Henry  Wil- 
mot,  London.  History  of  the  purchsise,  by 
Pennsylvania,  imderthe  Indian  Deed  of  1754, 
of  the  Lands  west  of  the  Delaware,  claimed 
by  Connecticut.  The  Pennsylvania  purchase 
made  openly  in  Council ;  the  Susquehannah 
purchase,  by  private  individuals,  from  Connec- 
ticut, made  secretly.  The  Indians,  in  Council, 
refused  to  sell  any  land  to  Connecticut,  and  re- 
fused to  sell  the  Wyomink  Country  to  either 
Pennsylvania  or  Connecticut.  Treaty  at  Fort 
Stanwix,  in  1768, 280 

April  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Carlisle,  to  Ben- 
28,  jamin  Chew.  Colonel  Stephens  censured  by 
the  Council  of  Virginia,  in  1 764,  for  sending 
the  Militia  out  of  that  Government,  when  he 
sent  relief  to  Fort  Pitt,  then  besieged  by  the 
Indians, 282 

May  5,  Letter  from  iEneas  Mackay,  Staunton,  to  Gov- 
ernour Penn.  Interview  with  Lord  Dunmore 
in  relation  to  the  claim  of  Virginia  to  Pitts- 
burgh, and  the  proceedings  of  Connolly.  Lord 
Dunmore  justified  Connolly,  who  acted  by  his 
authority.  Gave  Mr.  Mackay  a  Letter  to  the 
Sheriff  of  Augusta,  directuig  the  discharge  of 
the  Pennsylvania  Magistrates  imprisoned  by 
Connolly, 282 

April    Letter  from  Lord   Dunmore,  Williamsburg,  to 
26,         Daniel  Smith,  Sheriff  of  Augusta,  directing 

the  discharge  of  the  Pennsylvania  Magistrates,  283 
25,  Lord  Dunmore's  Proclamation — Directs  the  Mi- 
litia of  Pittsburgh,  and  its  dependencies,  to  be 
embodied  to  repel  any  attacks  from  Pennsylva- 
nia, or  the  Indians ;  and  orders  all  the  inhabi- 
tants to  pay  quit-rents,  and  all  publick  dues,  to 
Officers  appointed  by  Virginia,  -  -  -  283 
30,  Extract  of  a  Journal  of  the  United  Brethren's 
Mission,  on  Muskingum — Shawanese  Chief 
killed  by  the  Whites,  on  the  Ohio — Indian  war 
expected ;  Virginians,  on  the  Ohio,  threaten  to 
fall  on  the  Shawanese  settlements,  and  destroy 
their  Towns.  White  people  on  the  Ohio  had 
killed  nine  Mingoes.  At  Pittsburgh  it  is  not 
believed  this  was  done  by  authority  of  the  Gov- 
ernour of  Virginia.  Indian  Council  at  Geke- 
lemuckepuck:  Shawanese  and  Mingoes  left  it 
dissatisfied,  and  threatened  to  kill  all  the  White 
people  they  met.  Messenger  from  Mr.  Crogh- 
an,  at  Pittsburgh,  to  the  Delawares,  Shawa- 
nese, and  Mingoes,  advising  them  to  be  quiet. 
The  people  there  will  endeavour  to  apprehend 
the  Whites  who  committed  the  murder.  Hopes 
entertained  of  a  continuance  of  peace,  -     283 

May     Letter  from  a  Missionary — More  Traders  arriv- 
21,        cd, 284 


1774. 

Maij 

24, 

27, 


24, 


29, 


Litter  from  David  Zeisburgcr,  Missionary  at 
Schonbrunn.  Movements  of  the  Indians:  Pre- 
paration for  war  with  the  Whites,  -         -     285 

Letter  from  Mr.  Zeisburger.  Two  parties  of  the 
Shawanese  gone  against  the  settlements.  The 
Shawanese  at  Woaketameka,  only  want  war. 
Lower  Shawanese  peaceable  yet,  -         -     285 

Letter  from  the  Cosh,  alias  John  Bull.  Three 
Cherokees  have  killed  a  trader.  Mingoes  kil- 
led by  Virginians  under  Cresap,  at  the  mouth 
of  Yellow  Creek.  The  day  following  they 
killed  a  Shawanese  and  a  Delaware.  Same 
party  killed  a  Shawanese  woman,  and  a  Shaw- 
anese Chief;  soon  after  fled,  and  left  the  settlers 
victims  to  the  Indians.  Indian  Council  at 
Woaketameka — Delaware  Chief  informed  the 
Shawanese  and  Mingoes  that  the  Delawares 
would  not  assist  them,  ....     285 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernor  Penn.  The  Shawanese  inclined  to  peace 
with  the  Pennsylvanians.  The  Virginians 
have  struck  them  and  they  will  have  satisfac- 
tion. Met  several  Chiefs  of  the  Delawares  and 
the  Deputy  of  the  Six  Nations,  at  Pittsburgh; 
they  gave  assurances  of  their  desire  for  peace. 
Number  of  Indians  killed  by  Cresap  and  (Jreat- 
house,  thirteen.  Cresap  lately  at  Pittsburgh, 
with  intention  to  pursue  the  blow  he  had 
struck;  but  Connolly  forbid  his  attempting  any 
thing  against  the  Indians.  Cresap  declares 
what  he  did  before  was  by  Connolly's  orders. 
An  Indian  war,  if  not  a  Virginia  plan,  is  cer- 
tainly Connolly's  plan.  Country  about  Pitts- 
burgh harassed  by  the  Virginia  Militia.  Sev- 
eral at  Pittsburgh  have  associated  and  raised, 
and  pay  a  company  of  one  hundred  Rangers. 
Inhabitants  of  Pittsburgh  propose  to  stockade 
the  Town.  Delaware  Indian  killed  by  John 
Hinckson,  and  others,  ....     286 

Speech  of  the  Shawanese,  directed  to  Alexander 
McKee,  George  Croghan,  and  the  Comman. 
dant  at  Pittsburgh,  Captain  John  Connolly,     .     288 

Speech  to  the  Chiefs  of  the  Delawares  and  a  few 
of  the  Six  Nations,  by  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at 
Pittsburgh,  May,  1774,         .         -         .         .283 


MISCELLANEOUS  CORRESPONDENCE. 

May  Letter  from  General  Haldimand,  New- York,  to 
15,  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  The  accounts  receiv. 
ed,  had  made  known  the  plan  of  operation  in- 
tended to  bring  Boston  to  a  sense  of  order  and 
decency,  so  that  when  General  Gcage  arrives 
they  will  know  what  to  expect  if  they  prove 
refractory.  Many  believe  in  New. York,  that 
the  people  of  Boston  vnU.  acknowledge  their 
fault,  and  pay  for  the  Tea,  ... 

April    Extracts  of  private  Let  ers  from  London,  printed 


7, 


May 
16, 


on  the  back  of  the  Boston  Port  Bill,  and  circu- 
lated in  New- York,  on  the  1 4th  of  May,  en- 
closed to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  in  the  prece- 
ding Letter, 

A  "  British  American,"  New- York,  proposes  to 
raise  by  subscription  money  to  pay  for  the  Tea, 
ready  to  be  tendered  to  General  Gage,  on  his 
arrival.  Hostile  opposition  to  the  Naval  and 
Military  Force  coming  out  with  General  Gage, 
absurd,  (Note,) 


KEW-YORK  COMMITTEE  OF  CORRESPONDENCE. 


May 
16, 

17, 

ir, 


19, 


289 


289 


289 


20, 


New- York  Committee  of  Correspondence,         -     293 

Committee  nominated  at  a  Publick  Meeting  at 
the  Exchange,  .... 

Meeting  called  for  the  19th,  to  approve  of  the 
Committee  nominated  on  the  1 6th, 

Express  from  Boston,  with  Letters  from  the  Com- 
nrittee  of  Correspondence  there,  suggesting  the 
suspension  of  all  Exports  to,  and  Imports  irom. 
Great  Britain  and  the  West  Indies,  (Note,) 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  at  the  Coiiee  House, 

Address  of  Mr.  Low  to  the  meeting. 

The  nomination  of  the  fifty  gentlemen  for  a  Com- 
mittee, on  the  16th,  confirmed,  and  Francis 
Lewis  added,      ..---- 

Address  to  the  People,  urging  them  to  sustain 
Boston,  (Note,)  .... 

Dialogue  on  the  Boston  Port  Bill— Conduct  of 


.    293 
294 


293 

294 
294 


295 
-    295 


XXXI 


CONTENTS. 


XXXII 


1774. 


May 
23. 


23, 


24, 


30, 


30, 


31, 


31, 


June 
I, 
3. 


the  Bostonians  justified— Procerdings  of  the 
Ministry  condemned — Non-Importation  Agree- 
ment recommended,  f  Note,)  -         -         - 

Isaac  Low  chosen  Chairman  of  the  Committee ; 
John  Alsop  Deputy  Chairman,     -         -         - 

LeUer  from  Jonathan  Blake,  Chairman  of  the 
Committee  of  Mechanicks,  exprcssinsrtheir  con- 
currence in  the  appointment  of  the  Committee, 

Letters  from  Boston  Committee  of  the  13th,  and 
a  Letter  from  the  Philadelphia  Committee  read, 

Committee  appointed  to  prepare  an  Answer  to  the 
Boston  Letter,  and  to  report  this  evening. 

Letter  to  the  Boston  Committee  reported  and  ap- 
proved. EHfficult  to  determine  what  course 
ought  to  be  pursued.  Cannot  give  a  decisive 
opinion.  Congress  of  Deputies  from  all  the 
Colonies  ought  to  be  convened  without  delay. 
The  Committee  cannot  express  any  opinion  on 
the  exp.<lient  proposed  by  the  Boston  Com- 
mittee,        " 

Copy  of  this  Letter  ordered  to  be  sent  to  Philadel- 
phia, ackjiowledging  the  receipt  of  a  copy  of 
their  Letter  to  Boston,  and  approving  the  sen- 
timents contaim-d  in  it,        -        -         '       .* 

Letter  from  Mr.  Low,  Chairman,  to  Philadelphia 

Committee,        "        *        "         '         j        i' 
Rules  of  proceeding  for  the  Committee  adopted, 
Joseph  Allicocke  appointed  Secretary, 
Committee  appointed  to  write  a  Circular  Letter  to 
Supervisors  of  Counties,  recommending  the  ap- 
pointment of  persons  to  correspond  with  this 
Committee,         -         -         -         -         ■ 
Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Lon- 
don.    Many  of  the  principal  people  of  the  Co- 
lony are  sorry  for  embarking  in  the  cause  so 
far,  and  are  ready  to  join  the  friends  of  the 
Ministry.      The  Minister,  with  a  few  Ships-of- 
War,  could  carry  his  designs  into  execution, 

(Note,) 

Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Lon- 
don. General  Gage  hissed  at  a  publick  dinner 
in  Boston,  for  giving  Governour  Hutchinson  as 
a  toast.  Respect  shown  to  General  Gage  on 
his  landing,  all  hypocrisy.  The  Presbj-terian 
Junto,  or  self-constituted  Committee  of  Sons  of 
Liberty  of  New- York,  who  have  stood  ever 
since  the  Stamp  Act,  offered  the  assistance  of 
this  City  to  Boston,  in  resisting  the  Parliament ; 
in  consequence  of  this  Letter  the  gentlemen  of 
property  met  and  formed  the  new  Committee  of 
Fifty.  There  is  little  doubt  but  all  will  be 
quiet  in  the  Colonies  in  a  short  time ;  the  most 
bitter  pill  will  be  the  acknowledgement  of  the 
right  of  Taxation  in  the  Parliament.  The 
Presbyterians  are  to  blame  for  all  the  violent 
American  Proceedings.  The  Government  at 
home,  can  only  rely  upon  the  professors  of  the 
Church  of  Englandi.  The  Ministry  have  only 
to  put  an  entire  stop  to  smuggling,  and  make  an 
example  of  some  of  the  factious  ringleaders  in 
every  principal  city ;  then  America  will  give 
but  little  trouble,  (Note,)  ...  - 
Letter  received  from  Charles  Thomson,  Phila- 
delphia, in  behalf  of  the  several  Congregations 
in  that  city,  dated  May  29,  ... 

Copies  of   Mr.   Thomson's  Letter  furnished  to 
the  Clergymen  of  New- York,      .         -         - 
Letter  from  Isaac  Low,  Chairman,  to  Charles 
Thomson,  ...--. 

Letter  from  the  Committee  to  the  Supervisors  of 

the  Counties, 

Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Scot- 
land. The  power  thrown  into  the  hands  of  the 
Mob  at  the  Stamp  Act,  was  not  extinguished  by 
the  repeal  of  that  Act.  It  was  the  leaders  of 
the  Mob.  who  associated  to  prevent  the  landing 
of  the  Tea  here,  and  for  returning  it — which 
they  deliberately  effected.  The  Committee  of 
Fifty  was  elwAed  in  opposition  to  these  leaders, 
with  some  difficulty.  The  management  of 
affairs  is  now  in  the  hands  of  men  opposed  to 
precipitate  measures,  and  the  Ministry  will  meet 
with  little  opposition,  unless  the  Bill  for  the 
Administration  of  Justice  in  Massachusetts  Bay 
should  be  passed,  (Note,)  -  .  .  . 
Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Eng- 
land. The  pretensions  of  Great  Britain  will  be 
treated  with  resentment  and  disdain  throughout 


295 
295 

295 
295 
295 


-    297 


298 


298 
298 
299 


299 


299 


1774. 


June 
6, 
4. 


7, 


10, 
3, 


10, 
11, 


11, 

24, 


299 

300 
300 
300 
300 


20, 


27, 


29, 


Juhj 


302 


302 
302 

303 


303 

304 


304 
305 


305 
306 


the  Continent.  The  strongest  determination 
exists  through  all  America  to  maintain  and 
defend  their  rights,  (Note,)  .         .         - 

The  Committee  order  a  Letter  to  be  written  to 
the  Boston  Committee,  .         .         -         - 

Anniversary  of  his  Majesty's  birth-day.  Cele- 
brated by  the  King's  Officers.  Few  of  the 
people  participated  in  the  rejoicing,  (Note,)     - 

Letter  from  the  Committee  to  Boston  Committee 
of  Correspondence.  In  their  former  Letter  did 
not  propose  a  suspension  of  Trade.  Left  that 
and  every  other  resolution  for  the  discussion 
of  the  proposed  General  Congress — adhering 
to  that  measure  as  most  conducive  to  promote 
the  grand  system  of  politicks  we  all  have  in 
view.  Ready  to  meet  at  any  time  and  place  that 
may  be  appointed,  giving  sufficient  time  for 
Deputies  as  far  south  as  the  Carolinas  to  as- 
semble,    ..----- 

Letter  received  from  the  Committee  of  Correspon- 
dence for  Connecticut,  dated  June  4,       - 

Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Connecticut  Commit- 
tee to  the  Boston  Committee,  enclosed  in  the 
preceding  Letter  to  New- York.  A  Congress 
absolutely  necessary — Should  meet  by  the  first 
week  in  August — New- York  a  convenient 
place,  but  prefer  Fairfield  or  Norwalk, 

Committee  direct  Letters  to  be  written  to  the 
Committee  at  Hartford,  and  to  the  Committee 
of  South  Carolina,     -         .         -         -         - 

Letter  to  the  Conunittce  of  Connecticut — Ap- 
prove of  the  Congress,  chosen  to  speak  the 
sentiments,  and  to  pledge  themselves  for  the 
conduct  of  the  Colonies  they  represent, 

I^etter  to  Mr.  Bernard  Lentot,  of  Branford, 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 
the  Assembly  of  New- York,  to  the  Connecti- 
cut Committee.  A  Congress  the  best  means 
of  restoring  peace  and  harmony  with  Great 
Britain ;  but  this  Committee  have  no  power  to 
take  any  steps  in  relation  to  the  subject.  If  a 
Congress  should  meet  in  or  near  New- York, 
will  assist  with  their  advice,  .         .         - 

Appointment  of  the  Committee  by  the  Assem- 
bly of  New- York,  (Note)  -         -         -         - 

Mr.  Allicocke,  for  particular  reasons,  resigned, 
and  John  Blagge  appointed  Secretary  to  the 
Committee  in  his  place,        -         .         .         . 

Letters  received  from  Easthampton,  dated  June 
17;  from  Philadelphia,  dated  June  21;  and 
from  Boston,  dated  Jime  16,  ... 

Mr.  M'Dougall's  motion  on  the  most  eligible 
mode  of  appointing  Deputies  to  the  Congress, 
debated  and  postponed  to  the  29th, 

Letters  from  Tryon  County,  dated  June  22,  and 
from  Southampton,  dated  June  22,  received.    - 

Mr.  M'Dougall  moved,  and  was  seconded  by  Mr. 
Broome,  that  the  Committee  proceed  imme- 
diately to  nominate  five  Deputies  for  the  City 
and  County  of  New- York,  to  represent  them 
in  a  Convention  of  the  Colony,  or  in  the  Gen- 
eral Congress,  and  that  their  names  be  sent  to 
the  Committee  of  Mechanicks  for  their  concur- 
rence; to  be  proposed  to  the  Inhabitants  on 
Tuesday  next,  for  their  approbation, 

Postponed  to  Monday  next,  July  4,  '        • 

4,  Letters  from  Annapolis,  dated  June  26,  with  Re- 
solves ;  from  Shelter  Island,  dated  June  7,  with 
Resolves;  from  Suffolk  County,  dated  June 
25 ;  from  the  Committee  of  Mechanicks  of 
New- York,  dated  July  4  ;  also  from  Dutchess 
County,  dated  June  '29,  received, 

Mr.  Booth's  motion,  seconded  by  Mr.  De  Lancey, 
for  the  Previous  Question  on  Mr.  M'Dougall's 
motion,  referring  the  nomination  of  Delegates 
to  the  Committee  of  Mechanicks  for  their  con- 
currence, ...... 

Yeas  and  Nays  on  the  question,       ... 

Mr.  Bache  moved,  seconded  by  Mr.  De  Lancey, 
that  the  Committee  now  proceed  to  nominate 
five  persons  as  Delegates  to  meet  in  General 
Congress,  ......     308 

Captain  Sears  moved,  seconded  by  Mr.  P.  V.  B. 
Livingston,  that  Isaac  Low,  James  Duane, 
Philip  Livingston,  John  Morin  Scott,  and 
Alexander  M'Dougall,  be  nominated,     -         -     308 

Yeas  and  Nays  on  the  Previous  Question,  on 
Captain  Sears's  motion.       ....     308 


306 
306 

307 

307 

307 
307 


307 
307 


308 


308 
308 


xxxin 

1774. 

Jidyi,  Mr.  De  Lancey  moved,  seconded  by  Mr.  Booth, 
that  the  Committee  immediately  proceed  to 
nominate  five  persons  to  be  held  up  to  the  City 
and  County,  proper  to  serve  them  as  Delegates 
in  a  General  Congress,        ....     308 

Philip  Livingston,  John  Alsop,  Isaac  Low,  James 
Duane,  and  John  Jay,  nominated,  -         -     308 

A  Publick  Meeting  ordered  to  be  called  at  the 
City  Hall,  on  the  7th,  to  concur  in  the  nomina- 
tion, or  to  choose  others  in  their  stead,  -     309 

5,  Address  to  the  Publick.     ©bjections  to  a  Con- 

gress— Advises  an  humble  Address  from  each 
General  Assembly  to  the  King,  for  permission 
to  send  some  of  their  own  bodies  to  England 
to  fi.x  upon  a  Constitution,  (Note,)         -         -     309 

Answer  to  the  foregoing  Address,  (Note,)  -     309 

7,     Letter  from  Jacob  Lansing,  dated  Albany,  June 

29,  received, 309 

Committee  appointed  to  meet  a  Committee  of  the 
Mechanicks  to-morrow,  to  take  the  vote  of  the 
City  on  the  five  Delegates  nominated  by  this 
Committee,  and  the  five  nominated  by  the  Com- 
mittee of  Mechanicks,  ....     309 

Mr.  Thurman's  motion,  to  disavow  the  Proceed- 
ings of  the  Meeting  held  in  the  Fields,  yester- 
day, of  which  Mr.  M'Dougall  was  Chairman, 
as  evidently  calculated  to  throw  an  odium  on 
the  Committee,  and  to  create  jealousies  and 
suspicions  of  their  conduct,  -         -         -     310 

Mr.  M'Dougall  moves  for  the  Previous  Ques- 
tion on  Mr.  Thurman's  motion,    -         -         -     3 II 

Yeas  and  Nays  on  Mr.  M'Dougall's  motion,     -     311 

Yeas  and  Nays  on  Mr.  Thurman's  motion,        -     311 

Mr.  Lewis's  motion,  for  a  Committee  to  prepare 
Resolutions  to  be  submitted  to  the  People,      -     312 

Committee  appointed,     -         -         -         -         -     312 

Mr.  M'Evers's  motion,  for  the  publication  of  the 
Proceedings  on  the  motion  of  Mr.  Thurman,       312 

Yeas  and  Nays  on  this  question,       -         -         -     312 

6,  Resolutions  adopted  by  the  Meeting  in  the  Fields, 

referred  to  by  Mr.  Thurman.  1.  That  Boston 
is  suffering  in  the  common  cause  of  the  Colo- 
nies. 2.  An  invasion  of  the  rights  of  one  Col- 
ony is  an  attack  upon  the  liberties  of  all.  3. 
The  shutting  up  an  American  Port,  to  exact  a 
submission  to  Parliamentary  Taxation,  is  un- 
constitutional. 4.  Suspension  of  Trade  with 
Great  Britain  till  the  Boston  Act  is  repealed, 
will  save  America.  5.  Delegates  from  New- 
York  to  the  General  Congress  instructed  to 
unite  in  a  Non- Importation  Agreement.  6. 
The  Meeting  will  support  every  measure  of 
the  Congress  for  securing  the  objects  mention- 
ed in  these  Resolutions.  7.  Provincial  Con- 
vention recommended  to  choose  Deputies  to  the 
Congress.  8.  That  Subscriptions  be  immedi- 
ately set  on  foot  for  the  relief  of  the  Poor  of 
Boston.  9.  The  City  Committee  instructed  to 
carry  these  Resolutions  into  execution,         -      312 

8,  Address  of  Francis  Lewis  and  other  Members  of 

the  Committee  to  the  Inhabitants — their  reasons 
for  opposing  Mr.  Thurman's  and  Mr.  M'Evers's 
motion.    Withdraw  from  the  Committee,        -     313 

9,  Answer  of  "  One  of  the  Committee"  to  the  fore- 

going Address — Defence  of  the  Committee,   -     314 

Mr.  M'Dougall  declines  a  nomination  to  the  Con- 
gress, (Note,) 315 

Publications  relative  to  these  Proceedings,(  Note,)     3 1 5 
13,     Committee,  appointed  on  the  7th  instant,  report 

Resolutions,       -         -         -         -         -         -315 

Ordered  to  be  printed  and  distributed  in  handbills 
for  the  consideration  of  the  Publick,  who  are 
requested  to  meet  at  the  Coffee-House  on  the 
19th,  to  express  their  opinion  on  them,  -     315 

The  five  Gentlemen  nominated  by  the  Committee 

as  Delegates  to  the  General  Congress,  to  be 

proposed  to  the  Citizens  for  their  approbation, 

at  the  same  time  and  place,  -         -         -     315 

19,      Letter  from  Charlestown,  South  Carolina,  dated 

July  8,  with  Resolves,  received,    -         -         -     315 

At  the  Meeting  this  day  at  the  Coffee-House,  a 
small  portion  of  the  Citizens  only  attending, 
the  sentiments  of  the  majority  not  ascertained 
on  the  Resolutions,      -         -         -         -         -     315 

Committee  appointed  to  take  the  sense  of  the  Free- 
holders, Freemen,  and  Tax  Payers  in  each 
Ward,  on  the  Resolutions  and  the  nomination 
of  the  Delegates, 315 

FOUBTB  SeBIES. 


CONTENTS- 


XXXIV 


1774. 


July 
20. 


20. 


25, 


30. 
26. 


27. 


27. 


28. 


26, 


Resolutions  adopted  by  the  Committee:  1.  The 
King  of  Great  Britain  is  our  rightful  Sove- 
reign ;  it  is  our  duty  to  support  his  Crown  and 
dignity.  2.  All  Acts  of  Parliament  for  taxing 
the  Colonies,  unjust  and  unconstitutional,  par- 
ticularly the  Boston  Port  Act.  3.  Enforcing 
the  Taxation  in  the  Colonies,  the  true  motive 
and  main  design  of  that  Act.  4.  It  is  the 
duty  of  all  the  Colonies  to  assist  any  one  ao 
oppressed.  5.  The  meeting  of  the  proposed 
Congress  the  most  prudent  measure  in  this 
alarming  crisis.  6.  It  is  premature  for  one 
Colony  now  to  resolve  what  ought  to  be  done 
by  the  Congress,  who  should  be  left  free  to  de- 
cide on  what  they  think  best  7.  Nothing  but 
dire  necessity  can  justify  the  Colonies  in  uni- 
ting on  any  measure  that  may  injure  our 
brethren  in  Great  Britain.  8.  If  a  Non- Im- 
portation Agreement  should  be  adopted,  it 
ought  to  be  general,  and  faithfully  observed. 
9.  The  Delegates  to  Congress  should  be  so 
chosen  as  to  pledge  themselves  for  the  good 
conduct  of  the  People  they  represent,     -         -     315 

Mr.  Jay's  motion,  to  provide  for  the  distresses  of 
the  Poor  of  Boston. 316 

Committee  to  consider  of  the  means  for  their  re- 
lief and  to  report  with  all  convenient  speed,  -     317 

Committee  to  prepare  Answers  to  the  Letters  re- 
ceived,     -        -        -        -        -        -        -317 

Committee  appointed  to  request  the  Committee  of 
Mechanicks  to  appoint  persons  to  join  those 
appointed  by  this  Committee,  to  take  the  sense 
of  the  Inhabitants  on  the  Resolutions  and  the 
Delegates,  -         -         -         -         -         -317 

Address  of  Mr.  Alsop,  Mr.  Low,  and  Mr.  Jay, 
to  the  Publick.  The  sense  of  the  City  so  un- 
certain, that  they  do  not  consider  themselves, 
or  any  others,  duly  chosen  as  Delegates  to  the 
Congress,  - 317 

Address  of  Mr.  Moore,  Mr.  Low,  Mr.  Remsen, 
and  Mr.  Jay,  to  the  Publick.  After  the  rejec- 
tion of  the  Resolutions  offered  by  the  Commit- 
tee of  Correspondence  to  the  Meeting  at  the 
Coffee-House,  on  the  19th,  they  were  appoint- 
ed on  another  Committee  to  prepare  new  Re- 
solutions. Their  appointment  irregular,  and 
decline  serving.  They  approve,  with  few  ex- 
ceptions, of  the  rejected  Resolutions,     -         -     317 

Letter,  dated  Boston,  July,  1774,  received,  -     318 

Mr.  Remsen's  motion,  that  a  Poll  be  opened  in 
each  Ward,  on  the  28th,  for  the  election  of  five 
Deputies  to  the  Congress,    -        -        -        -     3 1 8 

Unanimously  agreed  to,  -        -        -        -     318 

Committee  to  carry  it  into  effect,      -        -        -     318 

Amendment  of  the  third  Resolve,     -        -        -     318 

Queries  from  Ulster  County,  (Note,)         -         -     318 

Note  from  the  Committee,  at  Mr.  Marriner's.  to 
the  Delegates  nominated,  desiring  a  pledge 
that  they  will  support  a  Non-Importation 
Agreement  in  the  Congress,  until  the  Ameri- 
can Grievances  are  redressed,       ...      319 

Reply  of  Mr.  Livingston,  Mr.  Low,  Mr.  Alsop, 
and  Mr.  Jay.  They  believe  a  general  Non- 
Importation  Agreement  would  prove  the  most 
efficacious  means  to  procure  a  redress  of  Grie- 
vances,    -        -        -        -        -        -        -319 

In  answer  to  this  Reply,  the  Committee,  at  Mr. 
Marriner's,  agree  to  support  the  nominated 
Delegates, 319 

Letter  from  Charles  Thomson,  Philadelphia, 
dated  July  25,  with  Resolves,  received,         -      320 

Publication  of  Proceedings  of  yesterday,  ordered, 
to  correct  a  mistake  in  Mr.  Holt's  Paper,     -      320 

The  Publication  of  Mr.  Holt,  referred  to  by  the 
Committee,  (Note,) 320 

Philip  Livingston,  Isiac  Low,  John  Jay,  John 
Alsop,  and  James  Duane,  mianimously  elected 
Delegates  to  the  Congress, 

Committee  on  the  distresses  of  the  Poor  in  Bos- 
ton will  report  at  next  meeting  of  the  Com- 
mittee,      .-.---- 

Letter  to  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  at 
Charlestown,  South  Carolina.  Resolutions  of 
South  Carolina  much  approved  of  Nothing 
but  a  strict  union  among  all  the  Colonies 
can  effect  a  restoration  of  the  just  rights  of 
America.  Will  concur  in  every  constitutional 
measure  for  obtaining  a  redress  of  Grievances. 


-     320 


320 


XX  XT 


CONTENTS. 


XXXVI 


1774, 

July 

28. 


23, 


29, 


Augt 
7, 


22. 


29, 


Sept. 
5, 


19, 


29, 
30. 

Oct. 

7 


Three  sets  of  Resolutions  published  in  New- 
York,  that  si|?n«l  by  ilie  Chairman,  adopt»>d. 
Letter  to  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  at 
Philadelphia.  After  various  contests  on  the 
appointment  of  Delegates,  regular  polls  have 
been  opened  in  each  Ward  in  the  Guy,  which 
has  given  imiversal  satisfaction.  Letters  sent 
to  the  several  Comities  of  the  Province  re- 
questing their  co-operation.  Resolves  and 
Instructions  of  the  Provincial  Committee  of 
Pennsylvania,  much  approved,  - 
Letter  to  Matthew  Tilghman,  Chairman  of  Com- 
mittee for  Maryland.  Resolutions  of  Mary- 
land much  approved.  The  1st  of  September 
proposed  by  Massachusetts  for  the  meeting  of 
Congress,  agreed  to  by  Eastern  Colonies, 
except  New- Hampshire,  from  whence  no  com- 
mmiication  has  been  received  on  the  present 
state  of  affairs,  .         .         -         -         - 

Letter  sent  to  the  Committee  or  Treasurer  of  the 
different  Counties  in  the  Province.  Suggests 
the  e.xpediency  of  electing  Delegates  to  Con- 
gress m  the  several  Counties  speedily ;  or  to 
express  their  confidence  in  the  Delegates  elect- 
ed in  the  City,  .  .  .  -  - 
Letter  from  Elizabethtovvn.  dated  August  5th. 

received,  .        .         .         -         - 

Conmiittee  appointed  to  answer  a  Letter  from 
Boston,  ancf  to  wait  on  the  Chairman  of  the 
Mechanicks'  Committee,  to  request  the  Boston 
Letter  to  them,  .         .         -         .         - 

Committee  appointed  to  procure  Collections  to 
relieve  the  poor  of  Boston ;  and  to  request  the 
assistance  of  the  Coumuttee  of  Mechanicks  in 
making  the  subscriptions,  ... 

Election  of  Delegates  in  Orange  and  Albany 
Counties,  (Note,)  .  -  -  -  - 
Letter  to  the  Committee  of  Correspondence,  of 
Boston.  Explain  the  cause  of  their  omission 
to  write,  and  express  their  regret  that  the  rec- 
titude of  their  intentions  are  doubted.  Appeal 
to  their  Acts,  Letters,  and  Resolves,  to  show 
their  attachment  to  the  general  cause.  Defend 
the  Merchants  against  the  charge  of  want  of 
patriotism,  made  against  them,  in  the  Letter  to 
the  Committee  of  the  Mechanicks.  Request 
to  be  furnished  with  copies  of  the  Letters  that 
have  given  rise  to  the  suspicions.  The  dis- 
tresses of  the  Poor  of  Boston  have  engaged 
the  earnest  attention  of  tlie  Committee, 
Letter  to  the  several  Counties  of  the  Province. 
Urges  them  to  contribute  for  the  relief  of  the 
Poor  of  Boston.  The  interest  and  welfare  of  a 
whole  Contment  requires  that  provision  should 
be  made  for  all  sufferers  in  the  common  cause. 
Letter  from  Suffolk  County,  dated  August  11, 
received.  Colonel  William  Floyd  elected  a 
Delegate  for  that  County,  - 
Busine.ss  of  the  ensuing  Congress  discussed,  in 

presence  of  the  Delegates,  (Note,) 
Letter  to   Zephaniah  Piatt,   Dutchess  Coimty. 

Delegates  chosen  in  the  City  approved. 
Letters  received  from   Kingston,  August,    19  ; 
New- Windsor,  August  26;  Bedford,  August  9; 
Mamaroneck,  August  7  ;  and  White  Plains, 
August  27  ;  approving  the  Delegates  chosen 

for  the  City, 

3.  Reported  attack  on  Boston,  on  the  2d,  (Note,) 

Letters  from  Albany,  August  27,  and  Pough- 

keepsie,  August  31,  approving  the  Resolves 

and  Delegates  for  New- York,     -         •         . 

Letter  from  Isaac  Low,  Philadelphia,  received. 

Committee  appointed  to  write  to  Richmond,  Kings, 

Q.uefns,  and  Tryon  Counties,  requesting  them 

to  send  Delegates  to  the  Congress  now  sitting, 

or  to  approve  of  those  now  tliere,  for  the 

Province  of  New- York,     -        -         .         . 

Representation  from  a  number  of   Inhabitants, 

signed  by  Joseph  Totten,  their  President, 
Conmiittee  call  a  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  at 
tlie  City- Hall,  this  day,  to  consider  Mr.  Tot- 
ten's  Representation,  -        -         -         . 
Conduct  of  the  persons  complained  of  in  the  Re- 
presentation, condemned,     - 
5,  Meeting  of  Importers  called  to  consider  advances 
upon  Goods  imported, 
ImportiTs  agree  not  to  put  unreasonable  advances 
on  Goods,  from  the  apprehension  of  a  Non 


320 


1774. 


-     321 


321 


-     322 


-     322 


Importation :  will  discourage  all  Engrossers; 
and  will  dtcline  dealing  with  all  who  attempt 
to  defeat  their  Resolutions,  .         .         - 

iVw.  7, Committee  appointed  to  inquire  what  progress 
has  been  made  in  Collections  for  the  Poor  of 
Boston,     -         -         -         -         -         - 

Meeting  of  the  Citizens  called  to  appoint  Com- 
mittees of  Inspection,  agreeably  to  the  Conti- 
nental Association,     .         -         -         -         - 

Committee  appointetl  to  write  to  the  several 
Counties,  recommending  the  appointment  of 
Committees  of  Inspection,  .         .         - 

14,  Letter  to  Daniel   Dmiscomb,  Chairman  of  the 

Committee  of  Mechanicks.  Requests  a  Con- 
ference with  that  Committee  on  the  appoint- 
ment of  Committees  of  Inspection, 
Contributors  for  the  Poor  of  Boston,  in  the  seve- 
ral Counties,  requested  to  transmit  their  Do- 
nations as  speedily  as  possible  to  New- York, 

15,  Committee,  after  their  Conference  with  the  Com- 

mittee of  Mechanicks,  consider  their  body  dis- 
solved on  the  election  of  a  Committee  under 
the  Association  of  Congress,        .         .         - 

Election  of  new  Committee  of  Sixty  ordered,  on 
the  22d  instant,  .         .         -         .         - 

The  new  Committee  of  Sixty  elected. 


322 


322 


322 


323 


323 


-     324 


-     324 


324 


325 
325 


326 
326 


326 


-     326 


326 


-     327 


-     328 


22, 


May 
10, 
13, 
13, 


14, 
16, 

17, 

18. 

17, 

18, 


19, 


17, 


18, 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

The  Port  Bill  received  at  Boston,  (Note,) 

General  Gage  arrived  at  Boston,  (Note,) 

To\vn  Meeting  in  Boston — Advise  the  stoppage 
of  all  Imports  from,  and  all  Exports  to,  Great 
Britain  and  the  West  Indies,  till  the  Port  Bill 
is  repealed,         ...-.- 

This  vote  ordered  to  be  sent  to    11  the  Colonics, 

Committee  appointed  to  consider  what  measures 
are  proper  for  the  Town  to  adopt,  in  the  pre- 
sent emergency,  .         .         .         -         . 

Committee  appointed  to  consult  with  Salem  and 
Marblehead,       ...... 

Paul  Revere  despatched  with  Letters  to  the 
Southern  Colonies,  (Note,)  ... 

Election  of  Committee  of  Fifty  at  New- York,  to 
correspond  with  the  Colonies,  on  all  matters  of 
moment,  ...... 

General  Gtage  landed  in  Boston.  Sworn  into 
office  as  Governour,  and  invited  to  a  publick 
entertainment  at  Faneuil  Hall,  (Note,) 

Meeting  at  Faneuil  Hall,  Boston,  recommend 
to  the  People  patience,  fortitude,  and  a  firm 
trust  in  God,      - 

Votes  passed  at  this  Meeting,  ... 

Letter  received  in  Boston  from  Philadelphia. 
Boston  need  not  expect  general  support  from 
the  other  Colonics.  In  Pennsylvania  they 
will  find  none,  ..... 

Letter  from  Samuel  Adams,  Boston,  to  Arthur 
Lee,  London.  Injustice  and  barbarity  of  the 
Port  Bill.  The  Inhabitants  view  it  with  in- 
dignation. Have  resolved  upon  a  Non-Im- 
portation. Calmness,  courage,  and  unanimity 
prevail.  Suspect  studied  insult  in  the  appoint- 
ment of  General  Gage, 

Letter  from  General  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. Occurrences  at  Boston,  on  his  arrival. 
The  Committee  from  Boston  to  Salem  and 
Marblehead  received  little  encouragement. — 
The  Port  Bill  has  staggered  the  most  presump- 
tuous. The  Assembly  may  be  more  inclined 
to  comply  with  the  King's  expectation  at  Sa- 
lem, where  they  will  be  moved  after  the  first  of 
June,         --..... 

TowTi  Meeting  at  Providence,  Rhode- Island. — 
Will  unite  with  the  other  Colonies  in  measures 
for  protecting  and  securing  their  rights.  Re- 
commend a  Congress  of  all  the  Colonies  and 
Provinces,  for  establishing  the  firmest  union 
between  tliem.  All  the  English  American 
Colonies  equally  interested  in  the  Proceedings 
of  Parliament  against  Boston.  Recommend 
the  stoppage  of  all  Trade  with  Great  Britain, 
Ireland,  Africa,  and  the  West  Indies,      - 

Meeting  at  Chestertown,  Maryland,  on  the  i»r- 
portation  of  Dutiable  Tea  in  the  Geddes.  No 
Taxes  or  Duties  can  be  constinitionally  im- 
posed without  our  consent.      The    Duty  on 


328 
328 
329 
329 

329 
329 

330 

330 
330 


331 
331 


331 
331 


331 
331 


331 


293 


331 


331 
332 


332 


332 


333 


333 


xxxni 


CONTENTS. 


XXXVIII 


1774. 

May 

18, 


19, 
19, 


19, 


20, 


20, 
21, 


20, 

20, 


20, 


20, 


21, 


337 


337 


Tea  unconstitutional.  Whoever  imports,  buys, 

or  sells  it,  stigmatized  as  enemies  to  America,      334 

Address  to  the  Freemen  of  America.  Conduct 
of  Great  Britain  towards  America,  a  system  of 
oppression.  Life,  liberty,  and  property,  are 
now  but  names  in  America.  New- York, 
Philadelphia,  and  Charlestown,  cannot  escape 
the  fate  of  Boston.  An  union  of  the  Colonies 
will  render  harmless  British  vengeance  and 
tyranny.  Virtue,  unanimity,  and  persever- 
ence,  are  invincible,  -         -         -         -     335 

Pablick  Meeting  at  Farmington,  Coimecticut. — 
Liberty  Pole  erected,  and  Boston  Port  Bill 
burnt  by  the  common  hangman,  -         -     336 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence,  at 
Westerly,  to  the  Committee  of  Boston.  Treat- 
ment of  Boston  by  Great  Britain  worse  than 
that  of  Carthage  by  Rome.  The  attack  upon 
Boston,  an  attempt  upon  the  whole  Continent. 
The  other  Colonies  will  unite  with  the  friends 
of  liberty,  in  Boston,  in  support  of  the  common 
cause,       .-.--.-     336 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Portsmouth,  New- 
Hampshire,  to  the  Boston  Committee.  The 
British  Ministry  are  endeavouring  to  disunite 
the  Colonies,  that  they  may  put  down  their  op- 
position. A  firm  union  of  all  the  Colonies 
will  prevent  the  cruel  effects  of  the  Port  Bill, 

Letter  to  Lord  North,  attributed  to  Edmund 
Burke.  The  rights  of  the  Crown,  and  the 
rights  of  the  Colonies,  under  various  Charters 
and  Grants,       ..-.-. 

Letter  from  a  Member  of  the  Virginia  Assembly, 
Williamsburg,  to  his  Correspondent  in  Lon- 
don. Resentment  in  Virginia,  on  account  of 
die  War  sent  to  Boston.  It  is  the  universal 
determination  to  stop  the  principal  Exports  to, 
and  all  the  Imports  from.  Great  Britain.  The 
Assembly,  now  in  session,  will  agree  on  mea- 
sures to  be  adopted,  before  they  adjourn,         -     340 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Philadelphia. — 
Committee  of  Correspondence  appoint^!,        -     340 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Philadelphia  to  the 
Boston  Committee.  It  is  difficult  to  collect  the 
sense  of  the  People,  or  to  advise  what  ought  to 
be  done,  on  this  crisis.  The  general  sense  of 
this  Province,  and  of  all  the  Colonies,  should 
be  obtained.  If  satisfying  the  East  India  Com- 
pany for  the  Tea  would  end  the  controversy, 
there  would  be  no  hesitation  on  what  ought  to 
be  done.  A  Congress  from  all  the  Colonies, 
preferred  by  the  People  of  Pennsylvania,  to  a 
Non-Importation  and  Non-Exportation  Agree- 
ment. Will  endeavour  to  collect  the  sense  of 
Pennsylvania,  and  the  neighbouring  Colonies, 
on  these  important  points,    -        -        -        -     341 

Cluestions  and  Answers,  on  paying  for  the  Tea, 
(Note,) 295 

Letter  from  Gouverneur  Morris,  New- York, 
to  Mr.  Penn,  Philadelphia.  Proceedings  in 
New- York,  on  the  appointment  of  the  Com- 
mittee. His  opinions  on  the  state  of  parties  in 
New- York.  A  safe  compact  for  re-union 
with  the  parent  state,  is  to  leave  internal  Tax- 
ation to  the  Colonics,  and  to  vest  the  regula- 
tion of  Trade  in  Great  Britain.  His  reasons 
for  this  as  the  only  possible  mode  of  re-union,      343 

To^^^l  Meeting  at  Newport,  Rhode- Island. — 
The  Boston  Port  Bill  subversive  of  American 
Liberty.  The  same  authority  may  destroy 
the  Trade  of  every  other  Colony.  Will  unite 
with  the  other  Colonies,  in  all  proper  mea- 
sures, to  place  the  rights  of  each  on  a  perma- 
nent foundation,  and  particularly  in  a  stoppage 
of  all  Trade  with  Great  Britain  and  the  West 
Indies, 343 

Company  at  Ne\vport  for  carrying  on  Woollen 
Manufactures  in  the  Colony.  Wool  enough 
raised  to  clothe  all  the  Inhabitants,  (Note,)     -     344 

Letter  from  General  Gage  to  Governour  Trum- 
bull. Informs  him  of  his  appointment  as 
Governour  of  Massachusetts,  and  expresses 
his  readiness  to  co-operate  for  the  good  of  his 
Majesty's  service,       .         -         -         .         .     344 

Letter  from  the  Boston  Committee,  in  reply  to 
one  from  sundry  Gentlemen  in  New- York. 
Thanks  for  their  unsolicited  offer  of  assistance. 
Letters  countermanding  orders  for  Goods  sent 


1774. 


May 
23, 


23. 


23, 


24, 


24, 


24, 


24, 

24, 


May 
24, 


26, 
27, 


29, 


30, 


by  a  vessel  yesterday  for  London.  The  friends 
of  Government,  in  Boston,  procuring  signers 
to  an  Address  to  Governour  Hutchinson,  and 
are  endeavouring  to  raise  money  to  pay  for 
the  Tea, 344 

Intelligence  received  at  Philadelphia  from  Pitts- 
burgh. On  the  26th  of  April,  two  Indians 
killed  on  the  Ohio,  near  Wheeling.  Michael 
Cresap  believed  to  be  concerned  in  the  murder. 
Cresap  had  previously  declared  he  would  kill 
every  Indian  he  met  on  the  River ;  and  if  he 
could  get  a  sufficient  number  of  men,  he  would 
mark  a  Village  on  Yellow  Creek.  Another 
party  of  Indians  attacked  by  Cresap.  Great- 
house  and  Baker  cut  off  a  party  at  Yellow 
Creek, 34.5 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  the 
Boston  Committee.  Advise  a  General  Con- 
gress of  all  the  Colonies,  to  be  assembled 
without  delay;  and  some  unanimous  resolution 
formed,  not  only  respecting  the  deplorable  cir- 
cumstances of  Boston,  but  for  the  security  of 
our  common  rights,  ....     297 

Address  of  the  Episcopal  Ministers  and  Wardens, 
in  Boston,  to  Governour  Hutchinson,  -     346 

Governour  Hutchinson's  Answer,  -         -     346 

Address  of  the  Justices  of  the  Court  of  General 
Sessions  of  the  Peace,  for  the  County  of  Suf- 
folk, Massachusetts,  to  Governour  Gage,       -     346 

The  Governour's  Answer,     -         -         -         .     347 

Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  the  Boston  Commit- 
tee. The  cause  of  Boston  the  cause  of  all  the 
Colonies.  Must  be  supported  against  the 
whole  strength  of  Great  Britain.  By  sea 
they  will  beat  us ;  by  land  they  will  not  at- 
tempt us.  We  must  suspend  all  Trade  with 
Great  Britain  and  the  West  Indies,  and  with- 
hold Flax-seed  from  Ireland.  Stopping  our 
Ports  entirely,  contemplated.  We  shall  try  to 
convene  a  Congress  as  soon  as  possible,  -     347 

Meeting  at  Talbot  Court  House,  Maryland,  to 
consider  the  distresses  of  Boston.  Determined 
to  pursue  every  constitutional  measure  to  avert 
the  evils  threatened  by  the  Boston  Port  Bill ; 
to  support  the  common  rights  of  America,  and 
to  promote  union  and  harmony  between  Great 
Britain  and  the  Colonies,     ...         -     347 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  the 
Philadelphia  Committee,     -         .         -         .     298 

Letter  I,  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  British  Colo- 
nies in  America,  on  the  present  disputes  with 
Great  Britain, 348 


HOUSE  OF  BURGESSES  OF  VIRGINIA. 

Resolution  of  the  House  of  Burgesses  of  Virgi- 
nia, setting  apart  the  first  day  of  June  to  be  ob- 
served, by  the  Members  of  the  House,  as  a  day 
of  Fasting,  Humiliation,  and  Prayer,  -     350 

Assembly  of  Virginia  dissolved  by  Lord  Dun- 
more,        -         -     350 

Association  agreed  to  and  signed  by  eighty-nine 
Members  of  the  late  House  of  Burgesses  of 
Virginia,  ......     350 

Members  of  the  late  House  of  Burgesses  remain- 
ing in  Tovm  convened  by  Peyton  Randolph  ; 
who,  on  considering  the  important  Letters  re- 
ceived this  day,  by  express,  from  Boston,  Phil- 
adelphia, and  Annapolis,  ordered  the  other 
Members  near  the  City  to  be  called  together,       35 1 

Twenty-five  Members  met,  and  unanimously 
agreed  to  postpone  the  further  consideration  of 
the  subject  to  the  first  of  August ;  when  it  is 
expected  a  Non- Importation  Agreement  will 
be  entered  into,  and  Resolutions  to  suspend,  at 
some  future  day,  Exports  to  Great  Britain,  -  35 1 
Juru  1,  Divine  Service,  at  Williamsburg,  in  compliance 
with  the  Resolution  of  the  Burgesses,  of  the 
24th  of  May,  (Note,)  -         -         -         -     351 


May 
29, 


CORRESPONDENCE,    PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Letter  from  Lord  Dunmore,  Williamsburg,  to 
the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Resolution  of  the 
House  of  Burgesses  to  deny  and  oppose  the 
authority  of  Parliament  offered  by  Robert 
Carter  Nicholas,  Treasurer  of  the  Province. 
Dissolved  the  Assembly,  with  the  unanimous 


XXX IX 


1774. 


CONTENTS. 


XX. 


consent  of  the  Council.  Will  not  call  another 
till  he  hears  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Ma- 
ny of  the  dissolved  Members  state  that  if  the 
full  force  of  the  Resolution  had  been  adverted 
to,  it  would  have  met  with  strong  opposition,  352 
May    Meetiiip;  at  Annapolis,  Maryland.     The  suffer- 

26,  inp  of  Boston,  the  common  cause  of  America. 
A  stoppage  of  Trade  with  Great  Britain  will 
preserve  North  America  and  her  Liberties. 
Gentlemen  of  the  Law  in  the  Province  should 
bring  no  suit  for  the  recovery  of  a  debt  due  to 
Hn  Inhabitant  of  Great  Britain,  until  the  Boston 
Port  Act  be  repealed.  The  Inhabitants  of 
Annajiolis  will,  and  the  Province  ought,  im- 
mediately to  break  offall  Trade  with  the  Colo- 
ny or  Province  which  shall  refuse  to  adopt 
similar  Resolutions  with  a  majority  of  the 
Colonies.  Committee  appointed  to  unite  with 
others  of  the  Province,  to  effect  an  Association 

to  secure  American  Liberty,         .         .         -     352 
2G,     Objections  to  the  Proceedings  at  the  Meeting  at 

Annapolis,  on  the  24th,         ...         -     353 

27,  Another  Meeting,  held  at  Annapolis,  confirmed 

the  Resolutions  passed  on  the  24th,         -         -     353 
30,     Protest  of  a  number  of  Inhabitants  of  Annapolis 
against  the  Resolution  adopted  on  the  27th, 
asrainst  bringing  suits  for  debts  due  to  Persons 
residing  in  Great  Britain,     ...         -     353 

Letter  from  Daniel  Dulany,  Jim.,  Annapolis,  to 
Arthur  Lee.  Notice  of  the  Proceedings  on 
the  24th.  He  opposed  one  of  the  Resolutions. 
The  Resolutions  are  not  to  be  obligatory  until 
they  are  agreed  to  by  a  majority  of  the  Colo- 
nies, and  the  several  Counties  of  this  Province,     354 

Resolutions  adopted  by  the  House  of  Representa- 
tives of  the  English  Colony  of  Connecticut,  355 

1 .  The  King  of  Great  Britain  recognised  as  their 
lawful  Sovereign,        -         .         .         -        .     355 

2.  The  Lihabitants  of  the  Colony  have  all  the 
rights  and  privileges  of  Subjects  bom  within 

the  Realm  of  England,         ....     355 

3.  The  Assembly  of  the  Colony  the  only  lawful 
Representatives  thereof,        ....     356 

4.  It  is  the  right  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Col- 
ony to  be  governed  only  by  their  own  Assem- 
bly, in  Taxing  and  Internal  Police,       -        -    356 

5.  Admiralty  Courts,  with  extraordinary  powers, 
destructive  of  the  rights  of  the  People  of  the 
Colony, 356 

6.  Carrj-ing  Persons  beyond  the  Sea,  for  Trial, 
unconstitutional,  and  subversive  of  the  rights 

of  the  Colony,     -.--..     356 

7.  A  Port  can  only  be  shut  up  by  the  Legisla- 
ture of  the  Colony  in  which  it  is  situated,      -    356 

8.  Closing  the  Port  of  Boston,  by  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment, inconsistent  with  the  rights  and  liberties 

of  the  Colonies  in  America,  ...     355 

9.  Whenever  his  Majesty's  service  shall  require 

the  aid  of  this  Colony,  it  wll  be  granted,       -    356 

10.  The  well-being  and  security  of  the  Colony 
depends  on  its  connection  with  Great  Britain,       356 

11.  It  is  our  duty,  by  all  lawful  means,  to  defend 

and  preserve  our  rights  and  liberties,      -         -     357 

25,  Meeting  of  Assembly  of  Massachusetts,  -     357 
Counsellors  elected,        .....     357 

26,  Counsellors  rejected  by  the  Govemour,      -         -     357 
Govemour's  Speech  to  both  Houses.      Informs 

them  that  after  the  first  of  June,  in  compliance 
with  the  King's  particular  commands,  the  Gen- 
eral Court  will  be  held  at  Salem,  -         -     357 
25,     Address  presented  to  Govemour  Hutchinson,  by 

sundry  Gentlemen  of  Marblehead,  -         -     358 

Govemour  Hutchinson's  Answer,     -         -         -     358 
JuHC  3,  Declaration  of  Marblehead,  relative  to  the  Ad- 
dress from  sundry  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  to 
Govemour  Hutchinson;  unanimously  voted  at 
a  legal  Town  Meeting,        ....    359 


NEW-HAMPSHIRE    ASSEMBLY. 

May  Assembly  of  New-Hampshire  authorize  the  en- 
27,  listment  of  three  Men,  to  be  posted  at  his  Ma- 
jesty's Fort,  William  and  Mary,  under  the  com- 
mand of  one  Officer,  ....  ^qq 
Message  from  Govemour  Wentworth  to  the  As- 
sembly. He  does  not  think  it  safe  to  entrust  so 
important  a  Fortress  to  the  care  and  defence  of 
three  Men  and  one  Officer,  ,        .        .    350 


1774. 

May  Committee  appointed  by  the  Assembly  of  New- 
28,        Hampshire,  to  correspond  with  the  Committees 

in  the  other  Colonies,  -         -         -         -     361 

The  Speaker  directed  to  answer  such  Letters  as 
he  may  receive  from  the  other  Colonies  rela- 
tive to  the  Difficulties  between  Great  Britain 
and  the  Colonies,  and  to  assure  them  that  this 
Assembly  will  join  them  in  all  measures  for 
saving  the  rights  of  America,  -  -  -  361 
The  Govemour  authorized  to  enlist  five  Men  for 
Fort  William  and  Mary,      -         -         -         -     361 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

May   Address  of  Merchants  and  Traders  of  the  Town 

28,  of  Boston,  presented  to  Govemour  Hutchinson,     361 
Answer  of  Govemour  Hutchinson,  -         -     362 

24,  Protest  of  the  Merchants  and  Traders  of  the 
TowTi  of  Boston,  unanimously  votfd,  at  a  full 
Meeting,  against  a  Paper  called  an  Address 
to  Govemour  Hutchinson,  handed  about,  and 
signed,  in  a  private  manner,  -         -         -     362 

29,  Address  presented  to  Govemour  Hutchinson,  by 

several  Gentlemen  of  the  Law,     .         .         -     363 
Answer  of  Govemour  Hutchinson,  -         -     363 

30,  Letter  from  Bedford,  Pennsylvania.    Alarms  on 

the  Frontiers  on  account  of  the  Indians.  A  par- 
ty of  the  Shawanese  out,  it  is  supposed  to  at- 
tack some  part  of  Virginia,  ...     364 

30,  "Join  or  Die!"  An  Appeal  to  the  People  to  unite 
in  resisting  the  Parliament,  and  supporting  Bos- 
ton,   364 

30,     Address  from  the  Magistrates  of  Middlesex  Coun- 
ty, Massachusetts,  to  Govemour  Hutchinson,       364 
Mr.  Hutchinson's  Answer,       ....     365 

30,  A  Meeting  of  a  number  of  Persons  of  all  societies, 
in  Philadelphia,  determine  to  suspend  all  busi- 
ness on  the  first  of  June,  the  day  the  Boston 
Port  Bill  takes  effect,  (Note,)         -         -         -     365 

30,  Committee  of  the  Society  of  Quakers  inform  the 
Publick  that  no  person  was  authorized  to  repre- 
sent them  at  the  Meeting  for  suspending  busi- 
ness on  the  first  of  Jime,  ....  365 
June  1,  People  of  Philadelphia,  except  the  Friends,  sus- 
pend all  business ;  nine-tenths  shut  up  their 
houses.  The  Bells  were  rang  muffled;  and 
Vessels  in  the  Port  had  their  Colours  half 

hoisted,  (Note,) 365 

6,  Rector  of  Christ's  Church,  Philadelphia,  ac- 
quaints the  Publick  that  the  Bells  of  that 
Church  were  not  rang,  on  the  1st,  with  his 
knowledge  or  approbation:  he  specially  di- 
rected there  should  be  no  observance  of  that 
day  in  any  of  the  Churches  under  his  care, 

(Note,) 365 

May  Queen  Anne  County,  Maryland,  Resolutions.  The 

30,  cause  of  Boston,  the  common  cause  of  America ; 
all  legal  means  should  be  adopted  to  procure 
the  repeal  of  the  Boston  Port  Bill.  All  com- 
mercial intercourse  with  Great  Britain  should 
be  stopped  until  that  Act  is  repealed,  and  the 
right  assumed  by  Parliament,  for  taxing  Ame- 
rica, in  all  cases  whatsoever,  be  given  up.  Com- 
mittee of  Correspondence  and  Intercourse  ap- 
pointed,      366 

30,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Lon- 

don, (Note,) 299 

31,  Bakimore  County,  Maryland,  Resolutions.    The 

duty  of  every  Colony  in  America  to'  imite  to 
obtain  a  repeal  of  the  Boston  Port  Bill.  This 
County  will  join  with  the  Province  to  stop 
Trade  with  Great  Britain  and  the  West  Indies. 
Provincial  Ccngress  recommended;  to  be  held 
at  Annapolis.  Maryland  should  break  offall 
intercourse  with  any  Colony  who  shall  refuse 
to  come  into  similar  Resolutions  with  a  ma- 
jority of  the  Colonies.  Committee  of  Corres- 
pondence appointed,     365 

31,  Letter  from  Govemour  Perm  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  An  Express  despatched  to  Phil- 
adelphia, from  Boston,  with  a  proposal  to  stop 
all  "Tradi'  with  Great  Britain.  In  consequence 
of  this  a  Meeting  was  held,  where  the  matter 
was  considered  and  debated.  It  was  resolved 
to  petition  the  Govemour  to  convene  the  Gen- 
eral Assembly  on  the  occasion.  Should  so  af- 
frontive  an  application  be  made,  will  treat  it  as 
it  deserves, 367 


xr.i 

1774. 

Miy  Letter  from  Governour  Franklin,  Burlington,  to 
31,  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Difficult  to  foresee 
what  will  be  the  consequences  of  the  Boston 
Port  Act.  The  Merchants  of  New- York  and 
Philadelphia,  though  inclined  to  co-operate 
with  Boston,  unwilling  to  enter  into  a  Gen- 
eral Non-Importation  and  Non-Exportation 
Agreement.  A  Congress  has  been  proposed, 
but  whether  it  will  take  place  is  uncertain,  -  368 
31,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Lon- 
don, (Note,)       299 

3 1 ,  Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. Doubtful  whether  the  other  Colonies 
will  give  Boston  any  thing  but  good  words. 
The  violent  seem  to  break,  and  the  People  to 
fall  off  from  them.  The  Assembly  hurrying 
through  their  business,  to  avoid  meeting  at 
Salem,  were  suddenly  adjourned  by  him  to  meet 
there  on  the  7th  of  June.  The  Officers  of 
the  Customs  leave  Boston  to-morrow,  and  the 
Admiral  has  stationed  his  Ships.  No  design 
has  yet  appeared  of  opposing  the  Act.  Many 
wish  for  the  arrival  of  the  Troops ;  People  will 
speak  openly  then,  which  they  now  dare  not 

do, 368 

31,  Letter  from  John  Scollay,  Boston,  to  Arthur  Lee. 
Injurious  effects  that  will  be  felt  by  the  whole 
Province  from  the  Boston  Port  Bill.  Although 
it  was  intended  to  ruin  the  Town,  yet  out  of 
this  management  of  Lord  North's,  instead  of 
despotism  and  tyranny  over  the  Colonies,  a 
foundation  for  peace  and  harmony  with  Great 
Britain  will  be  laid.  The  Colonies  do  not 
wish  for  Independence,  and  they  are  too  valu- 
able for  the  Crown  to  part  with,  -  -  369 
31,     Information   of  the   Boston  Port  Bill  received 

with  indignation  at  Charlestown,  S.  Carolina,  370 
31,  Letter  from  the  Norfolk,  Virginia,  Committee,  to 
the  Committee  at  Charlestown,  South  Carolina. 
The  time  has  come  when  the  closest  union  is 
necessary.  The  Boston  Port  Bill  is  an  attack 
upon  the  liberties  of  us  all.  We  look  to  Charles- 
town as  among  those  to  take  the  lead  in  the  gen- 
eral establishment  of  the  rights  of  the  Colonies. 
Fear  Boston  will  sink  under  the  weight  of 
their  misfortunes.  Approve  of  the  expediency 
of  a  Congress.  If,  after  all,  the  India  Com- 
pany must  be  reimbursed,  every  freeman  will 
cheerfully  join  in  the  general  expense,  -     370 

June  1,  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Colden,  New- 
York,  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  At  the 
time  the  Boston  Port  Bill  was  received  in 
New- York,  the  men  who  called  themselves  the 
Committee,  were,  many  of  them,  of  the  lower 
rank,  and  all  the  warmest  zealots  of  those  called 
the  Sons  of  Liberty.  The  principal  Inhabi- 
tants, at  a  meeting  held  after  the  Port  Act  was 
published,  dissolved  this  Committee  and  appoint- 
ed a  new  one,  of  the  prudent  people  of  the  city. 
No  Resolutions  have  yet  been  adopted  by  this 

Colony, 372 

1,  Letter  from  Major  General  Haldimand,  New- 
York,  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Since  the 
late  vigorous  measures  of  Parliament,  the  loyal 
Inhabitants  fear  not  to  disapprove  the  rash  pro- 
ceedings of  their  Countrymen.  This  has  pre- 
vented the  passage  of  Resolutions  to  stop  Trade 
with  Great  Britain  and  the  West  Indies,  -  373 
1,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Scot- 
land, (Note,)       - 302 

I,  Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  Resolutions.  Will 
concur  in  every  proper  measure  adopted  by 
the  Colonies  respecting  Boston.  Committee 
of  Correspondence  appointed,  -  .  .  373 
I,  Letter  II,  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  British  Colo- 
nies in  America.  An  examination  of  the  Acts 
relating  to  America,     -         -         -         -         -     374 

1,  An  Address  to  all  the  English  Colonies  of  North 

America.  Effects  and  consequences  of  the 
Boston  Port  Bill, 377 

2,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Kent  County,  Ma- 

ryland. Committee  of  Correspondence  ap- 
pointed. Delegates  to  the  Provincial  Con- 
gress at  Annapolis,  chosen.  Collections  made 
for  the  suffering  Poor  of  Boston,  -         -     379 

2,  Letter  from  a  Member  of  the  Assembly  of  New- 
Jersey.  Meeting  of  a  Committee  at  New- 
Brunswick.     Will  do  whatever  may  be  gen- 


CONTENTS. 


XLII 


1774. 


erally  agreed  on.  Have  requested  the  Govern- 
our to  convene  the  Assembly  before  the  first  of 
August, 380 

June  2,  Letter  received  in  Philadelphia  from  a  Gentleman 
in  Boston.  Closing  the  Port.  Proposition  to 
pay  for  the  Tea.  General  Gage  ordered  the 
removal  of  the  Province  Money  from  Boston 
to  Salem.  Treasurer  refused  to  comply,  -  380 
2,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Eng- 
land,   302 

2,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Norfolk,  Virginia, 

to  the  Baltimore  Committee.  The  late  Acts  of 
Parliament  viewed  as  fatal  to  the  liberties  of 
the  Colonies,  and  as  a  publick  robbery  of  our 
rights.  The  policy  of  attacking  a  Town  or 
Province  singly,  will  never  so  delude,  as  to  dis- 
unite us  from  a  joint  and  universal  opposition 
of  all  British  America,         -         -         -         -     371 

3,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Norfolk,  Virginia, 

to  the  Boston  Committee.  Are  not  indifferent 
spectators  of  the  distresses  of  Boston,  under  the 
cruel  exertion  of  British  power.  Observed  the 
first  of  June  as  a  day  of  fasting  and  prayer. 
Consider  Boston  as  suffering  in  the  common 
cause,  and  feel  bound  by  the  most  solemn  and 
sacred  ties  to  support  them  in  every  measure  to 
regain  their  rights  and  privileges,  -         -     371 

3,  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  General 
Gage.  Encloses  Acts  for  the  better  govern- 
ment of,  and  the  administration  of  Justice  in, 
Massachusetts  Bay.  The  King  has  nominated 
thirty-six  persons  for  the  Council  of  Massachu- 
setts. Mr.  Oliver,  of  Cambridge,  appointed 
Lieutenant  Governour.  Instructions.  Vio- 
lences must  be  resisted  with  firmness.  The  Acts 
of  Parliament  must  he  obeyed  throughout  the 
whole  Empire,  .....     38O 

3,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  for 

Connecticut  to  the  Committee  of  Correspond- 
ence for  Boston.  The  Assembly  at  their  ses- 
sion, which  closed  this  day,  came  to  Resolu- 
tions relative  to  their  rights  and  privileges. 
Resolves  of  Colonies  will  have  more  weight 
than  those  of  the  Merchants  of  separate  Towns; 
and  measures  recommended  by  the  whole 
tmited  Colonies  will  have  still  greater  weight 
and  influence,  -         .         .         -         .         304 

4,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  for 

Connecticut  to  the  New. York  Committee,  en- 
closing a  copy  of  the  preceding  Letter,  which 
they  have  also  sent  to  Rhode-Island  and  New- 
Hampshire,        ......     304 

4,  The  King's  birth-day.  Not  a  house  illuminated 
at  Charlestown;  no  demonstrations  of  joy, 
(Note,) 382 

4,     Address  to  the  People  of  Charlestown,  South 

Carolina, 382 

4,  Anne  Arundel  County,  Maryland,  Resolutions. 
Duty  of  all  the  Colonies  to  unite  for  obtaining 
a  repeal  of  the  Boston  Port  Bill.  A  stoppage 
of  Trade  with  Great  Britain  and  the  West 
Indies  the  most  effectual  means  to  obtain  a 
repeal.  Provincial  Congress  recommended; 
Members  for  Anne  Arundel  County  appointed,  384 
Questions  submitted  to  the  consideration  of  the 
Committee  for  Anne  Arundel  County,  (Note,)     385 

4,  Letter  received  at  New-York  from  a  Gentleman 
of  Philadelphia.  Some  of  the  friends  of  Bos- 
ton here  are  too  warm,  and  wish  to  push  all 
things  into  confusion.  Our  Letter,  (of  May 
21,)  moderate,  yet  warm  and  firm  enough,      -     386 

4,  Letter  from  Joseph  Johnson,  an  Indian  of  the 
Mohegan  Tribe,  to  Jonathan  Trumbull,  Gov- 
ernour of  Connecticut,  ....     386 

6,  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dunmore,  Williamsburg, 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Cannot  tell  to  what 
lengths  the  People  of  Virginia  will  be  indu. 
ced  to  proceed.  Members  of  the  late  House  of 
Burgesses,  after  the  arrival  of  the  Boston  mes- 
senger, called  a  meeting  of  the  People,  and  pro. 
posed  to  them  to  agree  to  the  violent  measures 
adopted  at  Annapolis,  which,  that  they  may  be 
more  solemnly  entered  into,  have  deferred  the 
execution  of  it  to  the  first  day  of  Aiigust, 
when  all  the  Members  of  the  late  House  of 
Burgesses  are  required  to  attend,  .         -     387 

G,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders,  Merchants  and 
other  Inhabitants  of   the  County  of   Prince 


XLIII 


CONTENTS. 


XLIV 


1774.       William,  and  Town  of  Dumfries,  in  the  Colony 
of  Virginia,        •*"■.'" 
June  6,  Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Gentlenwn  in  Bos- 
ton.    Reasons  why  Boston  should  not  pay  fof 
the  Tea,  --■■.•" 

6,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
Township  of  Lower  Freehold,  in  the  County 
of  Monmouth,  in  New-Jersey,      .         -         - 

6,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Nor- 

wich, in  the  Colony  of  Connecticut,  legally 
wamtxl  and  convened,  .... 

7,  Meeting  of  the   Inhabitants  of  Essex  County, 

New- Jersey,  called,    .        -         -         -        - 
7,      Letter  from  the  Committee  of  New- York  to  the 
Committee  of  Correspondence  in  Boston, 

7,  Offer  by  the  Merchants  and  Traders  of  Marble- 

head,  of  their  Stores  and  Wharves,  to  their  op- 
pressed brethren  of  Boston,  during  the  opera- 
tion of  the  Boston  Port  Bill,         .         .         - 

8,  Petition  of  sundry  Inhabitants  of  the  Province  of 

Pennsylvania  to  Governour  Penn,  to  call  to- 
gether the  Assembly,  on  occasion  of  the  late 
Act  of  Parliament  respecting  the  Town  of 
Boston,  ...  -  ■  ".  .* 
Answer  of  the  Governour.  Does  not  think  it 
expedient  or  consistent  with  his  duty,     - 

8,  Meetmg  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Frederick,  in  Virginia, 
and  Grentlemen  practising  at  the  Bar,  held  in 
Winchester,       ...--- 

8,  Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.  Took  pains  to  prerail  upon 
tlie  Assembly  not  to  enter  into  extra  Provincial 
measures ;  yet  Committees  of  Correspondence 
were  appointed.  They  were  adjourned  imme- 
diately, and,  since  then,  kept  under  short  ad- 
journments, in  hopes  to  obtain  a  suspension  of 
their  votes.     Dissolved  the  Assembly  this  day, 

8,  Message  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  As- 
sembly of  New-Hampshire.  Measures  en- 
tered into  by  the  House  inconsistent  with  his 
Majesty's  service.  His  duty  to  prevent  any 
detriment  that  might  arise  from  such  Proceed- 
ings ;  therefore  dissolves  the  Assembly, 

8,  Expressat  Williamsburg  from  Pittsburgh.  Shaw- 
anese  have  declared  war  against  the  Whites, 

8,  Letter  III,  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  British  Col- 
onies in  America,  ..... 
Letter  to  the  Author  of  the  Letters  to  the  Inhab- 
itants of  the  British  Colonies  in  America, 

8,      Address  of  the  Boston  Committee  sent  to  the  Peo- 
ple of  every  Town  in  the  Province,  with  the 
Covenant,  ...... 

Form  of  the  Covenant  sent  to  every  Town  in 
Massachusetts,  ..... 

8,      Address  of  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others,  of 
Boston,  presented  to  Governour  Gage,  at  Sa- 
lem, ....... 

CJovernour  Gage's  Answer,    .... 

8,  Resolutions  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of 

Massachusetts.  Convening  the  General  As- 
sembly at  any  other  place  than  Boston,  uime- 
cessarily,  a  great  Grievance, 

9,  Answer  of  the  House  of  Representatives  to  the 

Speech  of  Governour  Gage,  at  the  opening  of 
the  Session,       ...... 

9,  Answer  of  the  Council  to  the  Governour's 
Speech,     ....... 

13,  Committee  of  the  Covuicil  presented  the  Address 
to  the  Governour.  The  Chairman  not  permit- 
ted to  read  it  through,  .... 

13,  Messageof  Governour  Gage  to  the  Coimcil.  His 
reason  for  refiising  to  receive  the  Address. 
Considers  it  an  insult  to  the  King,  and  an  af- 
front to  himself,  ..... 

1 1,      Address  of  Merchants  and  others,  Inhabitants  of 

Salem,  to  Governour  Gage,  ... 

Answer  of  the  Governour,       .... 

11,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Harford  County, 
Maryland,  ...... 

11,  Meeting  of  the  Freemen  in  the  lower  part  of 
Frederick  County,  Maryland,       ... 

11,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
the  County  of  Essex,  New-Jersey, 

11,  Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  the 
Committee  of  Correspondence  for  Connecticut, 

1 1 ,  Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  Bernard 
Liutot.     The  hints  he  has  furnished  very  pro- 


388 


388 


390 


390 
-     391 


303 


391 


391 


-     391 


-     392 


393 


394 


394 
394 


395 


397 


397 


398 
399 


-     399 


400 


400 


401 


401 


1774. 


Jvne 
13. 


13, 
13, 
13, 


13, 
13, 

13, 

14. 

14, 
15, 
15, 
15. 


16, 

16, 
17. 

17, 


17, 
17, 


17. 
17. 


401 
402 

18, 

402 

18, 

403 

18, 

305 

18, 

18. 

per  for  the  consideration  of  a  General  Congress 
of  Deputies  from  the  different  Colonies  ;  what 
can  or  will  be  done,  must  be  submitted  to  the 
wisdom  of  their  united  Councils,  -         -      306 

Letter  from  Norwich,  in  England,  to  a  Gentleman 
in  New- York.  Distresses  of  Manufacturers 
in  England,  in  consequence  of  the  measures  of 
Parliament  towards  America,       ...     404 

Intelligence  at  W'illiamsburg,  Virginia.  War 
with  the  Indians, 405 

Meeting  of  Mechanicks  at  Philadelphia,  held  on 
Thursday  evening,  the  9th,  -         -         -     405 

Letter  from  George  Clymer,  Philadelphia,  to 
Josiah  Quincy,  Jim.  New- York  and  Penn- 
sylvania object  to  the  suspension  of  Tr.ide  pro- 
posed by  Boston.  Pennsylvania  appears  de- 
terminetl  on  the  Congress.  General  Subscrip- 
tion opened  for  relief  of  Boston,  -         -     406 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Parish  of 
Soutifi-Haven,  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  New- 
York,       -         -         -         -         -         -         -     407 

Meeting  of  the  General  Committee,  Charlestown, 
South  Carolina.  General  Meeting  of  the  Col- 
ony called,  to  consider  of  the  steps  proper  to 
be  taken  in  consequence  of  the  late  hostile  Act 
of  the  British  i'arliament  against  Boston,       -     408 

Letter  from  CharlestowTi,  South  Carolina,  to  a 
Gentleman  of  New- York.  Merchants  now 
generally  in  favour  of  Non- Importation,        -     408 

Letter  from  Charlestown,  South  Carolina,  to  Phil- 
adelphia. Charlestown  will  join  in  whatever 
New-York  and  Philadelphia  may  adopt,         -     408 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Charles  County, 
Maryland, 409 

Letter  IV,  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  British  Colo- 
nies in  America,  -         -         -         -         -     4 1 0 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Borough  of 
Lancaster,  Pennsylvania,     -         -        -         -     415 

Resolutions  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Eng- 
lish Colony  of  Rhode-Island  and  Providence 
Plantations.  Firm  and  inviolable  union  of  all 
the  Colonies  absolutely  necessary  for  the  pre- 
servation of  their  rights  and  liberties.  Dele- 
gates to  the  Continental  Congress  appointed — 
Instructions  to  the  Delegates,         ... 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Dunmore,  Virginia,     - 

The  British  American,  No.  4,  ... 

Writs  for  an  election  of  a  new  Assembly  ordered 
by  the  Governour  and  Council  of  Virginia,     - 

Address  to  the  Gentlemen,  Freeholders,  and 
others,  in  the  County  of  New-Castle,  upon 
Delaware.  Enumeration  of  Grievances.  Meet- 
ing of  the  Inliabitants  of  the  Coimty  recom- 
mended, ...... 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  East- 
Hampton,  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  New- 
York,       ....... 

Resolutions  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of 
Massachusetts.  A  Congress  highly  expedient 
and  necessary,  to  consult  upon  the  present 
state  of  the  Colonies.  Delegates  on  the  part 
of  the  Province  appointed.  Discontinuance 
of  the  use  of  India  Teas,  and  of  the  use  of  all 
Goods  and  Manufactures  imported  from  the 
East  Indies  and  Great  Britain,  recommended. 
Encouragement  of  American  Manufactures, 
recommended,  -        -         -         -         -     421 

The  General  Assembly  dissolved  by  Governour 
Gage,       .......     422 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  Town  of  Boston,         ...     423 

None  at  the  Meeting  in  fiivour  of  paying  for  the 
Tea,  (Note,) 423 

All  the  Colonies  in  motion.  Subscriptions  for 
support  of  Boston  Poor,  (Note,)  -        -     423 

Address  of  Merchants  and  Freeholders  of  Salem, 
to  Governour  Gage,  ....     424 

Answer  of  the  Governour,      ....     425 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Caroline  County, 

Maryland,  ......     425 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Freemen  of  the 
City  and  County  of  Philadelphia,  -         -     426 

SpeecL  of  the  Reverend  William  Smith  at  the 
Meeting,  -  ....     407 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
the  County  of  Chester,  Pennsyh-ania,     -         -     428 

Letter  from  Governour  Franklm,  Burlington,  to 


416 

417 
418 

419 


419 


420 


1774. 


CONTENTS. 


XLVI 


June 
19. 


19, 

20, 
20, 

20, 
20, 

20, 
21, 
21, 

22, 
22, 

22, 


22, 

22, 

22, 

23, 
23, 

23, 


24, 


24. 


the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  Transmits  a  copy 
of  the  Resolutions  adopted  at  the  Meeting  in 
Essex  County.  Has  refused  to  convene  the 
Assembly  in  August.  The  other  Counties  are 
expected  to  follow  the  example  of  Essex  ;  but 
it  is  doubtful  whether  they  will  agree  to  a  gen- 
eral Non-Importation.  Their  principal  aim 
seems  to  be  a  Congress,       .... 

Letter  from  Fort  Pitt  to  Philadelphia.  Connolly 
refused  protection  to  three  Shawanese  who  had 
escorted  the  Traders  in  with  their  Peltry; 
Sent  a  party  to  cut  them  off.  Logan  returned 
to  the  Shawanese  Towns  with  thirteen  Scalps, 

Letter  from   Boston  to  New- York.     Attempts 

to  procure  an  Agreement  to  pay  for  the  Tea, 

defeated,  ...... 

Address  to  the  Lrhabitants  of  the  Province  of 
South  Carolina,  .         .         .         .         - 

Letters  from  southern  parts  of  North  Carolina. 
Inhabitants  there,  recommend  that  Collections 
be  set  on  foot  throughout  the  Continent  for  re- 
lief of  the  most  distressed  in  Boston, 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Frederick  Coun- 
ty, iVIaryland,     -         .         .         -         - 

Letter  from  Jolm  Dickinson,  Fairhill,  to  Josiah 
Quincy,  Jun.  The  Colonies  very  unanimous 
in  favour  of  a  Congress,      .... 

"An  American."  On  the  means  of  obtaining 
relief,       ....... 

Letter  from  Cave  Cumberland.  Indian  War 
caused  by  Cresap  and  Greathouse, 

Meeting  of  the  Justices,  Gentlemen  of  the  Bar, 
and  principal  Inhabitants  of  Northampton 
County,  Pennsylvania,         .... 

Letter  from  England  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.     State  of  affairs  in  England, 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Westmoreland,  in  Vir- 
ginia,        

Maryland  Convention.  Delegates  to  the  Con- 
vention. Resolutions. — Duty  of  every  Colony 
to  unite  against  Boston  Port  Bill.  Should 
stop  Trade  with  Great  Britain  if  the  Act  is 
not  repealed.  Instructions  to  Deputies  to  the 
Congress.  Subscriptions  to  be  opened  in  the 
several  Counties  for  distressed  Inhabitants  of 
Boston.  Deputies  to  the  Congress  appointed. 
Will  break  off  Trade  with  the  Colony,  Prov- 
ince or  Tovra,  that  shall  refuse  to  unite  in  such 
measures  as  may  be  adopted  by  the  Congress, 

Reflections  on  appointing  Delegates  to  the  Gen- 
eral Congress.  Different  modes  of  appointing 
examined.  The  appointment  by  Provincial 
Conventions  recommended,  ... 

Letter  from  the  General  Association  of  Congre- 
gational Ministers  in  Connecticut,  to  the 
Clergymen  in  Boston,         .... 

Answer  to  the  preceding  Letter ;  prepared  but  not 
sent,  through  the  confusion  of  the  times. 

Address  of  the  Justices  of  the  County  of  Wor- 
cester, in  Massachusetts,  to  Governour  Gage, 

Answer  of  the  Governour,      .... 

Letters  from  Fort  Pitt.  White  Inhabitants  killed 
by  the  Indians, 

Extract  from  the  Proceedings  of  the  Town  of 
Windham,  in  Connecticut.  Addresses  to  Gov- 
ernour Hutchinson,  an  insult  to  the  Town  of 
Boston,     ....... 

Letter  from  Richard  Henry  Lee  to  Samuel 
Adams.  His  Resolutions  prepared  to  be  of- 
fered the  day  before  the  Assembly  was  dissolv- 
ed by  Lord  Dunmore.  After  the  dissolution, 
proposed  to  the  Members  the  plan  of  a  Con- 
gress. Indian  War  has  compelled  the  Govern- 
our to  call  a  new  Assembly.  When  they 
meet,  will  adopt  measures  for  redress  of  Griev- 
ances,   

Letter  from  Samuel  Adams  to  Richard  Henry 
Lee.  Inhabitants  of  Boston  encouraged  to 
persevere  by  intelligence  from  every  part  of 
the  Continent.  Lord  North  has  made  no  pre- 
paration for  the  effects  of  such  an  union. 
Address  to  the  Publick,  from  the  Committee  of 
Charlestown,  South  Carolina,  appointed  to  re- 
ceive and  forward  Donations  for  the  Poor  of 

Boston, 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
Spottsylvania  County,  Virginia,     - 


428 


428 


430 


430 


433 


-     433 


434 


434 


435 


435 


436 


437 


438 


441 


442 

443 

444 
445 

445 


445 


445 


447 


448 
448 


June 
27, 
17, 


May 
23, 
24, 

25, 

26, 

27, 

June 
28, 


28, 


28, 


May 
29, 


June  3 


449 


306 


450 


1774. 

June   Extracts  of  Letters  received  in  Philadelphia,  from 

24,  Pittsburgh.      Connolly's  proceedings  against 

tl»e  Pennsylvanians,  .... 

24,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence 

appointed  by  the  Assembly  of  New- York,  to 
the  Committee  of  Correspondence  for  Connec- 
ticut, -        - 

25,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 

the  County  of  Bergen,  in  the  Province  of 
New-Jersey,      ---... 

26,  Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 

mouth. The  General  Court  dissolved  by  Proc- 
lamation outside  of  the  door.  Several  Gentle- 
men, encouraged  by  the  late  Resolutions  of 
Government,  are  endeavouring  to  procure  a 
compliance  with  the  Boston  Port  Bill.  Nei- 
ther New- York,  Philadelphia,  nor  Boston  will 
agree  to  a  Non-Importation,  though  a  Con- 
gress of  some  sort  may  be  obtained.  The  ar- 
ri\'al  of  Troops  has  given  spirits  to  the  friends 
of  Government,  ..... 

27,  Peace  Talk  from  the  Creek  Indians  sent  to  Au- 

gusta, Georgia.  General  Meeting  of  all  the 
Warriors  of  the  Creek  Nation  called.  The 
Cherokecs  have  engaged  to  join  the  Creeks 
in  case  of  War,  ..... 

27,     Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 

Norfolk  and  Portsmouth,  in  Virginia,  -     45 1 

27,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
the  County  of  Morris,  in  the  Province  of  East 
New-Jersey,      -         .....     452 

27,  Letter  from  Huntington,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Enclosing  Resolutions  unanimously 
adopted  in  Tovvti  Meeting,  ...     453 

21,     General  Town  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of 

Huntington,  in  Suffolk  Coimty,  New- York,       453 

27,  Letter  from  Captain  John  Connolly,  Pittsburgh, 
to  a  Gentleman  in  Philadelphia.  Has  sent  a 
detachment  to  protect  the  Settlements  about 
Red  Stone  from  the  Shawanese,    -        -        -     454 


450 


451 


COUNCIL    OF    PENNSYLVANIA. 

Meeting  of  the  Council,  at  Philadelphia,  -    454 

Report  of  James  Tilghman  and  Andrew  Allen, 
Commissioners  appointed  by  the  Honourable 
John  Penn,  Esq.,  Governour  of  Pennsylvania, 
to  treat  with  the  Right  Honourable  the  Earl  of 
Dunmore,  Governour  of  Virginia,  on  sundry 
publick  matters,  -        -         -         -         -     454 

Letter  from  James  Tilgliman  and  Andrew  Allen, 
Williamsburg,  to  Lord  Dunmore,  -         -     455 

Letter  from  Lord  Dunmore,  Williamsburg,  to 
James  Tilghman  and  Andrew  Allen,  -     456 

Letter  from  James  Tilghman  and  Andrew  Allen, 
Williamsburg,  to  Lord  Dunmore,  -         -     457 

Letter  from  Lord  Dunmore,  Williamsburg,  to 
James  Tilghman  and  Andrew  Allen,     -         -     459 

Letter  from  James  Tilghman  and  Andrew  Allen, 
Williamsburg,  to  Lord  Dmimore,  -         -     461 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn,  Philadelphia,  to 
Sir  William  Johnson.  Requests  his  interposi- 
tion and  influence  to  induce  the  Six  Nations  to 
become  mediators  between  Pennsylvania  and 
the  Shawanese  and  Delawares,     -         -         -     461 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Lord  Dunmore. 
Danger  of  a  general  Indian  War,  unless  Peim- 
sylvania  and  Virginia  prevent  further  progress 
of  hostilities.  Conduct  of  Doctor  Connolly; 
his  Military  operations  dangerous  to  the  peace 
of  the  Colonies  in  general.  Hopes  Lord  Dun- 
more does  not  encourage  Connolly  in  the  out- 
rages laid  to  his  charge,        -         -         -         -     46 1 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Arthur  St.  Clair. 
Measures  should  be  taken  to  prevent  the  re- 
moval of  the  White  Inhabitants  from  the  Fron- 
tiers, and  to  induce  those  who  have  gone  to  re- 
turn. Has  convened  the  Assembly,  who  will 
adopt  measures  to  afford  effectual  relief;  in  the 
mean  time  he  will  send  further  supplies  of  Am- 
mmiition, 462 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernour Penn.  Alarm  among  the  People.  A 
company  of  one  hundred  Rangers  formed  for 
defence  of  Frontiers,  ....     453 

,  Letter  from  John  Montgomery,  Carlisle,  to  Gov- 
ernour Penn.    People  in  Westmoreland  Coun- 


JXVII 

1774. 


CONTENTS. 


XLVIII 


June 
3, 


5, 


10, 


12, 


12, 
10. 


14, 
16, 

19, 
20, 


22, 


-     4G3 


4G4 


464 


4G5 


465 


ty  in  great  conftision ;  in  want  of  Arms  and 
Ammunition;  unless  specxlily  furnished  they 
must  leave  the  Country,       *         "        '        . 

Letter  from  John  Montgomery,  Carlisle,  to  Wil- 
liam Allen.  Distresses  of  the  Country.  Dela- 
ware Indians  well  disposed,  but  Shawanese  de- 
ttrmint-d  on  war.  Chie  hundred  Men  raised  to 
ran^e  from  Fort  Pitt  to  Ligonicr.  Other  pre- 
parations for  Defence,  .  .  .  - 
Indian  Intellis'ence.  Traders  on  the  Muskingum 
safe ;  the  ShawTinese  had  taken  preat  pains  in 
protecting  them.  Shawanese  quiet.  A  party 
of  Mingoes  out;  gone  agamst  that  part  of 
Virginia  where  their  friends  were  killed, 

Letter'from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Liiurel  Hill,  to  Gov- 
ernour  Penn.  Has  hitherto  thought  there 
would  be  no  war,  now  thinks  otherwise, 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,to  Govem- 
our  Penn.  Encloses  Letter  from  Mr.  Crogh- 
an,  ..-.-.- 

Letter  from  George  Croghan  to  Arthur  St.  Clair. 
Employing  the  Rangers,  in  Pennsylvania,  has 
alanned  Connolly.  Measures  of  Connolly  to 
prevent  settlement  of  disputes,         ...     465 

Letter  from  Ale.xander  M'Kee,  Agent  for  Indian 
Affairs  at  Fort  Pitt.  Hostilities  between  In- 
dians and  Virginians.  Indians  have  given 
proof  of  their  pacifick  disposition.  Reason  to 
tear  the  war  will  become  general,  -         -     466 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernour  Penn.  Inhabitants  of  the  Frontiers 
alarmed,  and  retire  to  the  Forts,  or  leave  the 
Country.  In  the  Valley  they  still  make  a 
stand.  The  intention  of  the  Indians  will  soon 
be  known,         ......     466 

Letter  from  Devereux  Smith,  Pittsburgh,  to  Gov- 
ernour  Penn,      ......     467 

Letter  from  Devereux  Smith,  Pittsburgh,  to  Dr. 
Smith.  Extension  of  the  Virginia  Settlements 
the  cause  of  the  dissatisfaction  of  the  Indians. 
Account  of  the  origin  and  progress  of  the  In- 
dian  hostilities.  Connolly  determined  on  a 
war  with  the  Indians.  His  violent  proceedings 
against  the  Pennsylvania  Magistrates,     -         -    467 

Letter  from  .(Eneas  Mackay,  Pittsburgh,  to  Gov- 
ernour  Penn.      -        -        -        -        •        -471 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 
A  further  account  of  the  proceedings  of  Con- 
nolly, and  of  the  Indian  War.  Delawares  still 
friendly  to  Pennsylvania,     -         -         .         -     47 1 

Letter  from  William  Thompson,  Cumberland 
County,  to  Governour  Penn,         ...     473 

Letter  from  Lord  Dunmore,  at  Williamsburg,  to 
Captain  John  Connolly.  Approves  his  build- 
ing a  Fort  at  Wheeling,  and  of  marching  into 
the  Shawanese  Towns.  Ad\nses  him  to  make 
prisoners  of  as  many  Women  and  Children  as 
he  can;  and  not  to  make  peace  mitil  the  Indians 
are  effectually  chastised,      ....     473 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernour Perm.     Two  of  the  principal  Traders 
arrived  safe  at  Pittsburgh,  under  protection  of 
Sliawanese  Chiefs.     Connolly  ordered  out  a 
party  to  make   prisoners  of  the  Shawanese 
Chiefs.  Those  about  Fort  Pitt,  (now  Fort  Dun- 
more,)  intent  on  a  war.  Has  had  a  meeting  with 
some  Six  Nations  and  some  Delawares,  and 
made  them  a  present,  in  the  name  of  the  Gov- 
ernour.    Logan  returned  with  thirteen  Scalps 
and  one  Prisoner,  and  says  he  will  now  listen 
to  the  Chiefs,       ......     473 

18,     Proclamation  by  John  Connolly,  at  Fort  Dun- 
more.     Prohibits  intercourse  with  the  Indians,     475 

Extracts  from  Mr.  M'Kee's  Journal  of  Indian 
Transactions,     .....      475-483 
JMay  1,  Message  to  King  Custologa,  Captains  White 
Eyes,  Pipe,  and  other  Chiefs, 

3,  Conference,  at  Colonel  Croghan's,  between  seve^ 

ral  Chiefs  and  Captain  Connolly,  and  others, 

4,  Arrival  of  several  Delaware  Chiefs, 
."i.     A  Condolence  held  with  the  Six  Nations,  Dela- 
wares, Shawanese,  Munsies,  Mohegans,  and 
Twightwees,      .... 

9,     Speech  delivered  by  several  Chiefs,  Six  Nations 
and  Delawares,  to  the  Governour  of  Viririnia, 

16,  Message  from  Custologa,  by  five  principal  Men 

of  the  Delawares,       .....     473 

17,  Answer  to  Custologa's  Message,       ...    473 


-    475 

475 
476 


-     476 


477 


1774. 

May 
21, 
21, 
25, 


Message  received  from  the  Delaware  Chiefs  at 
Newcomer's  Town,  .... 

Answer  to  the  Message  of  the  Delaware  Chiefs, 

Answer  of  the  Delawares  to  the  Condolence 
Speeches,  .         .         .         .         - 

Answer  of  the  Shawanese  to  the  Condolence 
Speeches,  ...... 

Speech  of  Arthur  St  Clair  to  the  Six  Nations 
and  Delawares,  .... 

Speech  to  the  Delawares,  on  receiving  their  An- 
swer to  the  Condolence  Speeches, 

Reply  of  Captain  White  Eyes,         .         .         - 
June  1,  Arrival  of  Moravian  Indians,  ... 

5,      Messengers  from  Newcomer,  with  intelligence. 

Answer  sent  by  the  Messengers,       ... 

Answer  of  Lord  Dunmore,  at  Williamsburg,  to 
the  Speech  of  the  Six  Nations  and  Delawares, 
at  Pittsburgh,  May  9th, 
Ja-««  9,  Message  sent  with  Lord  Dunmore's  Speech  to 
the  Six  Nations  and  Delawares, 

Letter  from  William  Thompson,  in  Cumberland 
Coimty,  to  Governour  Penn,         ... 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernour Penn.  Connolly  has  sent  in  pursuit  of 
the  Shawanees  who  escorted  the  Traders, 

Memorial  from  the  Inhabitants  of  Pittsburgh,  !» 
Governour  Penn.  Request  relief  from  their 
sufferings  under  the  arbitrary  proceedings  of 
Doctor  Connolly,        .         .         .         .         - 

Statement  of  the  Grievances  of  the  People  of 
Pittsburgh,  occasioned  by  the  tyrarmical  con- 
duct of  Doctor  Connolly,  ... 


26, 
26, 


May 
29, 


22, 
26, 


25, 


25, 


478 
478 

-  479 
479 

-  480 

480 
481 
481 
481 

482 


482 


483 
483 


483 


483 


484 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

June   Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 

28,  the  Assembly  of  Pennsylvania,  to  the  Commit- 
tee of  Correspondence  of  Massachusetts  Bay. 
The  great  cause  of  American  Rights  should 
be  left  to  the  Representatives  in  every  Colony. 
Until  this  shall  be  fairly  tried  and  fail,  no  other 
mode  should  be  attempted.  A  Congress,  con- 
stitutionally chosen,  to  ascertain  our  rights,  and 
establish  a  political  union  between  Great  Bri- 
tain and  the  Colonies,  would  effectually  secure 

to  Americans  their  future  rights  and  privileges,     485 
Remarks  on  the  preceding  Letter,  (Note,)  -     486 

27,      Address  to  the  People  of  Boston,  on  paying  for 

the  Tea, 487 

27,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  Town  of  Boston,  at  Faneuil  Hall. 
Correspondence  of  the  Committee  ordered  to  be 
produced  and  read.  Motion  to  censure  and  an- 
nihilate the  Committee.  Gentlemen  in  favour 
of  the  motion  patiently  heard ;  at  their  request 
the  Meeting  adjourned  tmtil  to-morrow  morn- 
ing. The  qtiestion  then  taken,  and  the  mo- 
tion rejected  by  a  vast  majority.  Conduct  of 
the  Committee  approved,      ....     439 

29,  Protest  against  the  Proceedings  of  the   Town 

Meeting  in  Boston,  held  on  the  27th  of  June; 
against  the  doings  of  the  Committee  of  Cor- 
respondence, and  against  the  Solemn  League 
and  Covenant,  .....     499 

29,  Proclamation  by  Governour  Gage,  for  discour- 
aging of  certain  illegal  Combinations.  The 
League  and  Covenant  an  unlawful  instrument, 
and  the  Letter  of  the  Committee  accompany- 
ing it,  scandalous,  traitorous,  and  seditious. 
All  persons  cautioned  against  signing  the  Co- 
venant, -  -  -  -  .  -  -491 
Remarks  upon  the  Proclamation,  (Note,)  -     492 

29,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Freemen  of  the 

County  of  Richmond,  in  Virginia,         -         -     492 
Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
Prince  George's  County,  Virginia,         -         -     493 

30,  The  British  American,  No.  5,  ...     495 
July  1,  Letter  from  London,  received  in  Philadelphia. 

Men  in  power  in  England  wish  for  an  Indian 
war,  as  a  means  of  humbling  and  reducing  the 
rebellious  Colonies.  Policy  of  Great  Britain 
in  regard  to  the  Colonies,  is  to  divide  and  con- 
quer. Nothing  but  an  union  of  the  Colonics 
to  stop  Trade  will  save  America,  -         -     498 

1,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  James  City  Coun- 
ty, Virginia,       ---...     499 

1,  Tea,  at  Portsmouth,  in  New- Hampshire,  re-ship- 
ped by  order  of  the  Town,  -        .        ,     499 


XL  IX 


CONTENTS. 


1774. 

CONSTITCTIONAL  POST  omCB. 

Jvly  2,  Mr.  Goddard's  Proposal  for  establishing  an  Ame- 
rican Post  Office  has  been  warmly  patronized 
in  the  Eastern  Colonics,  and  preparations  have 
been  made  for  the  conveyance  of  the  Mail,  -  500 
Plan  for  the  establishing  a  new  American  Post 
Office, 500 

lU'ry  Letter  to  Lord  North.      Dismissing  Dr.  Frank- 
5,  lin  from  the  Post  Office  one  of  the  most  for- 

tunate events  for  America.  The  Americana 
will  set  up  a  Post  Office  of  their  own,  and  put 
aji  end  to  the  precedent,  so  often  referred  to,  for 
Taxing  them,  (Note,)  -         .         .         .     500 

28,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Bos- 

ton. Our  tame  submission  to  the  Post  Office 
Establishment  has  been  constantly  urged  as  a 
precedent  for  all  other  unconstitutional  Acts. 
If  we  oppose  it  now,  with  manly  firmness,  we 
cannot  fail  of  success.  Mr.  Goddard's  Plan  is 
well  calculated  to  save  the  cause  of  Liberty, 

«■      .,J^°'®') 500 

March  Mr.  Goddard  at  Boston.    He  has  received  the 

17,  greatest  encouragement  from  all  the  Colonies 
through  which  he  has  passed.  At  a  Meeting 
in  Boston,  it  was  determined  to  unite  with  the 
Southern  Colonies  in  support  of  this  measure 
for  the  recovery  of  American  Liberty,  (Note,)  500 
Heads  of  a  Subscription  Paper,  for  the  establish- 
ment of  an  American  Post  Office,  laid  before 
the  Committee  of  Correspondence  at  Boston, 
(Note,) 501 

29,  Mr.  Goddard  at  Salem,  on  the  subject  of  estab- 

lishing a  Post  Office  independent  of  the  un- 
constitutional Laws  of  a  British  Parliament, 

(Note,) 501 

April   Mr.  Goddard  at  Portsmouth :  At  a  Meeting  of 

15,         the  Committee  of  Merchants,    Traders,  and 

other  Inhabitants,  a  Subscription  to  support  the 

American   Post   Office,  unanimously  agreed 

upon,  (Note,)  502 

21,  Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Gentleman  at  Wil- 
liamsburg. The  Post  Office  as  established  is 
an  infringement  of  American  Liberties ;  but  the 
new  one  proposed  can  scarcely  succeed  under 
Mr,  Goddard.  The  Merchants  of  Philadel- 
phia have  preferred  Mr.  Bradford  for  the  pri- 
vate Post  set  up  between  that  place  and  Phil- 
adelphia, (Note,)         502 

21,     Mr.  Goddard  at  Boston,  with  Letters  from  To\vns 
to  the  Eastward,  expressing  their  concurrence 
in  the  establishment  of  a  Post  Office,  on  consti- 
tutional principles,  throughout  the  Continent. 
The  removal  of  Dr.  Franklin  from  the  Post 
Office  has  added  fresh  spirit  to  the  promoters 
of  this  salutary  plan,  (Note,)         ...     503 
May  5,  The  Subscription  for  establishing  an  American 
Post  Office  has  been  liberally  patronized. — 
Mr.  Goddard  will  return  homeward,  rejoicing 
in  the  great  success  which  has  attended  his  en. 
deavours  to  rescue  the  channel  of  publick  and 
private  intelligence  from  the  horrid  fangs  of 
Ministerial  despotism,  (Note,)        ...     503 
19,     The  report  that  the  Constitutional  Post  Rider 
between  Philadelphia  and  Baltimore,  with  a 
large  sum  of  money  entrusted  to  his  care,  had 
absconded,  is  untrue,  (Note,)         -         -         -     503 
June  2,  Mr.  Goddard  at  New- York,  with  important  de- 
spatches for  all  the  Southern  Colonies,  the  plan 
for  establishing  a  Constitutional  American  Post 
Office  having  met  with  the  greatest  success  in 
all  the  great  Commercial  Towns  ia  the  North- 
ern Colonics,  (Note,)  ....     503 
16,     Information  of  the  proceedings  in  the  Colonies  for 
the  establishment  of  an  American  Post  Office 
received  in  London.     When  General  Gage  ar- 
rives in  America,  he  will  stop  the  career  of  the 
new  Post  Riders  and  their  employers,  (Note,)      503 
July  6,  Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Gentleman  in  Wil. 
liamsburg.    Objections  to  Mr.  Goddard.    At  a 
Meeting  of  the  Mechanicks,  they  refused  to 
hear  read  Letters  relating  to  the  establishment 
of  the  Post  Office,  as  the  Americans  had  enough 
to  do  already,  (Note,)  ....     503 
16,     The  Deputy  Postmasters  General  of  North  Ame^ 
rica  alarmed  at  the  progress  making  to  establish 
a  new  Post  Office,  (Note,)  ...     504 
25,     Letter  from  Baltimore  to  a  Gentleman  in  Wil. 
liamsburg.      A  complete  plan  of  establishing  a 

FouETH  Series. 


1T74. 

new  American  Post  Office  has  been  executed 
throughout  the  New  England  Governments. 
Mr.  Goddard  will  leave  here  for  Williams- 
burg, to  lay  his  plan  before  the  Convention, 

(Note,) 504 

Aug.  Mr.  Goddard's  Plan  for  establishing  an  Ameri. 
1 1,  can  Post  Office  was  agitated  at  the  Convention 
in  Virginia,  \vho  considered  it  worthy  the  at- 
tention of  the  General  Congress,  and,  as  such, 
particularly  recommended  it  to  the  Delegates 
from  Virginia,  (Note,)         .        -        .        -504 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

July  3,  Letter  from  Boston,  received  in  New. York. 
Distresses  of  the  People  there ;  their  patience, 
resolution,  and  firmness.  The  League  and 
Covenant  very  generally  signed,  notwthstand- 
ing  the  Governour's  Proclamation,        -         .     505 

4,  Letter  from  Carlisle,  received  in  Philadelphia. 
Connolly's  attack  on  the  Shawanese,  who  pro. 
tected  the  Traders.  Letter  of  thanks  from 
Ijord  Dunmore  to  Cresap,  who  first  began  the 
quarrel  with  the  Indians,     ....     505 

4,     Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 

Orange  To\vn,  in  the  Province  of  New. York,     506 

4,  Opinions  in  London  of  the  state  of  affairs  in  the 
Colonies.  The  faction  in  Boston  composed  of 
Smuggling  Companies,  Mechanicks,  Mer- 
chants indebted  in  England,  and  those  who 
are  fascinated  with  the  extravagant  notion  of 
Independency.  Seditious  Committees  appoint- 
ed to  influence  the  other  Colonies.  From  Let- 
ters and  other  intelligence,  it  is  evident  that  no 
permanent  or  vigorous  measures  of  resistance 
can  be  adopted  to  support  the  Boston  Rebels,        507 

4,  Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Province  of 
South  Carolina,  about  to  assemble  on  the  6th 
of  July, 508 

4,  Letter  from  Governour   Wentworth,  in   New- 

Hampshire,  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Twen- 
ty-seven chests  of  Tea  landed  and  stored  at  the 
Custom- House.  The  Consignee  agreed  with 
the  Committee  of  Portsmouth  to  re-ship  it. 
Mob  prevented  from  destroying  the  Tea.  Ves- 
sel with  the  twenty.seven  chests  sailed  for  Hali- 
fax, June  30,       512 

5,  Letter  from  a  Gentleman  in  London,  to  his  Cor- 

respondent  in  Philadelphia,  .         -         -     513 

5,  Letter  from  Governour  Penn,  Philadelphia,  to 
the  Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Temper  of  the  Peo- 
pie  very  warm.  They  consider  Boston  as  suf- 
fering in  the  common  cause, 
5,  Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  British  Colonies 
in  America,  (Note,)  -  -  .  -  . 
Reply  to  the  preceding  Address,  (Note,)     . 

5,  Letter  from  Governour  Grage,  at  Salem,  to  the 

Earl  of  Dartmouth.  A  number  attended  the 
late  Town  Meeting,  to  make  a  push  to  pay  for 
the  Tea,  and  annihilate  the  Committee  of  Cor- 
respondence, but  were  out-voted  by  a  great 
majority  of  the  lower  class.  Has  done  all  in 
his  power  to  spirit  up  every  friend  to  Govern- 
ment ;  and  there  is  now  an  open  opposition  to 
the  faction.  The  terrour  of  Mobs  is  over,  and 
the  Press  is  becoming  free,  ... 

6,  Address  of  the  Justices  of  the  County  of  Ply. 

mouth,  to  Governour  Gage,  ... 

The  Governour's  Answer,       .... 

6,  Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  Went  with  the  Council  and  the 
Sheriff  and  dispersed  an  illegal  Meeting,  held 
for  the  purpose  of  appointing  Delegates  to  a 
General  American  Congress,        ... 

6,  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Golden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  After  a  continual  strug- 
gle  of  many  weeks  in  the  New.  York  Commit- 
tee, they  have  carried  the  nomination  of  Depu- 
ties to  the  Congress.  These  transactions  are 
dangerous  and  illegal,  but  cannot  be  prevented. 
The  Province  every  where,  except  in  the  City 
of  New- York,  perfectly  quiet,       -        -         -     517 

6,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  City  of  New- 
York,  convened  in  the  Fields,       -         -         -     312 

6,  Letter  from  Alexandria,  in  Virginia,  to  a  Gen- 
tleman in  Boston.  Subscriptions  for  the  relief 
of  the  Poor  in  Boston,         -        -        -        -     517 


-     514 

300 
399 


514 

515 
516 


516 


lA 

1774. 

July 

6. 

6. 


CONTENTS. 


Ui 


7, 
7. 

8, 

8. 
8. 
8, 
8. 


518 


Mminffofthe  Freeholders,  Merchants.  1  raders, 
and  other  U»habitants  of  the  County  and  Bo- 
rouffh  of  Norfolk,  in  Virginia,      -         - 
Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Governour 
Ponn      Requires  him  to  exert  every  power  the 
Constitution  has  placed  in  his  hands  to  defeat 
any  attempt  to  insult  the  authority  of  Great 
Britain,     -         •         -        ",',.' 
Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmftuth  to  Lieutenant 
Governour  Golden.  Hopre  the  People  of  IN  ew- 
York  will  not,  by  their  rash  proceedings,  ex- 
pose themselves  to  the  just  resentment  of  l^r- 
liament,     --•"""" 
The  British  American,  No.  6,  "  ,      -^. 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  the  County  of  Culpepper,  in  Virginia,         - 
Proclamation  of  Lord  Dunmore.     Prorogues  the 
Assembly  from  August  U,  to  first  Ihursday 
in  November,     -         -        -        "         " 
Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson,  I^ndon,  to  a 
Friend  in  Boston.    Urges  the  payment  for  the 
Tea,  by  the  Town  of  Boston,         '     ,    '^     " 
Resolutions  unanimously  adopted  by  the  Free- 
holders and  Inhabitants  of  Hunterdon  County, 
in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey, 
Letter  from  Charlestown,  in  South  Carolina,  re- 
ceived in  New- York.     Account  of  the  Meet- 
ing held  in  Charlesto^vn,  on  the  6th,      -         - 
Resolutions  unanimously  entered  into  by  the  In- 
habitants of  South  Carolina,  at  a  CJeneral  Meet- 
ing held  at  Charlestown,  in  said  Colony,  on 
Wednesday,  Thursday,  and  Friday,  the  6th. 
7th,  and  8th  days  of  July,     -         -         -        ■ 
British  Subjects  in  America  owe  the  same  allegi- 
ance to  the  CrowTi,  and  are  entitled  to  the  same 
rights  with  Subjects  born  in  Great  Britain,     - 
No  Taxes  can  be  imposed  on  the  People,  but  by 
their  own  consent,       ""'"," 
It  is  a  fundamental  right  of  his  Majesty  s  Sub- 
jects, that  no  Man  shall  sufTer,  in  person  or  pro- 
perty, without  a  fair  trial,     -         -        '  .  ,  ." 
Sending  a  person  beyond  the  Sea  to  be  tried  is 
oppressive,  illegal,  and  highly  derogatory  to 
British  Subjects, .        -         -        -         " .    ,  " 
The  Statute  of  Thirty-fifth  of  Henry  Eighth,  for 
Trial  of  Treasons  committed  out  of  the  IGng's 
Dominions,  does  not  extend  to  the  Colonies,     - 
The  Boston  Port  Act,  and  the  Acts  relating  to 
the  Government  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  are  of 
the  most  alarming   nature  to   all   America, 
though  levelled  immediately  at  the  People  of 

Boston,     """""■] 

It  is  the  duty  of  all  the  Colonies  to  assist  and 

support  the  People  of  Boston,  by  all  lawful 

ways  in  their  power,  -         -         -         - 

Delegates  to  the   General  Congress  appointed, 

and  instructed,  .        .         .         -         - 

While  the  oppressive  Acts  relative  to  Boston  are 

enforced,  will  contribute  towards  their  relief. 
Will,  by  all  means,  endeavour  to  preserve  har- 
mony and  union  amongst  all  the  Colonies, 
Committee  of  Ninety-Nine  appointed,  as  a  Gene- 
ral Committee  of  Correspondence, 
Names  of  the  Committee  for  Charlestown, 
Address  of  Francis  Lewis,  and  other  Members  of 
the  Committee,  to  the  Inhabitants  of  tlie  City 
and  Coimty  of  New- York,           ... 
Reply  to  the  Address,  by  "  One  of  the  Commit- 
tee,"   - 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  Esaex  County,  in  Virginia,       .         -         . 
General  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  the  Coun- 
ty of  Fauquier,  in  Virginia,  ... 
General  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Liliabi- 
lants  of  the  County  of  Naiisemond,  iu  Virginia, 
Letter  from  Charlestown,  in  South  Carolina,  to  a 
Correspondent  in  Boston.    Proceedings  on  the 
Resolutions  adopted  in  Charlestown, 
Account  of  the  Meeting  held  in  Charlestown,  on 

the  6th.  7th,  and  8th  days  of  July,  (Note,) 
Death  of  Sir  William  Jolmson,  (Note,)  - 
Letter  from  MiUs  Brewton,  Charlestown,  South 
Carolina,  to  Josiali  Q,uincy,  Jun.  Massachu- 
setts will  not  fall  for  want  of  friends ;  if  Boston 
does  but  persevere,  her  sisters  will  work  out 
her  salvation  without  the  Musket.  A  Sloop 
load  of  Rice  sent  to  Boston,  and  will  soon  send 
more,        ....... 


1774. 
July 

U'. 

12. 

13. 


519 

510 
519 

522 
523 
524 
524 
525 

525 

525 
525 

525 

525 

525 

526 

526 
526 
526 
526 


526 
5'26 


8, 

9. 
9. 
9, 
II, 
11, 


11, 
12, 


313 

314 
527 
528 
529 

531 

531 

645 


14, 

14, 
14, 
14, 
14, 


Committee  of  Inspection  appointed  at  Portsmouth, 

in  New-Hampshire,  ",',,■  *         7 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and   Inhabitants  ol 

the  County  of  New-K.nt,  in  Virginia  - 

Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  ii-arl 
of  Dartmouth.  The  Meeting  of  Representa- 
tives at  Portsmouth,  dispersed.  At  a  private 
meeting  a  Convention  cnlled  to  meet  at  Exeter, 
on  the  21st,  to  appoint  Delegates  to  the  Con- 
gress,       -  -  ■  T,     .',,■"  *r 

Express  at  Williamsburg,  with  intelligence  of 
skirmishes  with  the  Indians.  Militia  ordered 
out  by  the  Governour,         -         -       ," ,    , . ' 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders,  and  others,  Inhabit- 
ants of  Chesterfield  County,  Virginia,  - 

General  and  full  Meiting  of  the  Inhabitants  ol 
Gloucester  County,  Virginia,       -         '         ' 

General  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabit 
ants  of  Caroline  County,  Virginia, 

The  British  American,  No.  7,  -        •        ' 

COUNCIL  OF  PENNSYLVANIA. 


.     534 


535 


536 


536 

537 

-     538 

539 
541 


545 


545 


546 


546 

546 


July 
14      Meeting  of  the  Council  at  Philadelphia, 

June  Letters  laid  before  the  Board,  containing  favour- 

29,  able  accounts  of  the  disposition  of  the  Indians, 
Conclusion  of  Extract  from  Mr.  M'Kee's  Journal 

of  Indian  AfUiirs,  (see  page  483.)  Conference 
with  the  Indians  at  Pittsburgh.  Address  from 
the  Chiefs  of  the  Delawares.  Speech  of  Cap- 
tain White  Eyes, 

30,  Letter  from  John  Montgomery,  at   Carlisle,  to 

Governour  Penn.     Shawanese  seem  well  dis- 
posed.    Logan  returned  with  thirteen  scalps. 
Says  he  is  now  satisfied,  and  will  set  still  until 
he  hears  what  the  Long  Knife  will  say, 
July  2,  Letter  from  Richard  Lee,  President  of  the  Mary- 
land Council,  to  Governour  Penn, 
4,     Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at  Ligonier,  to  Gov- 
ernour Penn.      Large  body  of  Virginians  m 
motion.     Colonel   Henry  Lewis  ordered  to 
Kenhawa;    Major   M' Donald  to  Wheeling; 
Cresap.  and  three  others,  to  raise  Ranging 
Companies,       ''"''', 
8,     Letter  from  .^neas  Mackay,  Joseph  Spear,  and 
Devereux   Smith,    at   Pittsburgh,   to  Joseph 
Shippen,  Junior.     Captain  White  Eyes  has 
returned,  with  assurances  of  friendship  from 
the   Shawanese,  Delawares,  Wyandots,   and 
Cherokees.     Dr.  Connolly  continues  his  au- 
thority.    The  persons  of  the  Magistrates  are 
daily  insulted,  their  property  forcibly  taken, 
and  their  lives  threatened.     Various  instances 
of  his  outrages,  ....         -     547 

12,     Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at  Hanna's  Town, 

to  Governour  Penn, 548 

17,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair,  at  Ligonier,  to 
Governour  Penn.  Virginians  determined  to 
put  a  stop  to  the  Indian  Trade  with  Virginia. 
Connolly  and  two  others  have  an  exclusive 
privilege  to  carry  it  on,  on  the  Frontiers  of 
Virginia.  The  laying  out  of  a  new  Town 
proposed.  ...... 


547 


549 


534 


July 
14, 

14, 

15, 

15, 

15, 

15, 

15, 


15, 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Province  of 
Georgia  called,  to  be  held  at  the  Liberty  Pole, 
at  Savannah,  on  the  27th,  .         .         - 

Chiefs  of  the  Six  Nations  on  their  way  to  hold  a 
Congress  with  Sir  William  Johnson, 

Meeting  of  the  loyal  and  patriotick  People  of  the 
County  of  Henrico,  in  Virginia, 


^""••"j  —  *- --, -, , 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  the  County  of  Mid- 
dlesex, in  Virginia, 


Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  County  of  Din 
widdie,  in  Virginia,     .         -         .         - 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
County  of  Middlesex,  in  New-Jersey,     . 

Delegates  to  the  General  Congress  of  Commis- 
sioners of  the  English  American  Colonies,  ap- 
pointed by  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 
ConiKclicut,        ...... 

Three  of  the  Delegates  having  resigned,  others 
appointed  on  the  3d  August,  ( Note,) 

Proclamation  by  General  Gage.  Deserters  who 
return  by  the  10th  of  August,  to  be  pardoned  ; 
on  failure  of  so  doing,  to  expect  no  mercy, 


549 


550 


550 


551 


-     552 


55J 


.     554 


554 


555 


LIII 

1774. 

July   Provincial  Meeting  of  Deputies,  chosen  by  the 

15,  several  Counties  in  Pennsylvania,  held  at  Phil- 
adelphia, July  15,  and  continued,  by  adjourn- 
ments, to  the  21st, 

List  of  the  Members,       ..... 

Letters  from  Boston,  of  May  13th,  read  and  con- 
sidered,    .--..-- 

Alleg-iance  to  the  King  of  Great  Britain  acknow- 
ledged,     ------- 

Unconstitutional  Independence  on  the  parent  state 
is  abhorrent  to  our  principles ;  and  our  desire 
is,  that  harmony  may  be  restored. 

Inhabitants  of  the  Colonics  entitled  to  the  same 
rights  that  British  born  Subjects  are. 

The  power  assumed  by  Parliament  to  bind  the 
Colonies,  in  all  cases  whatsoever,  imconstitu- 
tional,        -...-. 

The  Acts  of  Parliament  relating  to  Massachu- 
setts, unconstitutional,  oppressive,  and  danger- 
ous :  and  the  People  of  Boston  are  suffering 
in  the  common  cause,  .         .         .         - 

A  Congress  should  immediately  assemble,  to 
form  a  general  plan  of  conduct  for  all  the 
Colonies,  -..-.. 

Suspension  of  Trade  will  be  agreed  to  by  this 
Province  ;  but  a  statement  of  Grievances  and 
claim  for  Redress,  in  the  first  place,  would  be 
preferred,  ...... 

If  any  proceedings  of  Parliament  shall,  in  the 
opinion  of  the  Congress,  render  other  steps 
necessary,  this  Province  will  adopt  and  carry 
them  into  execution,  .         -         -         . 

Venders  of  Merchandise  ought  not  to  take  advan- 
tage of  a  Non- Importation ;  but  sell  for  the 
same  prices  as  heretofore,     -         -         -         - 

People  of  this  Province  will  break  03*311  dealing 
of  any  kind  with  any  Colony  that  shall  not 
adopt  such  general  plan  as  may  be  agreed  to 
in  Congress,      --...- 

Subscriptions  for  the  distressed   Inhabitants  of 
Boston  to  be  set  on  foot  throughout  the  Prov- 
ince, ....... 

Thanks  to  Mr.  Dickinson,       -         .         .         - 

Mr.  Dickinson's  Reply,  (Note,)        -         -         - 

Instructions  from  the  Convention  to  the  Repre- 
sentatives in  Assembly,        -         -         .         - 

Argumentative  part  of  the  Instructions, 

16,  Meeting  of  a  respectable  body  of  the  Freeholders 

and  other  Inhabitants  of  the  County  of  Surry, 

in  Virginia, 

16,  Contributions  from  Maryland,  for  the  relief  of 
Boston, -         - 

1 5,  Meeting  of  a  number  of  Freeholders  and  Inhabit- 

ants of  the  County  of  Sussex,  in  New-Jersey, 

16,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Boston  to  the  Com- 

mittee of  Baltimore,  -         -         .         . 

1 8,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  York  County,  in  Virginia,        -         -         - 

IS,  General  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other 
Inhabitants  of  the  County  of  Fairfax,  in  Vir- 
ginia,       ....... 

PENNSYLVANIA  ASSEMBLY. 

July  Assembly,  convened  by  the  Governour,  met  this 

18,  day, - 

Message  from  the  Governour.      State  of  Indian 

affairs,       -.-.... 

19,  Committee   of    Correspondence   lay  before  the 

House     Letters     from     Massachusetts    Bay, 

Rhode-Island,  and  Virginia,       .         .         - 
Letters  to  be  considered  on  the  21st, 
The  Convention  now  sitting,  may  be  admitted,  to 

hear  the  debates  of  the  House,  on  that  day,     - 
Petition  from  Northumberland  County, 
Ninth  Resolution  of  the  Convention  laid  before 

the  House,  ------ 

Governour's  Message  considered,     .         -         - 

20,  Letters  from    Benjamin    Franklin,    with   some 

papers  on  publick  affairs,  communicated  to  the 
House  by  the  Speaker,         -         ..        -         - 
Payment  of  the  Rangers  raised  by  the  Magis- 
trates of  Westmoreland  County,  authorized, 

21,  The  Convention  waited  on  the  House,  and  sub- 

mitted their  Resolves  and  Instructions, 

22,  Letters  from  Massachusetts  Bay,  Rhode- Island, 

and  Virginia,  considered  in  Committee  of  the 
Whole, 


CONTENTS. 


555 
555 

555 

555 

555 
556 

-     556 
550 


556 

556 
556 

557 


557 
557 
557 

558 
564 


593 
593 
594 
594 
595 

597 

602 
602 


603 
604 

604 
604 

605 
605 


605 
605 
606 

606 


1774. 

July 

22, 


21, 


23, 


July 
19, 
19, 


19, 

19, 

20. 
20. 


20, 


21, 


21, 
21, 


Resolution,  that  there  is  an  absolute  necessity  for 
a  General  Congress,  to  consult  together  on  the 
state  of  the  Colonies,  unanimously  adopted. 

Delegates  to  the  Congress  appointed. 

Committee  to  prepare  Instructions  for  the  Dele- 
gates,       -...--- 

Paper  signed  "  a  Freeman,"  handed  about  among 
the  Members  of  the  House  on  the  21st,  against 
the  appointment  and  proceedings  of  the  Con- 
vention, (Note,)  .         .        .        - 

Letter  received  from  Major  Hamilton,  command 
ing  officer  of  the  Barracks,  -        .        - 

Committee  to  examine  the  Barracks, 

Instructions  to  the  Delegates  appointed  to  attend 
the  Congress,     --.--. 

Letter  to  the  Speakers  of  the  several  Assemblies 
of  the  Colonies,  .         .         .        .        . 

Answer  to  the  Governour's  Message, 

Adjourned  to  Monday,  the  19th  September, 


LIV 


606 
607 

607 


-    607 

607 
608 

608 

609 
609 
610 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Resolutions  adopted  and  published  by  the  New- 
York  Committee,        -         -         -         -         -     315 

Meeting  of  a  majority  of  the  Committees  from 
the  several  Townships  in  the  County  of  Mon- 
mouth, of  the  Colony  of  New- Jersey,  -     610 

Address  of  the  Justices  of  the  County  of  Suffolk, 
in  Massachusetts,  to  Governour  Gage,  -     613 

The  Governour's  Answer,       -         -         -         -     613 

Address  of  the  Freeholders  and  Tradesmen  of 
Easton,  in  the  County  of  Bristol,  to  Govern- 
our Gage,  ------    613 

The  Governour's  Answer,       -         -         -         -     614 

Letter  from  a  Gentleman  in  Bristol,  England,  to 
his  friend  in  Philadelphia.  Publick  opinion 
in  England  strong  against  America.  No- 
thing but  firmness  on  the  part  of  the  Ameri- 
cans will  ensure  them  the  victory,         -         -     614 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  Merchants  have  not  repeated 
their  attempts  to  comply  with  the  Port  Bill, 
with  the  spirit  he  hopal  for.  Some  disaffected 
persons  in  Charlestown,  have  sent  some  Rice 
for  the  support  of  Boston ;  and  a  few  Sheep 
have  been  sent  from  some  other  places.  When 
the  Congress  assembles,  the  Boston  Faction  .  . 
will  probably  pay  the  other  Colonies  the  com- 
pliment of  taking  their  advice.  The  virulent 
party  at  New- York  is  routed.  Philadelphia 
is  moderate.  The  Fast  Day  appointed  by  the 
Faction  was  kept  as  generally  in  Boston,  as  if 
it  had  been  appointed  by  authority,      -         -     615 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Hanover  County, 
Virginia,  -....-     615 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  Stafford  County,  Virginia,        -         -         -     617 

General  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Dis- 
trict of  Wilmington,  in  the  Province  of  North 
Carolina,  -         -         -         -         -         -618 

Circular  Letter  from  the  Wilmington  Committee 
to  the  Freeholders  of  the  several  Counties  of 
the  Province  of  North  Carolina,  -         -     619 

The  British  American,  No.  8,  -         -         -     620 

General  Meeting  of  the  Committees  of  the  several 
Counties  in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  at 
New-Brunswick,  on  the  21st,  22d,  and  23d 
days  of  July,      -.-..-     624 

The  Inhabitants  of  New-Jersey  are  firm  and 
unshaken  in  their  loyalty  to  the  King,  and 
detest  all  thoughts  of  an  Independence  on  the 
Crown,  --....     624 

The  claim  of  the  Parliament  to  make  Laws  to 
bind  the  King's  American  Subjects  in  all  cases 
whatsoever,  unconstitutional,  and  oppressive, 
and  we  are  bound  to  oppose  it  by  all  constitu- 
tional means,      ------     624 

The  late  Acts  of  Parliament  relative  to  Massa- 
chusetts, subversive  of  the  rights  of  his  Ma- 
jesty's American  Subjects,  -         .        -     624 

The  most  eligible  method  to  procure  a  redress  of 
Grievances,  is  to  appoint  a  Congress  from  all 
the  Colonies,  empowered  to  pledge,  each  to  the 
rest,  the  honour  and  faith  of  their  constituents, 
inviolably  to  adhere  to  the  determinations  of  the 
Congress,  --..--     624 

General  Non- Importation  and  Non-Exportation 
Agreement  recommended,  ...     624 


LV 

1774. 

July 

21. 


21, 

21, 
23, 

23, 


20, 
20, 

5, 


10. 


July 
25, 


25. 
25, 
26, 

26, 

26, 

27, 
27, 

27, 
27, 
27, 


CONTENTS. 


LVI 


27. 


Collections  to  be  made  throughout  the  Proriuce, 
for  relief  of  Boston,  ...         -     625 

Delegates  to  the  General  Continental  Congress 
appointed,  and  instructed,     ...         -     626 

Proclamation  by  Governour  Gage,  for  the  en- 
couragement of  Pirty  and  Virtue,  and  for  pre- 
venting and  punishing  Vice,  Profanity,  and 
Inamoraliiy,       ------     625 

Address  to  the  worthy  Inhabitants  of  the  Town 
of  Boston,         -..---    626 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Philadel- 
piiia.  The  storm  against  Doctor  Franklin 
much  abated.  Opinions  in  England  on  the 
late  measures  against  America.  Many  per- 
sons in  favour  of  the  Colonies.  Granville 
Sharp  warmly  on  their  side,         ...    G28 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  Governour 
Trumbull.  Encloses  him  affidavits  relating 
to  the  treatment  of  Mr.  Green.  Expects  tlie 
accused  persons  will  be  apprehended  and 
brought  to  trial, 629 

Affidavit  of  Caleb  Scott,  -         -         -         -     629 

Affidavit  of  Francis  Green,     -         -         •         -    630 

Representation  of  Hezekiah  Bissell,  Benjamin 
Lothrop,  Timothy  Liirrabee,  and  Ebenezer 
Backus,  to  Governour  Trumbull,  of  the  treat- 
ment of  Mr.  Green,  -        -        -        -    631 

Letter  from  Governour  Trumbull  to  Governour 
Ghige.  Has  inquired  into  Mr.  Green's  com- 
plaint and  finds  others  put  a  very  different  face 
upon  the  transaction.  Full  provision  is  made 
by  Law  for  such  offences,  and  Mr.  Green  may 
obtain  the  satisfaction  his  cause  may  merit,     -   633 

Letter  from  Governour  Sir  James  Wright  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Carolina  in  great  wrath 
about  the  Acts  of  Parliament  relative  to  Mas- 
sachusetts Bay;  and  have  come  to  some  very 
indecent  Resolutions.  There  are  in  Georgia 
some  malecontents  and  Liberty  People,  whose 
conduct  he  cannot  answer  for,       .         -         .     633 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Elizabeth  City,  and 
To\vn  of  Hampton,  in  Virginia,  -         -     634 

Reflections  on  the  measures  proper  to  be  adopted 
by  the  Congress ;  and  suggestions  for  the  con- 
sideration of  the  Delegates,         .        .        -    634 

Town  Meeting  in  Boston.  Circular  Letter  to 
the  Tovms  relative  to  the  Bills  for  vacating 
the  Charter  of  Massachusetts,      -         -         -     637 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  the  County  of 
Albemarle,  in  Virginia,       .         .         -         .     637 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee,  to  the 
Committee  of  Correspondence,  at  Charlesto  wn. 
South  Carolina. 320 

Letter  from  Governour  Grage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth,       638 

General  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Georgia, 
held  in  Savannah,       .         .        -        .         .     638 

Account  of  the  Meeting,  (Note,)     -         .         .     639 

Paper  by  Josiah  Martin,  in  behalf  of  the  Sugar 
Colonies,  (Note,) 639 

Meeting  of  a  very  respectable  body  of  the  Free- 
holders and  other  Inhabitants  of  the  County 
of  Accomack,  in  Virginia,  ...     639 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Princess  Aime,  in  Vir- 
ginia,      - 640 

Letter  received  in  Philadelphia  from  London. 
Resolutions  of  Philadelphia,  Maryland,  and 
Virginia,  esteemed  very  inoffensive,  and  as  the 
mere  ebullitions  of  a  set  of  angry  men.  Mr. 
Hutchinson  is  much  courted  by  the  Adminis- 
tration. Americans,  both  at  Court  and  in  Lon- 
don, daily  ridiculed.  The  Congress  must 
agree  not  to  purchase  or  use  the  Manufac- 
tures of  Great  Britain  until  the  Acts  are  re- 
pealed, as  the  only  means  of  preserving  the 
Liberty  of  the  Coimtry,     -  .         .         -     64 1 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  New-Jersey.  De- 
fence of  the  measures  of  Parliament,  a  denial 
of  the  authority  of  Great  Britain  to  impose  a 
Duty  on  Tea,  absurd.  Cautions  the  People 
against  the  madness  of  some  men,  who  are 
inflaming  their  minds  and  hurrying  them  into 
an  open  rupture  with  the  Mother  Comitry; 
when,  involved  in  the  horrours  of  a  Civil  War 
to  the  ruin  of  their  liberty,  they  may  be  com- 
pelled to  submit  by  force,    ....     Q42 


1774. 

July 

28, 

28, 
22, 


Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  County  of  Buckingham,  in  Vii' 


28, 

28, 
28, 


28, 


28, 
28. 

28, 
28, 
29, 

30, 
30, 


30, 


30, 
31, 


gmia, 


-     643 


AU!^. 


Proclamation  of  the  Governour  of  Pennsylvania, 
for  the  apprehension  of  John  Hinckson  and 
James  Cooper,       -         .         .         - 

Letter  from  Guy  Johnson  to  Governour  Penn. 
Death  of  Sir  William  Johnson.  Has  had  a 
Conference  with  the  Si.x  Nations,  who  will  send 
Deputies  to  the  southward  to  accommodate 
matters,     ....--- 

Account  of  the  death  of  Sir  William  Johnson, 
on  the  11th  instant,  (Note,)  -         -         - 

Governour  Penn  advisinl  by  the  Council  to  write 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  and  inform  him  of 
all  the  late  proceedings  in  Pennsylvania,  by 
the  Committees  and  the  Assembly, 

Letter  from  Boston,  received  in  New- York. — 
Firmness  of  the  People  there.  Encouraged  to 
persevere  from  all  the  Colonies,     -         -         - 

Address  to  the  Gentlemen  of  the  General  Con- 
vention of  Virginia.  Stoppage  of  Trade  with 
Great  Britain  will  not  procure  a  redress  of 
Grievances.  It  is  better  to  throw  aside  all  tem- 
porizing methods.  Let  the  Congress  demand 
a  ratification  of  our  claims  from  the  King  and 
Parliament.  If  denied,  we  shall  be  prepared 
for  the  ahernative.  With  the  Sword  our  fore- 
fathers obtained  their  rights — by  the  Sword  it 
is  our  duty  to  defend  them,  .         .         - 

The  British  American,  No.  9.  If  Great  Britain 
should  attempt  to  enforce  the  legislation  of  Par- 
liament in  America,  the  Americans  must  draw 
their  Swords  in  a  just  cause,  and  rely  on  that 
God  who  assists  the  righteous.  Thomson  Ma- 
son avows  himself  the  author  of  these  Letters, 

Address  to  the  People  of  Pennsylvania.  Rea- 
sons why  the  Tea  should  not  be  paid  for. 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence,  of 
New-Jersey,  to  the  Committee  of  Boston, 

A  Brief  Examination  of  American  Grievances : 
being  the  heads  of  a  Speech  at  the  General 
Meeting  at  Lewestown,  on  Delaware,    - 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  New- York  to  the 
Committee  of  Correspondence  at  Philadel))hia, 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  Mat- 
thew Tilghman,  Chairman  for  Maryland, 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee,  to  the 
Committee  or  Treasurer  of  the  different  Coim- 
ties,  -.---.. 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  The  Resolutions  of  the  Assem- 
bly rather  a  check,  than  an  encouragement,  to 
the  Proceedings  of  the  Convention, 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  The  prevailing  opinion  in  England  is, 
that  the  Colonies  mean  nothing — they  must 
be  divided  by  the  arts  of  the  Administration. 
Their  opposition  should  be  early  and  vigor- 
ous, .-..-. 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Fears  there  will  be  a  want  of  union 
among  the  Colonies.  Without  this,  any  expe- 
dients they  may  adopt  will  avail  little, 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  A  general  suspension  of  Commerce, 
until  our  grievances  are  redressed,  is  the  only 
safe  and  sure  measure.  I'he  Ministry  believe 
that  the  terror  of  their  measures  will  make  all 
America  silent  and  submissive,      .         .         - 

Queries  relatitig  to  the  Resolutions  of  some 
Gentlemen,  styling  themselves  a  Committee 
of  the  City  of  New- York,  (Note,) 

Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Bull  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  An  universal  spirit  of 
jealousy  is  raised  against  Great  Britain.  Ex- 
emption from  Taxation  is  claimed,  but  by  their 
own  Representatives.  This  spirit  of  opposi- 
tion to  Taxation  so  violent  and  universal,  that 
it  will  not  be  soon  or  easily  appeased,  - 
1 ,  Convention  of  the  Representatives  of  the  Freemen 
of  the  Government  of  the  Counties  of  New-Cas- 
tle, Kent,  and  Sussex,  on  Delaware,  meet  at 
New-Castle,       ---... 

List  of  the  Members,      .         -         .         .         , 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  General  Meeting  of  the 
Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the  County  of 
New-Castle,  on  Delaware,  on  the  29th  of  June, 


-     644 


645 
645 


645 


646 


647 


648 
654 


657 


658 


321 


321 


322 


661 


-     661 


661 


662 


318 


663 


663 
663 


664 


LVIt 

1774. 

July 

20. 


CONTENTS. 


LVIII 


1, 
2, 


2. 


3, 


Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Free- 
holders and  other  Inhabitants  of  Kent  County, 
on  Delaware,  on  the  2()th  of  June, 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  General  Meetings  of  the 
Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants  of  the  Coun- 
ty of  Sussex,  on  Delaware,  on  the  23d  of  July, 

Letters  from  the  Committees  of  Correspondence 
of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  the 
Dominion  of  Virg^inia,  the  Colonies  of  Rhode- 
Island,  South  Carolina,  and  Maryland,  read, 

Grievances  of  the  Colonies,  under  the  Acts  of 
Parliament,        ...--. 

Deputies  to  the  Cong-ress  appointed, 

Instructions  to  the  Deputies,  .  .  -  - 
Aug.  1,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Act  of  Parliament  prohibiting  the 
shipping  of  Utensils  used  in  the  manufacture 
of  Cotton,  Wool,  or  Silk,     -         -         -         . 

Condition  of  the  Town  of  Boston,      -         -         . 

Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Golden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  The  Deputies  from  New- 
York,  to  the  General  Congress,  moderate  men. 
Though  great  pains  have  been  taken  in  the 
several  Colonies  to  uiduce  the  People  to  enter 
into  Resolves,  they  have  succeeded  only  in  Suf- 
folk Coimty,       ----- 

Letter  from  Wilmington,  in  North  Corolina,  to  a 
Gentleman  in  Boston.  Subscriptions  for  the 
relief  of  Boston.  At  a  meeting  of  six  Counties 
in  Wilmington,  it  was  unanimously  resolved 
to  assist  Massachusetts  by  every  legal  mea- 
sure, .....-- 

Letter  from  Wilmington,  in  North  Carolina,  to  a 
Gentleman  in  Boston.  Two  thousand  Pounds 
subscribed  for  Boston :  very  considerable  will 
be  contributed  at  Newbem  and  Edenton;  Sub- 
scriptions on  foot  in  every  County.  The  Ves- 
sel, with  a  load  of  Provisions  for  Boston,  goes 
freight  free,  and  the  Master  and  Mariners  navi- 
gate her  without  receiving  one  farthing  wages. 

South  Carolina  Assembly  meet  at  eight  o'clock 
in  the  morning,  .         .         .         .         - 

Ratify  and  confirm  the  Proceedings  of  the  Gene- 
ral Meeting  of  Inhabitants  on  the  6th,  7th,  and 
8th  of  July, 

Message  from  the  Assembly  to  Lieutenant  Gov- 
ernour Bull.  Request  him  to  distribute  among 
the  poor  Settlers.  Arms  and  Ammunition  to 
protect  them  against  the  Indians, 

Assembly  prorogued  by  the  Lieutenant  Govern- 
our at  half  past  eight  o'clock,        -         -         . 

Notice  of  the  Proceedings  of  the  Assembly  at  the 
Session  held  yesterday,         .         -         -         . 

Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Bull  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  The  Assembly  met  pri- 
vately and  punctually  at  eight  yesterday  morn- 
ing. I  immediately  went  fo  the  Council  Cham- 
ber and  prorogued  them  to  September  6,  but 
they  had,  previously,  passed  their  Resolutions, 

Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieuten- 
ant Governour  Colden.  Encloses  an  Order 
in  Council  disallowing  certain  Acts, 

Representation  of  the  Board  of  Trade  to  the 
King,  of  the  12th  of  May,  with  reasons  for  dis- 
allowing certain  Acts  passed  by  the  Assembly 
of  New- York, 

Order  in  Council,  of  the  6th  of  July,  declaring 
the  Acts  void,  and  of  no  efiijct, 


-  664 


665 


666 

667 
667 
667 


668 
669 


-  669 


2, 


3, 
3, 


3, 


COUNCIL  OP  PENNSYLVANIA. 


670 


670 
671 


-     671 


671 


672 


672 


672 


-     672 


673 


-     673 


Aug.  Letters  and  Papers  submitted  to  the  Council,  by 
4,         the  Governour,            .....     (374 
New  Town  to  be  laid  out  at  Kittaning,  for  accom- 
modation of  Traders  and  Inhabitants  of  Pitts- 
burgh,        674 

6,      Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Arthur  St.  Clair,     674 
Message  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Chiefs  and 

Warriors  of  the  Shawanese  Indians,      -         -     675 
Message  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Chiefs  and 
Warriors  of  the  Delaware  Indians,        -         -     676 
July    Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 
22,  Friends  of  Pennsylvania  determined  to  abandon 

Pittsburgh.     Kittaning  most  suitable  place  for 
a  new  Town,      --.-..     677 
13,      Deposition  of  William  Wilson,  a  Trader,  taken 

by  one  of  Connolly's  parties,         ...     (577 
19,     Letter  from  John  Connolly  to  Arthur  St.  Clair, 


1774. 


Complains  of  the  depredations  of  the  Indians. 
Will  no  longer  be  a  dupe  to  their  amicable  pro- 
fessions, but  will  pursue  every  measure  to  offend 

them, 678 

July    Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  John  Connolly. 

22,  Ample  reparation  ought  to  be  made  to  the  In- 
dians, and  an  honest  intercourse  established 
with  them ;  this  would  be  a  more  cheap  and 
easy  manner  of  re-establishing  peace  than  any 
offensive  operations  whatever,       -        .         .     078 

26,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 

Further  account  of  Indian  affairs.  No  pros- 
pect of  accommodation  between  the  Shawa- 
nese and  the  Virginians,      .         .         -        .     679 

24,  Deposition    of    David    Griffey.      Indians  near 

Hanna's  Town, 680 

23,  Speech  of  the  Delawares  to  Mr.  Croghan,  -  680 
Intelligence  from  Captain  White  Eyes,  -  -  681 
Address  from  Mr.  Croghan  to  Captain  White 

Eyes, 681 

Answer  of  Captain  White  Eyes  to  Col.  Croghan,     68 1 

25,  Letter  from  iEneas  Mackay  to  Arthur  St.  Clair,     682 
Aug.%,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 

Favourable  accounts  from  the  Indian  Nations 
about  the  Lakes.  Most  of  them  disposed  to 
continue  in  friendship  with  the  English,  -     682 

25,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 
It  is  impossible  to  tell  what  will  be  the  conse- 
quence of  the  Virginia  operations.  Lord  Dun- 
more  must  soon  see  the  necessity  of  a  peace. 
Goods  seized  by  Connolly's  orders,  and  per- 
sons confined  in  the  common  Guard-House,         683 

27,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 

Mr.  Butler  was  not  only  made  a  prisoner,  but 
treated  with  insult  and  abuse.  I'his  has  been 
done  by  Mr.  Campbell,  Connolly  having  gone 
to  meet  Lord  Dunmore,       -         -         -         -     685 


CORRESPONDENCE,   PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Aug.  Address  to  the  People  of  Virginia.     Urged  to 
4,  unite  their  utmost  endeavours,  by  all  means  in 

their  power,  to  prevent  the  ruin  they  are  threat- 
ened with,  ......     685 

I,  Convention  of  Delegates  from  the  different  Coun- 
ties in  the  Colony  and  Dominion  of  Virginia, 
begun  at  Williamsburg,  on  the  1st  day  of  Au- 
gust, and  continued,  by  adjournments,  to  the 
6th, 686-690 

After  the  first  day  of  November,  will  import  no 
Goods,  Wares,  or  Merchandise,  from  Great 
Britain,  nor  British  Manufactures  from  any 
other  place;  nor  purchase  any  that  may  be 
imported,  ......     637 

Will  neither  import  any  Slave,  nor  purchase  any 
that  may  be  imported  after  the  1st  November       687 

No  Tea  to  be  imported  hereafter  ;  and  that  which 
is  on  hand,  not  permitted  to  be  used,       -         -     687 

No  Tobacco  to  be  exported  after  the  10th  of 
August  next,  unless  American  Grievances  are 
sooner  redressed ;  and  the  Inhabitants  of  the 
Colony  advised  to  refrain  from  the  cultivation 
of  it, 687 

The  breed  of  Sheep  to  be  improved,  and  their 
number  increased,  to  the  utmost  extent,  -     687 

Merchants  are  not  to  take  advantage  of  the  scarci- 
ty of  Goods,  but  to  sell  at  the  present  prices,        688 

No  Merchant  or  Trader  to  be  dealt  with,  after 
the  first  of  November  ne.xt,  who  will  not  sign 
this  Association,  -         -         -         .         .     688 

If  any  person  shall,  after  the  10th  of  August 
next,  export  Tobacco,  contrary  to  this  Asso- 
ciation, he  shall  be  considered  an  approver  of 
American  Grievances,  ....     688 

All  alterations  of  these  Resolutions  that  may  be 
made  by  the  General  Congress,  with  the  con- 
sent of  the  Delegates  for  Virginia,  shall  be 
binding  upon  the  Colony,  ...     688 

The  Inhabitants  of  the  Colony  requested  to  make 
liberal  Contributions  for  the  relief  of  the  dis- 
tressed in  Boston,        .....    688 

Instructions  for  the  Deputies  appointed  to  meet  in 
General  Congress  on  the  part  of  the  Colony  of 
Virginia,  ......     689 

A  Summary  View  of  the  Rights  of  British  Ame- 
rica, set  forth  in  some  Resolutions  intended  for 
the  inspection  of  the  present  Delegates  of  the 
People  of  Virginia,  now  in  Convention,         -     690 


1774. 

Aug. 

5. 


9. 

9. 

10, 


CONTENTS. 


m> 


10, 


10, 

10, 
10, 

11, 

12, 
12, 

13, 

13, 

13, 

14, 


14, 


16, 


Proclamation  by  Governour  Sir  James  Wright, 
doclaring  the  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of 
Georgia,  proposed  to  be  held  at  Savannah,  on 
the  lOlh  inst,  under  the  pretence  of  consulting 
together  for  redress  of  grievances,  or  imaginary 
grie^-anccs,  unconstitutional,  illegal,  and  pun- 
ishable by  law, 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  the 
Boston  Committee  of  Correspondence, 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Conunittee  to  several 
Counties  of  the  Province,     -         -         -         - 

Resolutions  enterwl  into  at  Savannah,  in  Georgia, 
at  a  General  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the 
Province,  assinibled  to  consider  the  state  of  the 
Colonies  in  America,  .         .         .         - 

His  Majesty's  Subjects  in  America  owe  the  same 
allegiance,  and  are  entitled  to  the  same  rights, 
with  their  ft^Uow-subjects  in  Great  Britain,     - 

As  protection  and  allegiance  are  reciprocal,  the 
Americans  have  an  indisputable  right  to  peti- 
tion the  Throne  on  every  emergency. 

The  Boston  Port  Act  is  unconstitutional. 

The  Act  for  abolishing  the  Charter  of  Massachu- 
setts Bay,  is  subversive  of  American  Rights, 

The  British  Parliament  has  not  the  right  to  Tax 
his  Majesty's  American  Subjects, 

It  is  contrary  to  the  Law  of  the  Land  to  take  any 
person  to  Great  Britain,  to  be  tried  for  an  of- 
fence committfxl  in  any  of  the  Colonies, 

Will  concur  with  the  other  Colonies  in  every 
constitutional  measure  to  obtain  a  redress  of 
Grievances,        ...--- 

Committee  of  Correspondence  appointed. 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Boston. 
The  Ministry,  by  their  emissaries,  will  try  to 
bring  about  disunion  when  the  Congress  meets. 
It  is  not  prudent  to  rely  on  any  support  in 
England ;  the  Colonies  must  depend  on  their 
o\\n»  unanimity  and  steadiness.  Massachusetts 
should  not  enter  into  any  violent  measures 
without  concert  with  other  Colonies,  particu- 
larly Maryland,  Virginia,  and  the  Carolinas, 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
Poughkeepsie  Precinct,  in  Dutchess  County, 
New- York.  Refijse  to  comply  with  the  re- 
quest of  the  New- York  Committee  of  Corres- 
pondence, to  elect  Delegates,  .         .         - 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
Township  of  Rye,  in  West-Chester  Comity, 
New- York, 

Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Charles  County, 
Maryland.  Tea  shipped  in  the  Mary  and  Jane, 
Captain  George  Chapman,  now  lying  in  St. 
Mary's  River,  to  be  returned  to  London, 

Meeting  of  the  Committee  for  Frederick  County, 
in  Maryland.  Resolutions  in  relation  to  the 
Tea  stripped  in  the  Mary  and  Jane, 

Town  Meeting  at  Providence,  in  Rhode-Island. 
Instructions  to  the  Deputies  from  the  Town  in 
the  General  Assembly,         .... 

Comicil  of  North  Carolina.  Address  of  Govern- 
our Martin.  Considers  it  his  duty  to  advise 
with  the  Coimcil  on  the  measures  to  be  taken 
to  prevent  the  assembhesof  the  People, 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Martin.  Requires 
all  persons,  as  far  as  in  them  lies,  to  prevent  the 
meeting  of  certain  Deputies,  appointed  to  be 
held  at  Newbern,  on  the  '25th,       ... 

Letter  from  Colonel  William  Preston,  atFincastle, 
in  Virginia.  Incursions  of  the  Indians.  A 
number  of  the  Inhabitants  on  the  Frontiers 
killed, 

Letter  from  Governour  Sir  James  Wright  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Two  meetings  of  the  Li- 
berty Folks  have  been  held  in  Savannah.  Ho 
will  transmit  all  the  particulars, 

Letti'r  from  a  Gentleman,  in  London,  to  his  Cor- 
respondent  in  Williamsburg.  Policy  of  the 
Ministry  to  attack  one  Colony  at  a  time.  Ame- 
rica has  no  friends  in  Great  Britain.  Nothing 
but  an  Association  strictly  observed  and  enfor- 
ced, to  stop  Exports  and  Imports,  will  procure 
a  repeal  of  the  Acts,    -         .         .         -         . 

John  Hancock,  Colonel  of  the  Company  of  Cadets, 
having  been  dismissed  by  Governour  Gage, 
tlie  Company  agreed  to  return  their  Standard 
to  the  Governour  and  disband  themselves, 

Letter  from  Silas  Deane  to  Governour  Trumbull, 


699 
323 
323 

700 


701 

702 
703 

-  703 
704 
705 

705 

70G 

707 

708 


1774. 

Aug. 

14, 

18, 


15, 
Oct. 

13. 

Nov.  3, 


Oct.  1, 


700 

Nor. 
29, 
Dec.  6 

700 
700 

Aug. 
17, 

700 
700 

18, 

700 

18, 

701 
701 

20, 

20, 


708 


709 
710 


20, 

20, 

22, 

22, 
23, 


23, 
25, 

24, 


-    711 

712 
713 
714 

714 
715 

715 


716 
716 

717 

-    718 

722 

724 

.     724 


The  Rev.  Samuel  Peters  of  Hebron,  Connecticut. 
Account  of  an  attack  on  him  by  the  Sons  of 
Liberty,  ..... 

Statement  of  Mr.  Peters's  affair,  by  the  Bolton 
Committee,         ...... 

Resolves  drawn  up  by  Mr.  Peters, 

Mr.  Peters's  Declaration,  .         .         .        - 

Letter  from  Thaddeus  Burr,  in  Boston,  to  Govern- 
our Trumbull,  ..... 

Further  account  of  Mr.  Peters,         "        ."         ' 

Letter  from  the  Reverend  Samuel  Peters,  in  Bos- 
ton, to  his  mother,  in  Hebron,        "        ."         " 

Letter  from  the  Reverend  Samuel  Peters,  in  Bos- 
ton, to  the  Reverend  Doctor  Auclimuty,  at 
New- York, 

Saul  Aylford  and  others,  to  Governour  Trumbull, 
on  Mr.  Peters's  affair,  .... 

Hezekiah  Huntington  and  others,  to  Governour 
Trumbull,  on  Mr.  Peters's  affair, 

Address  to  the  People  of  Pennsylvania.  The 
opposition  in  the  Colonies  to  the  measures  of 
Parliament  condemned.  The  principal  diffi- 
culties have  been  caused  by  the  influence  of  the 
Smuggling  interest  in  the  Colonies, 

Letter  from  a  Gentleman,  at  Red  Stone,  to  Wil- 
liamsburg. Wagatomica  and  five  other  Shaw- 
anese  Towns  on  the  Muskingum,  destroyed  in 
July,  by  four  hundred  Virginia  Troops,  under 
the  command  of  Major  M'Donald, 

Courts  at  Great  Barrington  prevented  from  pro- 
ceeding with  business,  .         .         .         - 

Letter  from  Matthew  Griswold  to  Governour 
Trumbull.  Account  of  an  attack  on  Mr.  In- 
gersoU,  of  Great  Barrington, 

Letter  from  Josiah  Quincy,  Jun.,  to  John  Dick- 
inson. Defends  Massachusetts  on  the  charge 
of  breaking  the  line  of  opposition.  At  the  re- 
quest  of  many  warm  friends  to  the  country,  he 
will  soon  embark  for  England,  in  the  hope  that 
he  may  do  some  good  the  ensuing  Winter,  at 
the  Court  of  Great  Britain,  ... 

Letter  from  John  Dickinson  to  Arthur  Lee.  The 
Colonists  now  know  what  is  designed  against 
them.  All  classes  arc  united  in  sentiment.  The 
People  in  general  look  forward  to  extremes 
with  resolution,  .         .         -         .         - 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
Borough  Town  of  West-Chester,  in  New. 
York,        -         -         -         -         -         -         - 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Norfolk,  Virginia, 
on  information  received  that  nine  chests  of  Tea 
were  imported  in  the  Mary  and  Jane, 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 
Boston,  to  the  Committee  for  New- Jersey, 

Address  to  the  inhabitants  of  New-Jersey.  This 
Country  was  settled  for  the  sole  purpose  of 
Trade ;  and  an  absolute  submission  to  the  Laws 
of  the  Mother  Country  was  one  of  the  terms 
under  which  our  forefathers  settled.  Under 
these  terms  they  lived  and  prospered;  and  we 
have  grown  rich  and  lived  happily.  Should 
the  Congress  listen  to  the  folly  of  the  times, 
and  think  the  Colonies  were  not  planted  nor 
protected  for  the  extension  of  Commerce,  but 
for  a  new  Empire,  then  will  our  Country  be- 
come a  scene  of  blood  and  distraction;  we  can 
have  no  recourse  but  in  Arms,     ... 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Gage,  to  prohibit  all 
persons  from  attending  a  Town  Meeting  at 
Salem,  on  the  2.5th, 

Town  Melting  at  Salem.  Governour  Gage  or- 
ders the  Meeting  to  be  dispersed,  and  brings 
Troops  to  the  Town.  Members  of  the  Com- 
mittee of  Correspondence  arrested,  for  calling 
the  Meeting  without  the  permission  of  the  Gov- 
ernour,          . 

Letter  from  Governour  Sir  James  Wright  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Every  thing  was  done 
that  could  be  thought  of  to  frustrate  the  at. 
tempt  of  the  Liberty  People  in  Georgia,  but 
could  not  totally  prevent  it.  If  the  meetings 
are  suffered,  there  will  be  nothing  but  cabals 
and  combinations  in  the  Province.  The  Ex- 
ecutive power  is  too  weak  to  rectify  such 
abuses.  Prosecutions  would  only  be  laughed 
at.  No  Grand  Jury  would  find  a  Bill  of  In. 
dictment  ;  and  persons  attempting  it  would, 
probably,  be  insulted  and  abused,  -         .731 


725 

726 

726 

727 
728 


728 
729 


7,30 


Lxr 

1774. 
Aug. 

25, 


24, 


25, 


CONTENTS. 


24, 


25, 


26, 


Abijah  Willard,  one  of  the  Mandamus  Counsel- 
lors for  Massachusetts,  compelled  to  resign,     -     731 

List  of  the  Mandamus  Counsellors  appointed  by 
the  King,  (Note,)        -         -         -         -         -     731 

Letter  from  Taunton,  in  Massachusetts.  Daniel 
Leonard,  a  Mandamus  Counsellor,  fled  to 
avoid  the  friendly  cautions  of  his  incensed 
neighbours,        ......     732 

Letter  from  Taunton,  in  Massachusetts.  Two  or 
three  thousand  person*  will  be  assemblixl  to- 
morrow to  request  Colonel  Gilbert  not  to  ac- 
cept the  office  of  High  Sheriff,  under  the  new 
Act ;  and  to  desire  Brigadier  Ruggles,  a  Man- 
damus Counsellor,  to  quit  the  Coimty  imme- 
diately. It  is  more  dangerous  being  a  Tory 
here  than  in  Boston,  -         -         -         -     732 

Proceedings  of  the  first  Provincial  Convention  of 
North  Carolina,  held  at  Newbern,  -     733-737 

List  of  the  Delegates  to  the  Convention,  -     733 

Letters  from  the  Committees  in  the  other  Colo- 
nies, with  the  Answers,  presented  by  Mr. 
Hewes,  and  considered  by  the  Convention,     -     733 

Three  Delegates  to  General  Congress  to  be  ap- 
pointed,    -------     733 

Allegiance  is  due  to  the  King  of  Great  Britain, 
as  the  rightful  Sovereign  of  this  Province,      -     734 

We  claim  no  more  than  the  rights  of  English- 
men, and  it  is  our  duty  to  maintain  those 
rights, 734 

To  be  taxed  without  our  own  consent,  is  a  gross 
violation  of  the  Grand  Charter  of  our  Liber- 
ties,   734 

As  the  British  Subjects  in  North  America  cannot 
be  represented  in  Parliament,  any  Act  of  Par- 
liament to  Tax  them  is  illegal,     -         -         -     734 

Duties  imposed  by  Act  of  Parliament  for  raising 
a  Revenue,  illegal  and  oppressive,  -         -     734 

The  cause  in  which  the  Inhabitants  of  Massa- 
chusetts now  suffer,  is  the  cause  of  every  honest 
American,  -...--    734 

The  Boston  Port  Act  is  a  cruel  infringement  of 
the  rights  and  privileges  of  the  People  of  Bos- 
ton,   734 

The  Act  of  Parliament  for  regulating  the  Police 
of  Massachusetts,  is  an  infringement  of  the 
Charter  of  that  Province,  .         -         .     735 

Trial  by  Juries  of  the  vicinity,  is  the  only  lawful 
Inquest  that  can  pass  upon  the  life  of  a  British 
Subject, 735 

No  British  or  East  India  Goods  permitted  to  be 
imported  after  the  first  of  January,  1775.  No 
Slaves  to  be  imported  after  the  first  of  Novem- 
ber next ;  and  no  East  India  Tea  to  be  used 
after  the  10th  of  September  next,  -         -     735 

No  Tobacco,  Pitch,  Tar,  Turpentine,  or  any 
other  article,  to  be  exported  to  Great  Britain, 
after  the  first  of  October,  1775,  unless  Ameri- 
can Grievances  are  redressed  before  that  time,     735 

Venders  of  Merchandise  are  not  to  raise  the 
prices  of  their  Goods  in  consequence  of  their 
Resolves  for  Non-Importation,      -         -         .     735 

The  People  of  North  Carolina  will  break  off  all 
Trade  with  any  Colony  on  the  Continent, 
which  shall  refuse  to  adopt  and  carry  into  ex- 
ecution such  general  plan  as  may  be  agreed 
to  in  the  Continental  Congress,     -         -         -,.  735 

Deputies  to  the  Congress  appointed,  -         -     735 

The  attempts  made  by  the  Minister  upon  the 
Town  of  Boston,  a  prelude  to  a  general  attack 
upon  the  rights  of  the  other  Colonies,  -     736 

Committees  to  be  appointed  in  the  several  Coun- 
ties, to  see  that  the  Resolutions  of  this  Conven- 
tion are  properly  observed,  -         -         -     73(3 

Instructions  to  the  Deputies  appointed  to  meet  in 
General  Congress  on  the  part  of  North  Caro- 
lina,   736 

Proceedings  signed  by  the  Members  of  the  Con- 
vention,      737 

E.tpressat  Williamsburg,  from  Pittsylvania  Coun- 
ty. Lidian  Intelligence.  Lord  Dunmore,  with 
fifteen  himdr(;d  Men  ;  and  Colonel  Lewis  and 
Colonel  Preston,  with  twelve  hundred,  against 
the  Indians, 737 

Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Govemour 
Penn.  Directs  him  to  desist  from  extending 
the  jurisdiction  of  Pennsylvania  up  to  the  new 
Maryland  line,  during  the  minority  of  the  Heir 
of  Lord  Baltimore,     ,        -        -        .        .    733 


1774. 

May 

16, 


21. 


Sept. 
26, 


Aug. 
26, 


27, 


27, 
27, 


29, 
29, 


27, 
29, 

30, 


31, 
30, 

30, 


30, 


30, 


31, 


LXII 

Letter  from  Govemour  Penn  to  Governour  Eden. 
Mr.  Harford's  Guardians  have  refused  to  give 
any  instructions  on  the  subject  of  the  Boundary 
run  and  marked  by  the  Commissioners;  he 
will,  therefore,  issue  a  Proclamation  himself, 
extending  the  jurisdiction  of  Pennsylvania,     -     738 

Letter  from  Governour  Eden  to  Governour  Penn. 
The  Guardians  of  the  Proprietor  of  Maryland 
having  declined  signing  the  Return  of  the 
Commissioners,  can  do  nothing  in  relation  to  it,     738 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Richard  Lee. 
Has  made  official  notification  of  the  lines  run 
by  Mason  and  Dixon:  and  the  jurisdiction  of 
Pennsylvania  will  be  extended  to  those  lines,       739 

Letter  from  General  Brattle,  at  Cambridge,  to 
General  Giage.  Military  preparations  in  the 
Province.  Minute  Companies.  Medford  Pow- 
der removed  from  the  Arsenal,     -         .         -     739 

Letter  from  Colonel  Adam  Stephen  to  Richard 
Henry  Lee.  Ordered  to  the  Ohio,  by  Lord 
Dunmore,  which  prevents  his  attending  the 
General  Congress.  Procuring  a  supply  of 
Arms  and  Ammunition  of  the  utmost  impor- 
tance.— This  should  be  privately  considered 
by  the  Congress, 739 

Resolutions  adopted  by  the  Inhabitants  of  Pala- 
tine District,  Tryon  County,  New- York,        -     740 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  The  whole  Province  in  commo- 
tion ;  popular  fury  never  greater  than  at  pre- 
sent. In  Worcester  they  keep  no  terms,  and 
openly  threaten  resistance,  -         -         -     741 

An  account  of  the  manner  in  which  the  Donations 
for  the  support  of  the  Poor  of  Boston  has  been 
applitd,     --..--.     743 

Letter  from  Boston.  The  new  Counsellors 
driven  into  Boston.  The  Judges  at  Great 
Barrington  turned  off  the  Bench.  The  Pro- 
testers and  Addressers  to  Mr.  Hutchinson  have 
fled  to  Boston  for  refuge.  The  Province  will 
soon  be  declared  in  open  rebellion,  and  the 
King's  Standard  hoisted,      -         -         -         .     744 

Timothy  Paine,  a  Mandamus  Counsellor,  com- 
pelled to  resign, 745 

Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.  Delegates  to  the  Congress, 
from  New- Hampshire,  elected.  State  of  affairs 
in  the  Province, 745 

Town  Meeting  at  Providence,  in  Rhode-Islandl 
Arms  for  the  County  to  be  made  fit  for  use. 
Providence  ought  not  to  become  an  asylum  for 
persons  who  have  made  themselves  obnoxious 
to  the  people  in  any  other  part  of  America. — 
The  Town  Council  requested  to  remove  and 
eject  all  such  persons,  .         -         -         -     745 

Town  Meeting  at  Providence,  in  Rhode- Island. 
Magistrates  required  to  preserve  the  Peace  of 
the  Town, 747 

County  Court,  at  Springfield,  sign  an  engagement 
not  to  do  any  thing  whatsoever,  under  any  au- 
thority, derived  or  pretended,  by  the  Act  of  Par- 
liament, for  the  better  regulating  the  Govern- 
ment of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,         747 

On  the  meeting  of  the  Superiour  Court  at  Bos- 
ton, Chief  Justice  Peter  Oliver  on  the  Bench, 
the  Jurors  refuse  to  be  sworn,       -         -         -     747 

Reasons  of  the  Grand  Jurors  for  refusing  to  be 
sworn,       ...-.-.     748 

Reasons  of  the  Petit  Jurors  for  refusing  to  be 
sworn,       ..-.-..     749 

Meeting  of  the  Committees  from  every  Town  and 
District,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  and  Prov- 
ince of  Massachusetts  Bay,  -         -         -     750 

Committee  appointed  to  consider  the  Act  for  the 
better  regulating  the  Government  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  Massachusetts  Bay,  ...     7.50 

Report  of  the  Committee,         -         -         .         -     750 

Adopted  by  the  Meeting,  -         -         .        -     752 

Towns  in  the  County  recommended  to  elect  Dele- 
gates to  a  Provincial  Congress,  to  meet  at  Con- 
cord, on  the  second  Tuesday  in  October,        -     752 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  Pennsylvania. — 
Petitions  and  Remonstrances  to  the  King  and 
Parliament  will  have  no  effect.  We  should 
not  implore,  but  demand  our  liberty,       -         -     754 

Address  to  the  Delegates  appointed  to  meet  in 
the  General  Congress,  -         -         .         .     754 

Queries  proposed  to  the  People  of  America,       -    755 


liXin 

1774. 
Sept. 
1, 


CONTENTS. 


LXIV 


1, 
2, 
2, 


7, 
2, 


5, 


759 


761 
762 
763 

763 

764 
764 


S. 


Address  to  the  People  of  America.     Considera- 
tions on — 1st,  A  Petition  to  Parliament,  with 
a  firm  declaration  of  the  rights  of  Americans. 
2d,  A  suspension  of  Trade  with  Great  Britain, 
till  the  Acts  be  repealed.     3d,  A  suspension  of 
all  our  Trade  with  Great  Britain,  Ireland,  and 
the  West  Indiis,  till  the  Acts  be  repealed, ^    -     756 
Letter  from  a  Virginian  to  the  Members  of  Con- 
gress at   Philadelphia.      The  Colonics  have 
advanced  from  one  extravagant  claim  to  ano- 
ther. Their  most  zealous  advocates  are  asham- 
ed to  plead  a  cause  which  all  others  condemn. 
Parliament  has  a  right  to  Tax  the  Colonies, 
and  cannot  depend  upon  the  uncertain  mode  of 
Requisition,        ------ 

Letter  from  Governour  Martin  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.      The  People  of  North  Carolina 
have  followed  the  rest  of  the  Continent  in  ca- 
balling and  forming  Resolutions  upon  the  late 
measures  of  Government      Docs  not  know 
what  the  Committees  have  done,  but  whatever 
measures  may  have  been  taken,  the  combina- 
tion is  assuredly,  at  least,  indecent  and  inglo- 
rious,       -         -        -         -        "         "     .    " 

Powder  taken  from  the  Charlestown  Magazine, 

by  order  of  General  Gage,  .         .         - 

Judge   Danforth    and  Judge    Lee,    Mandamijs 

Counsellors,  compelled  to  resign. 
Colonel  Phips,  the  High  Sheriff  of  the  County, 
gives  a  pledge  not  to  execute  any  precept  un- 
der the  new  Acts  of  Parliament  for  altering 
the  Constitution  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
Lieutenant  Governour,  Thomas  Oliver,  compel- 
led to  resign  his  seat  as  a  Mandamus  Counsel- 
lor,   

Mr.  Oliver's  statement  of  the  circumstances  un- 
der which  he  resigned,        -         -         -         - 

Letter  from  St.  John's  Parish,  in  Georgia.      Ac- 
count of  the  Meeting  at  Savannah,  on  the  10th 
of  August.      Contributions  from  St.   John's 
Parish  for  the  Sufferers  at  Boston,         -         -     766 
Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth.    State  of  the  Colonies  much  changed 
since  Mr.  Hutchinson  left  America.     Several 
of  the  Counsellors  have  been  obliged  to  seek 
protection  under  the  Troops  in  Boston.     Some 
have  been  maltreated;  many  have  resigned. 
He  intended  to  send  Troops  to  Worcester,  to 
protect  the  Superiour   Court  and  the  Coun- 
sellors, but  ascertained  that  no  Court  could 
proceed  on  business  there.      In  Boston  the 
Judges  met,  but  could  get  no  Juries.      The 
Counsellors  were  afraid  to  proceed  to  Salem ; 
he  was,  therefore,  compelled  to  assemble  them 
in  Boston.     Proposes  to  send  to  New- York, 
Philadelphia,  and  Quebeck,  for  the  Troops 
there.     Civil  Government  is  near  its  end. — 
He  will  avoid  any  bloody  crisis  as  long  as 
possible,  ------     767 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart 

mouth, 769 

Letter  from  a  Member  of  Parliament  to  Colonel 

Charles  Lee,  .--...  769 
Letter  from  a  Gentleman,  in  London,  to  his  Cor- 
resjwndent  in  New- York.  Disputes  of  the 
New- York  Committee  published  in  all  the 
London  papers,  and  have  been  disadvantageous 
to  tlie  cause  of  the  Colonies.  The  Ministry 
are  waiting  anxiously  to  hear  the  result  of  the 
Congress;  they  still  expect  the  Colonies  will 

beg  for  mercy, 771 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Corrospondcnt  in  Bos- 
ton. The  measures  of  the  Colonies  should  be 
calm  and  temperate.  None  of  their  Resolves 
should  contain  reflections  on  Great  Britain. — 
The  East  India  Company  should  be  indemni- 
fied by  the  Bostonians,  and  submission  made 
for  tlie  insult  offiTcd  to  Govemmrnt,  -  -  772 
Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. The  Congress  met  this  morning. 
The  detcnnination  to  oppose  the  Boston  Acts, 
and  the  power  of  Parliament  to  Tax  America, 
universal  throughout  the  Colonies ;  there  is, 
however,  great  diversity  of  opinions  as  to  the 
proper  modes  of  opposition,  -  .  .  773 
Rpport  of  an  attack  on  Boston,  by  the  Men-of- 
War  and  Troops,  on  the  2d,  received  in  New- 
York  by  express, 325 


1774. 

Sept. 

7, 


8, 


8, 


5, 


C, 
9, 


10, 
10, 


9, 
15, 
10, 


11, 

7, 

12, 


13, 


Letter  from  Georgia  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Those  in  favour  of  an  immediate  Non- 
Importation  Agreement  there,  are  far  in  the 
minority.  As  the  Colony  is  situated,  it  would 
be  highly  ungenerous  for  Georgia  to  meddle 
with  the  disputes  in  which  the  rest  of  the  Col- 
onies are  engaged,  -----  773 
Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Colden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  The  populace  are  now 
directed  by  men  ofoproperty,  and  the  former 
demagogues  have  lost  their  influence.  Men 
now  speak  in  favour  of  Government  with 
greater  freedom  than  for  years  past,  -  -  773 
Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Govern- 
our Penn.  The  appointment  of  Deputies,  by 
the  different  Colonies,  to  meet  in  General  Con- 
gress, has  given  the  King  great  concern.  An 
humble  representation  to  the  King  from  each 
Colony  would  have  greater  weight  than  one 

from  the  Congress, 774 

Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dunmore.      E.xpresses  the  King-'s  dissatis- 
faction at  the  ill  treatment  of  the  Indians  on 
the  Ohio  by  the  People  of  Virginia,  and  of  the 
proceedings  of  Connolly,  under  a  commission 
from  the  Government  of  Virginia,  -         -     774 

The  County   Courts,  in  Virginia,   will  do   no 
business  previous  to  a  Session  of  the  General 
Assembly.      At  the  next  General  Court  there 
will  be  no  Trials,  except  in  Criminal  Cases,  -     775 
The  Selectmen  of  Boston  inform  General  Gage 
of  the  alarm  of  the  People  at  his  preparing  to 
erect  a  Fortification  on  the  Neck,  -         -     775 

Address  of  the  Selectmen  of  Boston  to  General 
Gage,   on  his  fortifying  the  entrance  to  the 
Town,  and  the  abuse  and  assaulting  of  the  Peo- 
ple passing  in  and  out  of  the  Town,  by  the 
Guards,    -------      775 

Answer  of  the  Governour,  -  -  -  .  775 
Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Dele- 
gates of  every  Town  and  District  in  the 
County  of  Suffolk,  in  Massachusetts,  -  -  776 
Committee  appointed  by  the  Delegates  in  Suffolk 
County,  to  wait  on  Governour  Gage,  and  in- 
form him  of  the  alarm  of  the  People  at  the 
Fortifications  making  on  Boston  Neck,  -     779 

Address  of  the  Committee  to  Governour  Gage,       779 
Answer  of  the  Governour  to  the  Committee,      -     779 
The  Answer  of  the  Governour  not  satisfactory. 
Another  Address  unanimously  voted  to  his  Ex- 
cellency, ...--.     780 
The  Governour  declined  receiving  the  second 

Address, 781 

Thanks  to  the  Merchants  of  New- York  for  re- 
refusing  to  let  their  Vessels  transport  Troops 
and  Ammunition  to  Boston,  -         .         -     782 

Thanks  to  Mechanicks  of  New- York,  for  refus- 
ing to  make  Chests  for  transportation  of  Arms, 
or  to  contract  for  building  Barracks  at  Boston,  782 
Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieutenant 
Governour  Colden.  The  Contraband  Trade 
between  New- York  and  Holland  deserves  his 
particular  attention.  The  number  of  Vessels 
from  Holland  for  that  Province  is  evidence  of 
the  extent  of  that  illicit  Commerce;  which  is 
now  particularly  alarming,  in  consequence  of 
the  large  quantities  of  Gunpowder  shipped 
there  for  New- York,  .         .         -         -     782 

Letter  from  Israel  Putnam  to  Captain  Trumbull. 
Tea  arrivetl  at  Salem,  ...         -     783 

Letter  from  William  Cooper  to  Israel  Putnam, 
Chairman  of  the  Committee  of  Correspondence 
for  Brooklyn,  in  Connecticut,  -  -  -  783 
Letter  from  William  Cooper,  in  Boston,  to  a 
Gentleman  in  New- York.  Explaining  the 
manner  in  which  the  Donations  made  for  the 
Poor  of  Boston  are  applied,  .         .         -     784 

Committee  appointed  by  the  Town  of  Boston  to 
receive  the  Etenations  and  employ  the  Poor 
Sufferers  by  the  Port  Bill,  -         -         -     785 

Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.  Proceedings  at  Portsmouth, 
in  New-Hampshire  on  the  arrival  of  thirty 
chests  of  Tea  there,  on  the  8th  inst.  Vessel 
sailed  with  the  Tea  for  Halifax,  on  the  1 1th. 
I'hough  this  Province  has  so  far  been  moderate, 
yet  the  union  of  the  Colonies,  in  sentiment,  is 
not  divided  or  lost  in  New-Hampshire,  -     736 


LXV 

1774. 

Sept. 

14, 


14, 


CONTENTS. 


LXVI 


15, 
15, 

15, 
17, 
17, 

17, 

19, 

19, 


Sept. 
19, 

20, 

21, 
26. 


28, 
29, 


Sept. 
20. 


21. 

21, 
21. 


Letter  from  Fredericksburg,  in  Virginia.  Fur- 
ther Indian  Intelligence.  Liberal  contribu- 
tions made  in  Fredericksburg,  for  relief  of  the 
Poor  in  Boston,  .         -         .         -         . 

Letter  from  Joseph  Spencer  to  Grovernour  Trum- 
bull. Doctor  Beebe,  a  Tory,  tarred  and 
feathered  by  the  friends  of  Liberty,  in  East 
Haddam,  has  applied  to  him  for  a  surety  of  the 
peace  against  some  of  those  concerned  in  it. — 
He  has  declined,  and  asks  the  Governour's  ad- 
vice on  the  subject.  He  believes  if  one  should 
be  granted  it  would  not  be  executed  to  advan 
tage, 

An  Army  of  Observation  for  the  Colonies  pro- 
posed in  Connecticut,  .         .         .         . 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  Delegates 
from  the  Towns  in  the  Counties  of  Hartford, 
New- London,  and  Windham,  and  a  part  of  the 
County  of  Litchfield,  in  Connecticut, 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Penn,  establishing 
the  Lines  of  Jurisdiction  between  the  Prov- 
ince of  Maryland  and  the  Province  of  Peim- 
sylvania,  and  Counties  of  NeAV-Castle,  Kent, 
and  Sussex,  on  Delaware,  ... 

Proclamation  of  Lord  Dunmore,  requiring  all  his 
Majesty's  Subjects,  west  of  Laurel  Hill,  to  pay 
entire  obedience  to  the  Laws  of  Virginia,  and 
forbidding  the  exercise  of  any  authority  there, 
by  the  Province  of  Pennsylvania, 

General  Carleton  arrived  at  Q.uebeck, 

Address  of  the  Clergy  to  Guy  Carleton,  Govern- 
our of  Gluebeck,         ..... 

Address  of  his  Majesty's  Subjects,  in  the  City  of 
Quebeck,  to  Governour  Carleton, 

Letter  from  Caesar  Rodney  to  Captain  Thomas 
Rodney.  Action  of  the  Congress  on  the  Re- 
solves of  Suffolk  County,  Massachusetts, 

Letter  from  Samuel  Adams  to  Dr.  Chauncy. 
The  Suffolk  County  Resolves  read  in  Con- 
gress with  great  applause.  America  will  sus- 
tain Boston  to  the  utmost,  ... 

Letter  from  Caesar  Rodney  to  Captain  Thomas 
Rodney.  On  the  late  false  report  of  the  attack 
upon  the  Town  of  Boston,  by  the  British  Ships 
in  the  Harbour,  fifty  thousand  Men,  from  Con- 
necticut and  Massachusetts,  well  armed,  were 
on  the  march  for  the  relief  of  the  Town, 


PENNSYLVANIA  ASSEMBLY. 

The  Assembly  met,  pursuant  to  their  adjourn- 
ment, on  the  23d  of  July,     .... 

Letter  from  Dr.  Franklin,  dated  London,  May  7, 
laid  before  the  House,  .... 

Governour  has  no  business  to  lay  before  the  House, 

Message  from  the  Governour.  The  Indian  Dis- 
turbances not  yet  at  an  end.  The  Governour 
of  Virginia  is  still  prosecuting  an  Expedition 
against  the  Shawanese.  The  Troops  on  the 
Frontiers  should  be  continued  in  pay. 

One  hundred  Rangers  to  be  kept  in  pay  until  the 
14th  of  October,  ..... 

The  Treasurer  ordered  to  pay  the  Overseers  of 
the  Poor  of  Philadelphia,  one  hundred  Pounds 
for  tlie  support  of  the  French  Neutrals, 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. The  Country  People  are  exercising 
in  Arms,  in  Massachusetts,  Connecticut,  and 
Rhode- Island,  and  threaten  to  attack  the 
Troops  in  Boston,  to  which  place  the  friends 
of  Government  are  daily  resorting  for  proteo 
tion.  The  Commissioners  of  the  Customs 
afraid  to  remain  in  Salem,  have  come  to  Bos- 
ton, where  the  Governour  is  also  obliged  to 
reside,       .---... 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Convention  of  Commit- 
tees for  the  County  of  Worcester,  Massachu- 
setts, held  by  adjournment  on  the  29th  of  Au- 
gust, and  continued,  by  adjournments,  to  the 
ii  1st  of  September,       .... 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  in  Boston.  Instructions 
to  Delegates  in  Provincial  Congress, 

Convention  of  the  several  Towns  of  the  County 
of  Cumberland,  in  Massachusetts, 

Sheriff  of  the  County  required  to  attend  the  Con- 
vention,    --..--- 


787 


-     787 


787 


1774. 

Sept. 

21. 


788 


789 


790 
791 

791 

792 


792 


793 


793 


794 

794 
794 


794 
794 


795 


795 


-  795 
798 
798 
799 


He  subscribes  a  Declaration  that  he  has  not  acted 
under  the  late  Acts  of  Parliament ;  and  that        ^ 
he  will  not,  without  the  general  consent  of  the 

County, 799 

Committee  appointed  to  draw  up  the  sentiments 
of  the  Convention,       -        .        .        .        .     799 

22,  Report  presented  by  the  Committee,  and  unani- 
mously accepted,  -        -        .        .     799-802 

24,  Meeting  of  the  Selectmen  and  Committee  of  Cor- 
respondence of  Boston.  Consider  it  inexpe- 
dient for  the  Mechanicks,  or  other  Inhabitants 
of  the  Town,  to  assist  the  Troops,  by  furnish- 
ing them  with  Artificers,  Labourers,  or  mate- 
rials of  any  kind  to  build  Barracks,       -         -     802 

24,  Letter  from  J.  Warren  to  the  Publick,  with  an 
E.xtract  of  a  Letter  from  Samuel  Adams,  dated 
September  9th.  Gentlemen  of  the  establish- 
ed Church  of  England,  among  the  most  reso- 
lute defenders  of  the  rights  of  the  People  of  the 
Continent, 802 

24,  Declaration  of  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
To^\Ti  of  Rye,  in  West- Chester  County,  New- 
York.  They  have  not  been  concerned  in  any 
Resolutions  entered  into  in  regard  to  the  dis- 
putes with  the  Mother  Country.  Disapprove  of 
the  hot  and  furious  proceedings,  in  consequence 
of  the  disputes,  and  declare  they  will  live  and 
die  peaceable  Subjects  of  George  the  Third,  803 
Apology  of  Abraham  Miller  and  others,  for  sign- 
ing the  above  Declaration,  ...  803 
Apology  of  Timothy  Wetmore,  another  sub- 
scriber, (Note,) 803 

Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Mechanicks  of  Bos- 
ton, dated  September  8th,  to  the  Committee  of 
Mechanicks  of  New- York,  -        -        -     803 

24,  Resolutions  of  the  Committee  of  Mechanicks  of 

New- York,  on  receiving  the  foregoing  Letter,     804 

25,  Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 

mouth. The  Carpenters  in  New- York  refuse 
to  come  to  Boston  to  build  the  Barracks,  but 
the  Boston  Artificers  have  undertaken  the 
work.  Nothing  but  e.xtravagances  and  milita- 
ry preparations  heard  of  from  Boston  to  New- 
York.  The  support  Massachusetts  receives 
from  the  other  Colonies,  is  beyond  conception. 
The  disease  is  now  so  universal  that  there  is 
no  knowing  where  to  apply  a  remedy,  -     805 

26,  Accoimt  of  the  transactions  at  a  Meeting  of  the 

Freeholders  of  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in 

England, 805 

Engagement  signed  by  John  Wilkes  and  John 
Glynn,  at  tlie  Middlesex  Meeting,  -        -     806 

26,  Inhabitants  of  Worcester,  in  MassachuseUs,  from 

the  age  of  sixteen  to  seventy,  form  themselves 
into  Military  Companies,  and  choose  Officers,     806 
27      Application  of  Doctor  Warren  to  General  GSage, 
for  information  as  to  his  intentions  in  erecting 
Fortifications  and  purchasing  Military  Stores,     806 
Answer  of  General  Gage  to  Doctor  Warren,     -     806 

27,  Meeting  of  the  Committees  of  Boston  and  the 

neighbouring  Towns.  Resolve  that  any  person 
who  may  supply  the  Troops  at  Boston  with 
any  thing  for  the  annoyance  of  the  Inhabitants, 
shall  be  deemed  an  inveterate  enemy  of  the 
People, 807 

27,  Letter  from  the  Joint  Committees  of  Boston  and 

the  neighbouring  Towns,  to  every  Town  and 
District  in  the  Province,       ....     807 

28,  Letter  from  Colonel  William  Preston,  at  Fincas- 

tle,  in  Virginia.      March  of  Virginia  TrOops 
to  meet  Lord  Dunmore  at  the  Great  Kenhawa.       ; 
Attacks  of  the   Lidians  on  the  White  settle- 
ments,      .......     808 

28,     Letter  from  Maryland  to  a  Gentleman  in  Lon- 
don,   809 

28,      Handbill  published  at  New- York.     Supply  of 

the  British  Troops, 809        ;|i 

28,  Proclamation  by  Governour  Gage.      In  conse- 

quence of  the  disordered  state  of  the  Province, 
will  not  meet  the  General  Court  at  Salem,  on 
the  5th  of  October,  and  discharges  all  persons 
elected  as  Representatives  from  giving  their 
attendance,  ..-.--     809 

29,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 

Boston,  to  the  Continental  Congress.  Account 
of  the  attack  upon  the  House  of  Joseph  Sco«, 
upon  the  discovery  of  his  selling  Cannon  to 
General  Gage, 810 


FocBTH  Series. 


LXVII 

1774. 
Sept. 
29, 

Oct  1, 

1, 

3, 


CONTENTS. 


l.SVIIl 


3, 


3. 


5, 

6, 

7, 

7, 
8. 

8, 


Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  New- York,  con- 
vent by  the  Committee,  at  the  request  of  Jo- 
seph Totten,       -        -        -        "       , "  „    " 
Proclamation  by  the  King,  for  dissolving  the  Par- 
liament, and  calling  another,         "         '.        ' 
(Considerations  on  the   propriety   of  adopting  a 
general  Non-RemitUince,  as  one  of  tli<>  means 
of  obtaining  a  repeal  of  the  Boston  Bills, 
Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth.   The  other  Colonics  have  espoused  the 
cause  of  Massachusetts  with  great  viohnce, 
though  some  arc  more  moderate  than  others. 
The  Congress  is  still  sitting,  but  much  good  is 
not  to  be  expected   from   their  deliberations. 
The  Boston  Artificers  have  refused  to  work  on 
the  Barracks.      A  Provincial  Congress  will 
soon  meet,  when  it  is  supposed  measures  will 
be  taken  for  the  government  of  the  Province, 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. The  Congress  is  siuing,  but  as  they 
have  agreed  to  keep  their  Proceedings  secret, 
he  can  furnish  no  account  but  what  is  found  in 
the  Newspapers,  .... 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  The  opinions  of  the  People  have  be- 
come more  favourable  to  tlie  Americans.  As 
the  issue  of  the  Congress  would  probably  re- 
quire \'igorous  measures,  the  Parliament  has 
been  dissolved,  and  a  new  one  ordered. 

Proceedings  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Livery  of  Lon- 
don, at  Guildhall.  The  Candidates  pledged, 
if  elected  to  Parliament,  to  endeavour  to  pro- 
cure a  repeal  of  the  American  Acts, 

Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Colden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  Several  of  the  Counties 
in  the  Province  refused  to  unite  with  the  New- 
York  Committee  in  sending  Delegates  to  the 
Congress.  Almost  the  whole  of  the  Inhabitants 
of  the  Counties  wish  for  moderate  measures. 
At  a  meeting  held  last  week  the  conduct  of 
the  persons  who  attempted  to  prevent  the  Mer- 
chants from  sending  Supplies  to  Boston,  was 
highly  disapproved,     .         -         -         -         - 

Handbill  received  at  New- York  from  Boston, 

Memorandums  for  a  Report,  on  providing  perma- 
nent Barracks  for  the  Troops  at  Boston, 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  New- York, 

Meeting  of  Importers  of  Goods  from  Great  Bri- 
tain, in  the  City  of  New- York, 

Meeting  of  the  Lihabitants  of  the  Town  of  Stam- 
ford, in  Connecticut,  -         -  i      - 

Letter  from  London.  Reasons  why  the  Ameri- 
cans should  persevere,  and  oppose  with  vigor- 
ous measures  the  Tyranny  of  the  British  Go- 
vernment, ...... 

Letter  from  James  Lovell  to  Josiah  Cluincy,  Jim., 


PttOVINCIAL  CONGRESS  OF  MASSACHUSETTS. 

Oct.  5,  Members  elected  to  serve  in  the  General  Assem- 
bly of  Massachusetts,  meet  at  Salem, 
7,      Their  Resolutions  on  the  refusal  of  the  Govern- 
our to  admit  them  to  the  usual  oaths. 
Provincial  Congress  formed,  ... 

Names  of  the  Delegates  from  the  several  Towns, 
Adjourn  to  meet  at  Concord,  ... 

1 1,  The  Provincial  Congress  meets  at  Concord, 
■■  John  Hancock  electwl  President,  and  Benjamin 

Lincohi  Secretary, 

12,  Committee  appointwi  to  take  into  consideration 

the  state  of  the  Province, 

13,  Address  to  tho  Governour  reported  by  the  Com. 

mittee,  read  and  accepted,  with  one  dissenting 
voice  only,  ...... 

Committee  to  present  Address  to  the  Governour, 

1 4,  Constables,  Collectors  of  Taxes,  Deputy  Sheriffs, 

and  Sheriffs,  directed  not  to  pay  over  Money  ; 
but  to  retain  it  in  their  hands,  subject  to  the 
order  of  the  Towns,  Provincial  Congress,  or 
General  Assembly,  ..... 
17,  Answer  of  Governour  Gage  to  the  Address  of 
the  Provincial  Congress,  -  -  *  . 
Referred  to  the  Committee  on  the  state  of  the 

Province,  ..... 

iietters  said  to  be  wTote  by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Peters, 
referred  to  the  same  Coinmittoe,     ... 
18,     The  Galleries  ordered  to  be  cleared,   and  the 
doors  of  the  House  to  be  kept  shut  during  the 
IXbattg  in  tile  Congrvss,     .         ,        .         , 


327 
810 


811 


814 


-     815 


1774. 
Oct. 

18, 
19, 


20, 


21, 


815 


817 


819 
820 

821 
821 

328 

827 


828 
948 


829 

829 
830 
830 
834 
834 

834 

-     834 


835 
83G 


836 
837 


-     837 


837 


22, 


24, 


25, 


26, 


27, 


837 


28. 


838 

838 
838 
838 
838 

-     839 


A  Reply  to  be  made  to  the  Answer  of  the  Gov- 
ernour,     ....-•- 
Reply  to  the  Governour  reported,  read,  and  re- 
committed;    reported   again,   considered,  and 
laid  on  the  table,         -         -         -         -         - 
Report  from  the  Committee  appointed  to  inquire 

into  the  state  and  operations  of  the  Army, 
Committee  to  consider  what  is  necessary  for  the 

defence  and  safety  of  the  Province, 
Report  relative  to  Pa\-ment  and  Collecting  of  out- 
standing Rates  and  Taxes,  ... 

Resolution  relative  to  the  Counsellors  and  others, 
who  have  acted  in  obedience  to  the  late  Act  of 
Parliament,  for  altering  the  Government  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  .... 
Committee  to  publish  the  names  of  the  Mr.ndaraus 
Counsellors  and  others,  who  have  acted  under 
commissions  derived  from  the  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment,       ..-...-     839 

Committee  to  report  a  Non-Consumption  Agree- 
ment relative  to  British  and  India  Goods,        -     839 

Committee  to  examine  Rivington's  Newspaper,        840 

Resolution  adopted,  recommending  the  total  dis- 
use of  India  Tea,         -         -         -         -         -     840 

Report  of  Committee,  on  Defence  of  the  Province, 
read,  and  deferred, 840 

Consideration  of  the  Report  resumed,  and  recom- 
mitted,              -        -     840 

Consideration  of  the  propriety  of  sending  Agents 
to  Canada,  referred  to  the  next  meeting  of  the 
Congress,  - 840 

Day  of  Publick  Thanksgiving  throughout  the 
Province  recommended,       ....     840 

Report  on  the  Safety  and  Defence  of  the  Province, 
amended,  and  recommitted  for  further  amend- 
ment,       -        -        -        -         -        -        -841 

Committee  to  consider  of  the  most  proper  time  to 
provide  a  stock  of  Powder,  Ordnance,  and  Ord- 
nance Stores  for  the  Province,       -         -         -     841 

Committee  on  Non-Consumption  Agreement  di- 
rected to  report  forthwith,  -         -         -     841 

Debates  of  the  Congress  to  be  kept  secret,  tmtil 
leave  shall  be  given  to  disclose  the  same,        -     841 

Committee  report  that  now  is  the  proper  time  to 
provide  a  stock  of  Powder,  Ordnance,  and 
Ordnance  Stores,         -         -         -         -         -     841 

Committee  to  determine  what  Quantity  shall  be 
provided,  and  an  Estimate  of  the  expense,         -     841 

Consideration  of  Report  on  the  Safety  and  De- 
fence of  the  Province  resumed,  and  recommit- 
ted for  further  amendments,  -         -         -     84 1 

Committee  on  Non-Consumption  Agreement  or- 
dered to  sit  forthwith,  ....     842 

Committee  to  inquire  into  the  state  of  the  Stores 
in  the  Commissary  General's  Office,      -         -     842 

Report  on  the  quantity  of  Powder  and  Ordnance 
Stores  necessary  for  the  Province,  -         -     842 

All  matters  which  shall  come  under  the  consi- 
deration of  the  Congress,  to  be  kept  secret,     -     842 

Report  on  the  Safety  and  Defence  of  the  Prov- 
ince, 842 

Report  considered  and  adopted,  ...     843 

Committee  to  consider  what  Military  Exercise 
will  be  best  for  the  People  of  the  Province  to 
adopt, 845 

Committee  of  Safety  appointed,  ...     845 

Five  Commissaries  appointed,  ...     845 

Three  General  Officers  appointed,  -         -     845 

Committee,  to  sit  during  the  recess  of  the  Con- 
gress, appointed,  .....     845 

Receiver  General  to  be  appointed  to.morrow ; 
and  Members  particularly  enjoined  to  attend,        845 

Reply  to  the  Governour's  Answer  recommitted 
for  amendments,  .         ,         ,         .         .     845 

Receiver  General  appointed,  ...     846 

Report  of  Coinraittee  on  the  state  of  the  Prov- 
ince, relative  to  the  removal  of  the  Inhabitants 
of  the  ToOTi  of  Boston  from  thence,  read,  and 
recommitted,      ......     846 

Report  relative  to  Collecting  and  Paying  out- 
standing Tuxes,  read,  and  adopted,  -         -     846 

Committee  to  report  a  Resolve  relative  to  a  Non- 
Consumption  Agreement,  ...     847. 

Committee  to  report  on  an  equal  Representation 
of  the  Province  in  Congress,  at  tlie  next  meet- 
ing,   848 

Constitutional  Coimscllors  invited  to  attend  Con- 
gress at  the  ne.\t  meeting,     ,         ,         .         .     848 


LXIX 

1774. 
Oct. 

28. 


CONTENTS. 


liXX 


29. 


The  Resolve  for  a  Non-Consumption  Agreement, 
presented  and  adopted,  .         -         .         .     848 

Report  on  the  Warlike  Stores  in  the  Commissa- 
ry General's  Office,  ....     848 

Report  on  a  System  of  Military  Exercise  for  the 
Province,  ......     848 

Consideration  of  the  state  of  the  Executive  Courts 
of  the  Province,  referred  to  the  next  meeting 
of  the  Congress,  .        .        .        -         -     849 

Committee  of  Safety  directed  to  write  to  the  Con- 
tinental Congress,  showing  the  grounds  and 
reasons  of  the  proceedings  of  this  Congress,         849 

Reply  to  the  Governour's  Answer  agreed  to, 
unanimously,  and  a  Committee  appointed  to 
present  it,  ...-.-     849 

Committee  to  publish  certain  parts  of  the  Pro- 
ceedings of  the  Congress,  passed  on  the  26th 
and  28th,  ...... 

Two  Members  added  to  tlie  Committee  of  Safety, 

Adjourned  to  the  23d  of  November, 

CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Oct.  9,  Letter  from  Montreal,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.     Opinions  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Canada 
relative  to  the  Quebeck  Act,         ... 
General  Meeting  of  the  English  Inhabitants  of 
Montreal, 

10,  Letter  from  Eliphalet  Dyer,   Roger  Sherman, 

and  Silas  Deane,  to  Governour  Trumbull. — 
Proceedings  of  the  Congress,       ... 

1 1,  Account  of  the  arrest  and  imprisonment  of  Sam- 

uel Dyre,  of  Boston,  .        .        .        - 

12,  Proclamation  of  Governour  Penn.     Inhabitants 

and  Magistrates  of  the  country  west  of  Lau- 
rel Hill  required  to  pay  due  obedience  to  the 
Laws  of  Pennsylvania,  without  the  least  re- 
gard to  the  Proclamation  of  Lord  Dunmore, 

12,  General  Committee  of  South  Carolina  recom- 

mend the  non-importation  of  India  Tea,  and 
the  non-exportation  of  any  Arms  or  Ammu- 
nition whatsoever,      -         -         .         .         . 

13,  Letter  from  Sir  James  Wright  to  the  Earl  of 

Dartmouth.  Protests  and  Dissents  of  the 
People  in  different  parts  of  the  Province,  show 
that  they  are  against  any  Resolutions;  and 
that  those  attempted  by  a  few  in  Savannah,  are 
held  in  contempt,        ..... 

14,  Address  from  the  County  of  Worcester,  in  Mas- 

sachusetts, to  Governour  Gage, 
AnsTier  of  the  Governour,       .... 


851 
853 
853 


853 
853 


854 


855 


856 


857 


867 

868 
869 


OrA. 

13, 


CONNECTICUT  ASSEMBLY. 

Meeting  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Eng- 
lish Colony  of  Connecticut,  .        .        . 

To«Tis  in  the  Colony  ordered  to  provide  double 
the  quantity  of  Powder,  Balls,  and  Flints,  they 
were  before  obliged  by  Law  to  provide. 

Cannon  at  New-London  to  be  mounted,  and  kept 
fit  for  service,  with  a  proper  supply  of  Pow- 
der  and  Balls,  .... 

Fifteen  thousand  Pounds,  in  Bills  of  Credit,  to 
be  bsued,  ...... 

Ta.xes  levied  on  the  Polls  and  rateable  Estates  in 
the  Colony,        ...... 

Instructions  and  Regulations  to  the  Overseers  ap- 
pointed by  the  Assembly  for  the  Mohegan  In. 
Qiaiis,        ....... 

Memorial  of  Zebulon  Butler  and  Joseph  Sluman, 
Agents  for  the  Town  of  Westmoreland, 

Memorial  of  Ebenezer  Hazard,  of  New. York, 


858 


-     858 


-     858 
858 


858 


859 

859 
861 


PENNSYLVANIA  ASSEMBLY. 

OcM4,  New  Assembly  meets,             ....  869 

List  of  Members, 860 

Edward  Biddle  chosen  Speaker,       ...  869 
Approved  by  the  Governour,            ...  870 
15,     John  Dickinson  added  to  the  Deputies  from  Penn- 
sylvania to  the  General  Congress,  now  sitting,  870 
Entertainment  to  be  provided  for  the  Members  of 
the  Congress,  on  Thursday  next,            -         -  870 
17,     Message  from  the   Governour.     Recommends 

keeping  the  Rangers  a  longer  time  in  Service,  87 1 
19,      The  Rangers  to  be  kept  in  Pay  until  the  first  of 

November,         ......  871 

Answer  to  the  Governour's  Message,         •         .871 

21,     Adjourn  to  the  5th  of  December,       ...  371 


1774. 

Oct. 
14, 


16, 


16, 
18, 


17, 


17, 


19, 
19, 

20, 

20, 
20, 


20, 
20, 

21, 

22, 

24, 
24, 

24, 

25, 
26, 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Express  from  Lord   Dunmore  arrived  at  Wil- 
liamsburg, with  the  Speeches  at  his  Conference 
with  the  Indians,         ..... 

Speech  of  Captain  White  Eyes, 
Answer  of  Lord  Dunmore  to  the  Delawares  and 
Six  Nation  Chiefs,       ..... 

Intelligence  from  Captain  Pipe,  at  a  Conference 
with  several  Delaware  and  Mohawk  Chiefs,   - 
Speech  of  the  Mohegans  to  the  Shawanese, 
Answer  of  the  Shawanese,       .... 

Reply  of  the  Mohawk  and  Delaware  Chiefs  to 
Lord  Dunmore,  ..... 

Speech  of  the  Big  Apple  Tree,  a  Mohawk  Chief, 
Answer  of  Lord  Dunmore,      .... 

Reply  of  the  Delawares,  .... 

Speech  of  Edmund  Burke,  on  offering  himself  a 
Candidate  to  represent  the  City  of  Bristol  in 
Parliament,        ...... 

Letter  from  Dr.  Samuel  Cooper  to  John  Adams, 
Proclamation  of  Governour  Penn.     Officers  of 
the  Customs  prevented  by  a  Mob  from  seizing 
a  quantity  of  foreign  Sugar  that  had  not  been 
entered  at  the  Custom  House,  nor  the  Duties 
paid.     All  Civil  Officers  required  to  bring  the 
Offenders  to  justice,      ..... 

Letter  from  Captain  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Joseph 
Shippen,  Jun.,     ...... 

Speech  from  Captain  Pipe  to  the  Governour,  in 
answer  to  his  Messages  sent  to  the  Shawanese 
and  the  Delawares,     .... 

Letter   from   Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.    Additional  Troops  expected  from 
Quebeck,    New. York,    and    Newfoundland. 
Despairs  of  any  overtures  for  paying  for  the 
Tea,  unless  recommended  by  the  Continental 
Congress,  ...... 

Circular  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to 

the  Governours  of  the  Colonies, 
Order  of  the  King,  in  Coimcil,  prohibiting  the 
exportation   of  Gunpowder,   or    any  sort  of 
Arms  or  Ammunition  from  Great  Britain, 
General  Committee  of  South  Carolina  recom. 
mend  Merchants  and  others,  as  they  prize  the 
tranquillity  and  happiness  of  America,  not  to 
take  advantage  of  the  publick  distresses  by  rais- 
ing the  prices  of  imported  Goods, 
Address  to  the  People  of   Halifax  County,  in 
Virginia,  ..... 

Tea  at  Annapolis,  in  Maryland,  imported  in  the 
Brig  Peggy  Stewart,  from  London.  Acknow- 
ledgement of  the  Owners  of  the  Tea,  that  they 
had  committed  a  Inost  daring  insult,  and  an 
act  of  the  most  pernicious  tendency  to  the  Li- 
berties of  America ;   they  ask  pardon  of  the 
People,  and  voluntarily  burn  the  Vessel  with 
all  her  Sails  and  Colours  flying,    - 
Thanks  to  the  Merchants  of  New- York,  who 
assisted  in  providing  Barracks  for  the  Troops 
at  Boston,  ...... 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  New. York.     Rea- 
sons for  their  paying  obedience  to  Great  Bri- 
tain, and  the  advantages  they  will  derive  from 
submission,         ...... 

Resolutions  of  sundry   Inhabitants  of  Frances 
Town,  in  New-Hampshire,  ... 

Letter  from  Silas  Deane,  at  Philadelphia,  to  Go- 
vernour Trumbull.     The  greatest  unanimity 
has  prevailed  through  the  whole  of  the  Pro- 
ceedings of  the  Congress,    -         -         .         . 
Proclamation  of  Governour  Wright.     Grants  of 
Land  in  Georgia,        ..... 

Proclamation   of   Governour   Wright.     Treaty 

with  the  Creek  Indians,  at  Savannah,  on  the 

20th  inst.     Trade  with  the  Indians  renewed. 

Letter  from  Quebeck  to  a  Gentleman  in  Boston, 

Instructions  to  the  English   Gentlemen  of  the 

Committee  of  Montreal,  from  the   Canadian 

Farmers,  -     '    - 

Association  signed  by  the  Ladies  of  Edenton,  in 

North  Carolina, 

Letter  from  Joseph  Reed,  at  Philadelphia,  to 
Josiah  Quincy,  Jun.,  London.  Instead  of  divi- 
ded counsels  and  feeble  measures  in  the  Colo- 
nies, all  now  is  union  and  firmness.  The  Mem- 
bers of  the  Congress  part  with  each  other  on 
terms  of  the  utmost  friendship, 


871 

872 

872 

874 
874 
874 

875 
875 
875 
876 


876 

878 


878 


879 


-     879 


880 
881 


-     881 


-     882 


885 


886 


886 
888 


888 
889 


1137 
891 


891 


891 


-     892 


LXXI 

1774. 

Sept. 
5. 


CONTENTS.  LXXii 


12, 
14, 


17, 


19, 
22, 


24, 


26, 


27, 


28, 


CONTINENTAL   CONGRESS. 

Meeting  of  ihe  Delegates  chosen  and  appointed 
by  ihli  several  Colonies  and  Provinces,  in  North 
America,  to  hold  a  Congress  at  Philadelphia, 
Members  present  from  the  several  Colonies, 
Peyton  Randolph  elected  President, 
Credentials  read  and  approved,  .         -         - 

For  New-Hampshire,  .         .         -         - 

Massachusetts, 

Rhode-Island, 

Connecticut, 

New- York, 

New-Jersey, 

Permsylvauia,      .         -        -         -         - 
EKdaware,  .         .         -        -         - 

Maryland, 

Virginia, 

South  Carolina,  .        .         .         - 

Richard  Henry  Lee,  from  Virginia,  attended,     - 
Rules  of  Order  adopted,  -        -        -        - 

Reverend  Mr.  Duchd  requested  to  open  the  Con- 
gress with  Prayers,     -         -         -         -         - 

Thomas  Jolmson,  Jim.,  from  Maryland  attended. 
Committee  appointed  to  state  the  Rights  of  the 
Colonies,  the  instances  in  which  they  are  vio- 
lated, and  the  means  most  proper  to  obtain  a 
restoration  of  them,     -        -        -        -        - 

Committee  appointed  to  examine  and  report  the 
several  Statutes  which  affect  the  Trade  and 
Manufactures  of  the  Colonies,      -        -        - 
President  authorized  to  adjourn,  from  day  to  day, 
when  there  is  no  business,  ... 

Matthew  Tilghman,  a  Delegate  from  Maryland, 
attended,    ------- 

William  Hooper  and  Joseph  Hewes,  from  North 
Carolina,  attended,      -        .        -        -        - 
Henry  Wisner,  from  Orange  County,  in  New- 
York,  attended,  .         .         -         -         - 
George  Ross,  from  Pennsylvania,  and  John  Al- 

sop,  from  New- York,  attended,     - 
Delegates  from  Massachusetts  presented  the  Pro- 
ceedings of  the  Joint  Committees  of  the  Towns 
in  the  County  of  Middlesex,  at  Concord,  on 
the  30th  and  3 1st  of  August,        ... 
Richard  Caswell,  from  North  Carolina,  attended, 
Resolutions  of  the  County  of  Suffolk,  Massachu- 
setts, on  the  6th  inst,  laid  before  the  Congress, 
Resolution  of  the  Congress,  approving  of  the 
Suffolk  County  Resolutions,  ... 

Contributions  from  all  the  Colonies  for  supplying 
the  Sufferers  in  Boston,  should  be  continued,  - 
Report  of  the  Committee  appointed  to  examine 

the  Statutes,  brought  inJand  laid  on  the  table. 
Referred  to  the  Conamittee  appointed  to  state  tlie 
Rights  of  the  Colonies,         .... 

Merchants  and  others  in  the  several  Colonies  re- 
quested not  to  send  to  Great  Britain  any  orders 
for  Goods,  .        .        -        .        - 

Report  of  Committee  on  the  Rights  of  the  Colo- 
nies, brought  in  and  read,    -        .        .        . 
Copy  of  the  Report  made  out  for  each  Colony,   - 
The  Report  considered,  .... 

Congress  will  now  consider  only  such  Rights  as 
have  been  infringed  since   1763,   postponing 
the  consideration  of  the  General  Rights  of 
America  to  a  future  day,       .... 

Conmjittee  appointed  to  state  the  Rights,  brought 
in  a  Report  of  the  Infringements  and  Viola- 
tions of  American  Rights, 
Consideration  of  the  Report  deferred, 
Congress,  in  the  meanwhile,  to  deliberate  on  the 
Means  to  be  pursued  for  a  restoration  of  our 

Rights, 

John  Herring,  from  Orange  County,  New- York, 
attended,  ...... 

Consideration  of  the  Means  for  restoring  Rights, 
resiune'd,  ...... 

Further  considered,  ..... 

Importation  of  all  Goods,  Wares,  and  Merchan- 
dise, whatsoever,  from  Great  Britain,  or  Ire- 
land, prohibited  after  first  of  December  next, 
None  exported  from  Great  Britain,  or  Ireland, 
after  that  day,  shall  be  used  or  purchased  in 
the  Colonies,     ...... 

Resolution  offered  by  Mr.  Galloway,  declaring 
the  Colonics  hold  in  abhorrence  the  idea  of 
being  considered  Independent  Communities,    - 


893 
893 
893 
893 
893 
894 
894 
893 
896 
896 
896 
897 
897 
897 
898 
898 
898 

899 
899 


899 

900 
900 
900 
900 
901 
901 

901 
901 

901 

904 

904 

904 

904 

-    904 

904 
904 
905 

905 


905 
905 


905 

905 

905 
905 

905 

905 

905 


1774. 

Sept. 

28, 

29, 

80, 


Oct.l, 


3, 


4, 
5. 


7, 

8. 


10. 


Mr.  Galloway's  Plan  for  a  proposed  union  be- 
tween Great  Britain  and  the  Colonies,  -     905 
Meansof  restoring  the  Rights,  considered,          -     906 
Further  considered,         .....     906 
Further  considered,         .....     906 
Exportation  of  all  Merchandise  whatsoever,  from 
the  Colonies  to  Great  Britain,  Ireland,  and  the 
West  Indies,  prohibited  after  the  1st  of  Sep- 
tember, 1775,  unless  American  Grievances  are 
redressed  before  that  time,              ...     906 
Committee  to  prepare  a  Plan  to  carry  into  effect 
the  Non- Importation,  Non-Consumption,  and 
Non-Exportation  resolved  on,       -         -         -     906 
Simon  Boerum,  from  King's  County,  New- York, 

attended, ^06 

Means  of  restoring  the  Rights,  further  considered,     906 
Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  to  the  King, 

requesting  a  Redress  of  Grievances,      -         -     907 
Instructions  to  the  Committee  on  the  Address,     -     907 
Matters  proper  to  be  contained  in  the  Address 
considered,  ...---     907 

Further  considered, 907 

Further  considered,        -         -        -         -        -     907 
Instruction  to  the  Committee  on  the  Address,     -    907 
Address  from  William  Goddard  received,          -     907 
Means  for  restoration  of  American  Rights  fur- 
ther considered, 907 

Letter  from  the  Boston  Committee  of  Correspond- 
ence laid  before  Congress,  ...     907 
Letter  to  be  considered  to-morrow,  -        -     908 
Consideration  of  means  for  restoration  of  Rights, 
resumed,            -        -        -        -        -        -908 

Instruction  to  Committee  appointed  to  prepare  the 
form  of  an  Association,         ....     908 

Letter  from  Boston  Committee  considered,  -     908 

Committee  to  prepare  a  Letter  to  General  Gage,  908 
Letter  from  Boston  further  considered,  -  -  908 
Opposition  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Massachusetts  to 
late  Acts  of  Parliament  approved  by  Congress. 
If  the  Acts  are  attempted  to  be  enforced  by 
Arms,  all  America  ought  to  support  them  in 
their  opposition,  -         ...         -     908 

Letter  from  Boston  further  considered,       .        -     908 
Removal  of  the  People  from  Boston,  so  impor- 
tant in  its  consequences  as  to  require  the  utmost 
deliberation.     If   absolutely    necessary,  they 
should  be  recompensed  by  all  America,  -    90S 

People  of  Massachusetts  advised  to  submit  to 
a  suspension  of  the  administration  of  justice, 
where  it  cannot  be  procured  under  the  Charter,  909 
Any  Person  who  shall  act  under  any  authority 
derived  from  the  Act  of  Parliament,  altering 
the  Government  of  Massachusetts,  to  be  held 
in  detestation,  as  a  wcked  tool  of  the  despo- 
tism, which  is  preparing  to  destroy  the  Rights 
of  America,        ......     909 

11,  Letter  from  the  Congress  to  General  Gage,        -     909 
People  of  Boston  advised  to  conduct  themselves 

peaceably  towards    General    Gage   and  the 

Troops, 909 

Committee  to  prepare  a  Memorial  to  the  People 
of  British  America;  and  an  Address  to  the 
People  of  Great  Britain,      -         -         -         -     910 

12,  Plan  for  carrying  into  effect  the  Non-Importa- 

tion, Non-Consumption,  and  Non-Exportation 
Agreement,  reported  by  the  Committee,  -     910 

Consideration  of  the  Rights  and  Grievances  of  the 
Colonies  resumed,       -         -         -         -         -     910 

13,  Further  considered, 910 

14,  Further  considered,         -         -         -         -         -910 
Resolutions  declaring  the  Rights  and  Grievances 

of  the  Colonies, 910 

Letter  from  several  Gentlemen,  in  Georgia,  read,    912 

15,  Plan  of  Association  further  considered,      -         -     912 

17,  John  Dickinson,  from  Pennsylvania,  attended,         913 
Plan  of  Association  further  considered,      -         -     913 

1 8,  Plan  further  considered,  amended,  and  ordered  to 

be  transcribed,  to  be  signed  by  the  Members,      913 
Address  to  the  People  of  Great  Britain  reported,     913 

19,  The  Address  considered,  amended,  and  recom- 

mitted,        913 

Memorial  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Colonies  re- 
ported,       913 

20,  The  Association  read  and  signed,      -         -         -    9 1 3 
Fac  simile  of  the  Signatures  to  the  Asssocia- 

tion,           -         -         .         .         .      Opposite    916 
Memorial  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Colonies  fur- 
ther considered, 916 


LXXIII 

1774. 

Ckt.2l,  Address  to  the  People  of  Great  Britain,     -        -    917 
Memorial  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Colonics,      -     921 
Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  to  the  People 
of  Q,uebeck,  and  Letters  to  the  Colonies  of  St. 
John's,  Nova-Scotia,  Georgia,  and  East  and 

West  Florida, 928 

Committee  to  revise  the  Minutes  of  Congress,  928 

Address  to  the  King  considered,   recommitted, 

and  Mr.  Dickinson  added  to  the  Committee,         928 
The  seizing  a  Person,  in  America,  to  transport 
him  beyond  the  Sea,  for  Trial,  declared  to  be 
against  the  Lavsr,  and  ought  to  meet  with  re- 
sistance and  reprisal,  ....     928 
22,     Peyton  Randolph  unable  to  attend  the  Congress, 

Henry  Middleton  chosen  President,       -         -     928 
Address  from  Christopher  TuUy  received,          -     928 
Journal  ordered  to  be  printed,            ...     928 
A  Congress  to  be  held  on  the  10th  of  May  next, 
unless  redress  of  Grievances  should  be  sooner 
obtained,  recommended,        ....     928 
Letter  from  Congress  to  the  Colonies  of  St. 
John's,  &c., 929 

24,  Address  to  the  People  of  Q,uebeck  reported,  con- 

sidered, and  recommitted,      ....     929 
Address  to  the  King  reported,  ...     929 

25,  Address  considered,  approved,  and  ordered  to  be 

engrossed,  ......    929 

To  be  sent  to  the  Colony  Agents,  to  be  presented 
to  his  Majesty ;  and  the  Agents  requested  to 
call  in  the  aid  of  such  Noblemen  and  Gentle- 
men as  are  firm  friends  to  American  Liberty,  929 
Committee  to  prepare  a  Letter  to  the  Agents,  -  929 
Thanks  of  Congress  to  the  patriotick  Advocates  of 
Civil  and  Religious  Liberty  who  have  espoused 
the  cause  of  America,  both  in  and  out  of  Par- 
liament,      929 

26,  Letter  to  the  Colony  Agents,  -        -        -     929 
Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Province  of 

Quebeck, 930 

Address  to  the  King,      .....  934 

List  of  the  Colony  Agents,       ....  933 

List  of  the  Delegates  who  attended  the  Congress,  938 

CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Oct.    Letter  from  Govemour  CJage  to  Peyton  Ran- 
20,        dolph,  in  reply  to  the  Letter  from  the  Con- 
gress, of  the  10th  of  October,         ... 

Letter  to  Peyton  Randolph,  late  President  of 
the  American  Continental  Congress,  from  an 
Inhabitant  of  Massachusetts,  against  the  Pro- 
ceedings of  the  Congress,  and  defending  the 
conduct  of  General  Gage,  ... 

Letter  to  General  Gage,  from  Williamsburg,  in 
Virginia,  ...... 

Letter  from  John  Dickinson  to  Arthur  Lee.  The 
Colonies  have  taken  such  grounds  that  Great 
Britain  must  relax,  or  involve  herself  in  a  Civil 
War.  A  determined  and  unanimous  resolu- 
tion animates  the  Continent, 

Letter  from  John  Dickinson  to  Josiah  Quincy, 
Jun.  The  most  peaceable  Provinces  are  now 
animated ;  and  a  Civil  War  is  inevitable,  unless 
there  be  a  quick  change  of  British  measures. 

Letter  from  Colonel  Charles  Lee  to  the  Duke 
of  — .  All  orders  of  men,  throughout  the  Col- 
onies, are  enthusiastick  in  the  cause  of  Free- 
dom. The  People  have  Arms,  and  are  expert 
in  their  use,        ...... 

Letter  from  Govemour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. The  Provincial  Congress,  it  is  report- 
ed, had  in  agitation  the  embodying  of  fifteen 
thousand  Men,  to  be  ready,  at  a  moment's  warn- 
ing, and  to  be  supported  by  the  neighbouring 
Provinces.  It  is  the  intention  of  the  Congress 
to  assemble  the  old  Council  at  the  next  meet- 
ing, to  form  as  complete  a  Government  as  pos- 
sible for  the  Province,  .... 

Letter  from  Josiah  Quincy  to  Josiah  Gluincy,  Jun., 

Letter  from  Govemour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth,      ....... 

NavA,  Address  of  the  Grand  Jury  for  the  County  of  Es- 
sex, in  New-Jersey,  to  Frederick  Smith,  Chief 
Justice  of  the  Province,         .... 

Letter  from  a  Gentleman,  at  Bladensburg,  Mary- 
land, to  his  brother,  in  Glasgow.  Virginia  is 
raising  a  Company  of  Men  in  every  County. 
Maryland  has  begun  to  raise  Men  in  every 


CONTENTS. 


27, 
27, 


28, 


29, 


30, 


989 


939 
945 


-     947 


947 


949 


31, 
31, 


1. 


950 
951 

952 


967 


1774. 


Nov. 
2, 


2, 

3, 

2, 
2. 

2, 


2, 


3, 


4, 
5, 


5, 

6, 
6, 


LXXIV 

County  also.  To  the  Northward  they  have 
large  Bodies  ready  for  the  field.  Regulation 
of  prices  of  imported  Goods,  ...     953 

Circular  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to 
the  Governours  of  the  Colonies.  Requires 
Returns  every  three  months  of  the  state  of 
their  respective  Councils,     ....     953 

Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieutenant 
Governour  Coldcn.  Requires  him  to  be  par- 
ticularly attentive  to  prevent  the  importation  of 
Gunpowder ;  he  has  every  day  intelligence  of 
the  Americans  purchasing  large  quantities  of 
Arms  and  Ammunition  in  the  different  Ports 
of  Europe, 953 

Council  of  Pennsylvania  authorize  the  laying  out 
a  King's  Highway,  from  the  Wind  Gap,  on  the 
North  side  of  the  Blue  Mountain,  to  Wyoming,     954 

Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Governour 
Penn,  dated  August  26.  Requires  him  to  de- 
sist from  extending  the  jurisdiction  of  Pennsyl- 
vania to  the  line  run  by  the  Commissioners  of 
that  Province  and  Maryland,         ...     954 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Penn,  requiring  Ma- 
gistrates and  others  to  desist  from  exercising 
jurisdiction  beyond  those  places  where  it  has 
been  heretofore  exercised,  until  his  Majesty's 
pleasure  shall  be  known  in  the  premises,         -     955 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. Explanation  of  his  motives  for  issuing 
the  Proclamation  for  extending  the  jurisdic- 
tion,   955 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 
Report  of  the  Battle  between  the  Indians  and 
Colonel  Lewis,  .....     955 

Address  of  the  Committee  to  the  Freeholders  and 
Electors  of  the  City  and  County  of  Philadel- 
phia. Recommend  the  election  of  a  new 
Conwnittee,  under  the  Association  of  the  Con- 
gress,       - 956 

Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Golden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  The  Congress  broke  up 
last  week.  Their  measures  do  not  meet  with 
applause  in  New- York ;  on  the  contrary,  the 
City  is  rather  dissatisfied.  The  Merchants 
dislike  the  Non-Importation,  and  the  Farmers 
will  not  bear  the  Non-Exportation.  A  great 
majority  in  the  Province  disapprove  of  the 
dangerous  measures  of  the  New  England  Go- 
vernments,       ......     957 

Letter  from  an  Officer  at  Boston,  to  his  friend  in 
Edinburgh.  The  Faction  at  Boston  is  very 
low.  All  ranks  of  People  are  heartily  tired 
of  disorder ;  and  as  soon  as  the  determination 
of  Great  Britain  to  despise  their  Resolves  and 
Petitions,  is  known,  all  will  be  quiet,     -         -     957 

Letter  from  Doctor  Chauncy  to  Josiah  Gluincy, 
Jun.,  London.  The  Colonies  are  united  in 
their  resolution  to  defend  their  Liberties.  All 
wish  for  a  restoration  of  harmony,  and  dread  a 
bloody  conflict;  yet  this  they  will  universally  c' 
go  into,  rather  than  submit  to  the  tyrannical 
measures  imposed  on  them,  ...    953 

Letter  from  Governour  Perm  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth,       958 

Charge  of  William  Henry  Drayton,  one  of  the 
Judges  of  the  General  Sessions  of  the  Peace, 
for  the  Districts  of  Camden  and  Cheraws,  in 
South  Carolina,  on  his  Circuit,  the  fifth  and  fif- 
teenth days  of  November,  to  the  several  Grand 
Juries,       ...--..    959 
Presentments  of  the  Grand  Jury  for  the  District 
of  Camden,        -        -        -        -        -        -961 

Presentments  of  the  Grand  Jury  for  the  Cheraws 

District, %2 

Address  of  the  Petit  Jury  of  Cheraws  District,  to 
Judge  Drayton,  .....     962 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Officers 
under  the  command  of  Lord  Dunmore,  con- 
vened at  Fort  Gower,  ....     962 

Sheep  not  permitted  to  be  sent  from  New- York 

to  the  West  Indies, 963 

Letter  from  Joseph  Reed  to  Josiah  Gluincy,  Jun. 
The  Quakers  have  directed  their  members  not 
to  serve  on  the  Committee  for  carrying  into 
effect  the  Association  of  Congress ;  yet,  in  Phil- 
adelphia, there  is  no  fear  that  any  discontented 
spirit  dares  oppose  the  measures  necessary  for 
the  publick  safety.      There  is  more  fear  for 


1774. 

Ntm. 
7, 


7, 
7. 


CONTENTS. 


1.XXVI 


7. 
7, 

7. 


8, 


8, 
9. 


10. 

10, 
11, 

11. 

12, 

12, 
14, 

14, 
15, 
15. 

15, 

15, 


15. 


16, 

16, 


New- York,  where  there  has  been  a  strange 
delinquency  the  whole  Summer, 
Meeting  of  tlie  Inhabitants  of  York,  in  Virginia, 
and  Procec-ding-s  of  the  County  Committee,  on 
the  arrival  of  Tea,      -         :,',,',. 
Meeting  of  the  Committee  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  Gloucester,  in  Virginia,  on  the  arrival  of  Tea, 
Concession  of  John  Prentiss  to   the  York  and 
Gloucester  Committees,  for  importing  Tea,     - 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  City  of  Phila- 
delphia, to  make  arrangements  for  electing  a 
Committee,         -         -         -         ■         "      .   " 
New- York  Committee  recommend  the  election 
of  a  Committee  of  Inspection,  for  the  purposes 
expressixi  in  the  Association  of  Congress, 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Boston, 
Leuer  'from  New- York  to  a  Correspondent  m 
London,  -         •         -         "         '         * 

Meeting  at  Marblehead,  in  Massachusetts.      Ap- 
pointed a  Committee  to  execute  the  Associa- 
tion ;  and  fixed  a  day  for  choosing  Militia  Of- 
ficers,       -         -         -         -         "         ■         * 

Meeting  of  the    Committee  for   Westmoreland 
County,  in  Virginia.      Resolutions  relative  to 
David  Wardrobe,         .         .         -         ■ 
Letter  from  David  Wardrobe  to  Archibald  Pro- 
van,  of  Glasgow,  dated  June  30, 
Proclamation  of  Governour  Eden, 
Meeting  of  the   Inhabitants  of    Anne  Arundel 
County,  and  the  City  of  Annapolis.      Com- 
mittee of  Observation  and  Committee  of  Cor- 
respondence appointed,         .         -         -         - 
Address  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others,  of 
Williamsburg,  to  Pej-ton  Randolph  and  the 
other  Delegates,  .         -         -         -         - 

Answer  to  the  Address,  -        -        ■ 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Gage,  against  the 

Resolves  of  the  Provincial  Congress, 
Treaty  of  Peace,   Friendship,  and   Commerce, 
concluded  on  the  20th  of  October,  between 
Georgia  and  the  Creek  Indians, 
Concession  of  Nicholas  Austin,  to  the  Committee 
of  Correspondence  of  Rochester,    in   New- 
Hampshire,        ..---- 

Proclamation    of   Lieutenant   Governour  Bull. 

Trade  opened  with  the  Creek  and  Cherokee 

Indians.     Revokes  all  Indian  Trade  Licenses, 

and  requires  new  ones  to  be  taken  out. 

Committee  of  Observation  for  Baltimore  County, 

in  Maryland,  appointed,       .         .         .         - 

Political  Observations,  without  order,  addressed  to 

the  People  of  America.        .         -         -         - 

Reply  to  the  foregoing.  .         .         -         . 

Another  Reply.    -        -        -        -        -        - 

Letter  from  the  New- York  Committee  to  Daniel 
Dunscomb.  Chairman  of  the  Committee   of 
Mechanicks.      .        .        -        - 
New- York  Committee  having  agreed  to  dissolve, 
appoint  a  day  for  the  election  of  a  new  Com- 
mittee,      ....--- 

Letter  from  a  Gentleman  at   Amsterdam,  to  a 
friend  in  Philadelphia.      A  Vessel  there  load- 
ing with  Ammunition  and  Arms,  stopped  by  a 
Cutter  sent  from  Dover,       .         -         .         . 
Letter  from  Nathaniel  Appleton  to  Josiah  Quin- 
cy,  Jun.     It  is  the  universal  voice  of  the  Peo- 
ple, that  they  will  sacredly  observe  the  recom- 
mendations of  the  Grand  Congress, 
Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth.     The  Proceedings  of  the  Continental 
Congress  astonish  and  terrify  all  considerate 
men.    Though  many  of  their  Resolves  neither 
can  nor  will  be  observed,  it  is  to  be  feared  they 
will  be  generally  received.      Barracks  have 
been  provided  for  the  Troops ;  and  by  various 
means.  Provisions  for  six  months  have  been 
obtained,  ...... 

Letter  from  Grovcmour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.      Violent  proceedings  in  some 
parts  of  New-Hampshire.      No   hopes  of  a 
legal  establishment  of  the  powers  of  Govern- 
ment in  the  Province,  until  they  are  efTectually 
restored  in  Massachusetts,     -         .         .         . 
Proclamation  by  the  King.    Copper  Coins  for 
Virginia,  ..... 

Meeting  of  Inhabitants  of  Calvert  County,  Ma 
ryland.  Committees  of  Observation  and  Cor 
respondence  appointed,        .        .        .        , 


9G3 


9G4 
9G5 


965 


-    965 


967 
908 

969 


970 


.    970 

971 
972 


972 


973 
973 

-    973 


974 


974 


975 

-    975 

976 
977 
978 


-     329 


330 


-    979 


980 


1771. 

Nor. 
16, 
17, 


18. 

18, 

18, 

19, 

21. 
21 


981 


-  981 
r 

-  982 


982 


21, 

22, 
22, 

22, 


23, 
23, 


983 


985 


985 


-    986 


987 
987 


987 


989 


Rt-^olutions  of  the  County  Congress  of  the  County 

of  York,  in  Massachusetts, 
Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Henrico  County, 
Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation  appoint- 
ed, .....-- 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Charles  County, 
Maryland.      Committees  of  Observation  and 
Correspondence,  and  Delegates  to  the  Conven- 
tion appointed,  .         .         .         .         - 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Frederick  County, 
Mainland.      Committees  of  Observation  and 
Correspondence,  and  Delegates  to  the  Conven- 
tion appointed,  ..... 
Address  of  the  Committee  of  Mechanicks,  of  New- 
York,  to  the  Delegates  who  represented  the 
City  in  the  General  Congress,       .         .         - 
Answer  of  the  Delegates,         .         .         .         - 
Address  to  the  People  of  New- Jersey.  Condemns 
the  Resolutions  of  the  Congress.     There  are 
no  instances  of  Laws  so  severe,  or  any  regula- 
tions so  inimical  to  Liberty,  as  their  Resolves, 
Tomi  Meeting  at  Providence,  in  Rhode-Island. 
One  hundred  and  twenty-five  Pounds  voted  for 
the  distressed  Inhabitants  of  Boston, 
Letter  from  Dr.  Joseph  Warren,  to  Josiah  Quin- 
cy,  Jun.     It  is  the  united  voice  of  America, 
to  preserve  their  Freedom,  or  lose  their  lives 
in  defence  of  it.     The  Resolutions  of  the  Con- 
gress are  not  the  effect  of  inconsiderate  rash- 
ness, but  the  sound  result  of  sober  inquiry  and 
deliberation.     If  the  Acts  of  Parliament  are 
not  repealed  the  wisest  step  for  both  Countries 
is  to  sejiarate,  and  not  spend  their  blood  and 
treasure  in  destroying  each  other, 
Maryland  Convention,     -         .         .         -         - 
Several  Counties  not  being  represented  the  Con- 
vention adjourned  to  the  8th  of  December, 
Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Elizabeth  City 
County,  Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation 
appointed. 
Letter  from  an  -Officer  in  the  Army  at  Boston. 
As  to  the  Colonists  taking  Arms  to  resist  the 
Force  of  England,  it  is  mere  bullying.     Any 
two  Regiments  here  ought  to  be  decimated,  if 
they  did  not  beat  in  the  field  the  whole  Force 
of  the  Massachusetts  Province,     ... 
Committee  of  Sixty   Persons  elected   in  New- 
York,  for  the  purposes  mentioned  in  the  Asso- 
ciation of  Congress,     ..... 
Address  of  the  Magistrates  of  Frederick  County, 
Maryland,  to  the  Deputies  from  the  Province 
to  the  late  Continental  Congress, 
Address  of  the  Grand  Jury  of  Frederick  County, 

Maryland,  to  their  Deputies  in  the  Congress, 
Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Bull  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth,  .... 

Committee  of  Observation,  for  Warwick  County, 
Virffinia,  ......     994 


Nov. 
23, 


24, 


990 
991 

-    991 


-    991 


991 


-     992 


992 
993 


993 


993 

993 

993 

993 
993 


25, 
26, 

28, 


MASSACHUSETTS    PROVINCIAL    CONGRESS. 

The  Provincial  Congress  meets,  agreeably  to 
their  adjournment,  on  the  29th  of  October,     - 

Walter  Spooner,  one  of  his  Majesty's  Constitu- 
tional Council,  desired  to  attend  the  Congress, 

John  Adams  and  Robert  Treat  Paine,  of  the 
Continental  Congress,  desired  to  attend. 

Members  of  the  Continental  Congress  required 
to  report  their  Proceedings,  ... 

Dr.  Appleton  appointed  Chaplain,    ... 

Proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress  reported, 
read,  and  committed,  ....     993 

Petition  from  Officers  of  the  Minute  Men,  in  the 
Northwest  part  of  Worcester  County,  read 
and  committed,  .....     994 

Commiuee  to  prepare  a  Plan  for  the  Defence  and 
Safety  of  the  Government,  required  to  set  forth- 
with,          994 

Committee  to  publish  a  list  of  the  Mandamus 
CoiiiiselloMkand  others  now  in  the  Town  of 
Boston,  fortnwith  to  prepare  a  Report,   -         -     994 

Committee  to  ascertain  the  number  of  Constitu- 
tional Counsellors  now  in  To\\ti,  -         -     994 

Committee  to  devise  means  of  keeping  up  a  Cor- 
respondence with  Montreal  and  Quebeck,      -     995 

Committee  to  prepare  Form  of  an  Order  with 
respect  to  the  Treasurer's  Bond.  -         -     995 

Committee  to  take  into  consideration  the  state  of 


Lxxvn 


CONTENTS. 


LXXVIII 


1774. 

Nov. 
29, 


the  Manufactures,  and  how  they  may  be  im- 
proved in  the  Province,        .         .         -         . 

Committee  to  make  an  estimate  of  the  loss  and 
damage  of  every  kind,  occasioned  by  the  Acts 
of  Parliament  since  the  operation  of  the  Port 
Bill, - 

Committee  to  state  the  amount  of  the  Sums  which 
have  been  extorted  from  us  since  17G3,  under 
certain  Acts  of  the  British  Parliament, 
30,  Members  to  attend  the  Continental  Congress 
on  the  10th  of  May  next,  to  be  appointed  to- 
morrow, ...... 

Letters  from  Doctor  Franklin  to  Mr.  Gushing, 
read  and  referred  to  the  Provincial  Committee 
of  Correspondence,  .  .  .  .  - 
Dec.  1,  Report  of  Committee  on  Proceedings  of  Conti- 
nental Congress,  read,  considered,  and  recom- 
mitted,      ....... 

Thanks  of  the  Congress  to  the  other  Colonies,  for 
their  Donations  to  the  Town  of  Boston, 

Committee  to  call  upon  the  Secretary  for  a  list 
of  the  Mandamus  Counsellors,     .         .         . 

2,  Report  of  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Prov- 

ince, ....... 

Members  to  represent  the  Province  in  Continental 
Congress,  chosen,        ..... 

3,  Report  of  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Prov- 

ince, considered,  ..... 

5,  Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  to  tlie  Clergy, 

desiring  them  to  exhort  the  People  to  sustain 

the  Congress,     ..-.-- 

Report  on  the  Proceedings  of  the  Continental 

Congress  adopted,        ..... 

6,  Committee  to  correspond  with  the  Inhabitants  of 

Canada  appointed,  .  .  .  .  - 
Brief  to  be  circulated  through  the  Province,  to 

promote  Donations  for  the  Sufferers  in  Boston 

ajid  Charlestown,  .  .  .  .  - 
Address  to  the  Clergy,  .  .... 

Mandamus  Counsellors  who  have  published  a 

renunciation  of  their  Commissions, 

7,  Committee  to  prepare  a  true  state  of  the  number 

of  Inhabitants,  and  of  the  Exports  and  Imports 
of  the  Colony,  ..... 

8,  Resolutions  reconmiending  the  encouragement  of 

Manufactures  in  the  Province,  .  .  ^ 
Two  General  Officers  chosen,  ... 

9,  Committee  on  an  Address  from  the  Baptists  to 

the  Congress,     ...... 

Report  of  Committee  relative  to  Publick  Moneys 
in  the  hands  of  Constables  and  others,  adopted. 

Committee  on  a  Plan  of  Military  Exercise  pro- 
posed by  Captain  Pickering,  ... 

Report  of  Committee  on  Address  from  the  Bap- 
tists, adopted,      ...... 

Committee  on  Letter  from  the  Town  of  Hard- 
wick,        ....... 

10,      Report  on  Letter  from  Hard  wick, 

Address  to  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  the  Towns  and  Districts  of  Massachusetts 
Bay, 

Report  of  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Province 
relative  to  assuming  Civil  Government,  consi 
dered,  and  laid  on  the  table, 

Returns  of  the  Officers  and  Men,  of  the  Minute 
Men,  and  the  Militia  to  be  made. 

Report  of  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Province, 

E.xpense  of  transmitting  the  Address  to  the  Cana. 
dians  to  be  paid  by  this  Government, 

The  Congress  dissolved,  .... 


Nov. 
25, 

25, 


26, 

28, 


30, 


995 

995 

995 

996 

996 

996 
996 
997 
997 
997 
997 

997 
997 
999 


999 
1000 

.  1000 


1001 

1001 
1002 

1003 

1003 

1004 

1004 

1004 
1004 

.  1005 
e 

.  1006 


OORUESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Meeting  of  a  great  number  of  the  Freeholders  of 
Chesterfield  County,  Virginia.  County  Com- 
mittee appointed,         ..... 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  James  City  County, 
Virginia.  Committee  of  Observation  appoint, 
cd. 

Committee  for  the  upper  part  of  Frederick  Coun- 
ty, Maryland.     Punishment  of  John  Parks, 

Address  of  Committee  of  Correspondence  to  the 
Freeholders  of  the  County  of  Essex,  in  the 
Province  of  New- Jersey,     -         -         .         . 

Addrr-ss  of  the  Committee  of  Philadelphia  to  the 
Publick,  ...... 

Committee  of  Observation  for  Philadelphia  Coun- 
ty.   


1774. 

Nov. 
30, 


Dec.  1, 

2, 


1008 


1009 


1009 


1010 


1010 


4, 


4, 


5, 


5, 
5, 

5, 


Queries  addressed  to  the  Committees  of  Observ- 
ation, on  the  Pamphlet,  "  A  Friendly  Address 
to  all  Reasonable  Americans,"      -         .         .1011 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Prince  George's  Coun. 
ty,  Maryland.  Committees  of  Observation  and 
Correspondence,  and  Delegates  to  the  Conven- 
tion appointed,  .         .         .         .         -1012 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Elizabethtown,  Essex 
County,  New- Jersey.  Committees  of  Observ. 
ation  and  Correspondence  appointed,     .         .1012 

Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  the  Earl 
of  Dartmouth.  The  measures  recommended 
by  the  Continental  Congress  received,  impli. 
citly,  by  the  People,  as  matters  of  obedience. 
Exportation  of  Sheep  prevented,  by  order  of 
the  Committee,  .         -         .         .         .1013 

Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn. 
Attempt  of  Mr.  Connolly  to  enforce  the  juris, 
diction  of  Virginia,  at  Pittsburgh.  Mr.  Scott, 
a  Pennsylvania  Magistrate,  arrested  by  Con- 
nolly, on  the  12th  of  November,  and  brought 
before  Lord  Dunmore,  at  Fort  Burd,     -         -   1013 

Lord  Dunmore  arrived  at  Williamsburg,  from  his 
expedition  against  the  Indians,  having  brought 
them  to  terms,  and  made  a  Treaty  with  them,    1014 

Letter  from  Red  Stone.  Causes  of  the  Indian  War 
traced  from  the  Treaty  made  by  Colonel  Bou- 
quet, with  the  Shawanese,  in  1764,  to  the  at- 
tack of  Captain  Michael  Cresap  upon  a  party 
of  Indians,  in  April,  1774,  .         .         .1015 

Letter  from  the  Camp,  on  Point  Pleasant,  at  the 
mouth  of  the  Great  Kenhawa,  dated  October 
17th.  Account  of  the  Battle  at  that  place,  on 
the  10th, 1016 

Letter  from  Staunton,  in  Virginia,  of  November 
4th.     A  further  account  of  the  same  Battle,       1017 

List  of  killed  and  wounded  Virginians  in  the  Bat. 
tie  at  Point  Pleasant,  on  the  10th  of  October, 
(Note,) 1018 

Message   from  Logan,   an   Indian  Warrior,  to 

Lord  Dunmore, 1020 

Speech  of  Logan,  a  Shawanese  Chief,  to  Lord 

Dunmore,  (Note,)       .....  io2C 

Address  of  the  City  of  Williamsburg  to  Lord 

Dunmore,  ......   1019 

Answer  to  the  Address,  .         .         .         -  1019 

Address  of  the  President  and  Professors  of  Wil- 
liam and  Mary  College  to  Lord  Dunmore,     .  1019 

Address  of  the  Borough  of  Norfolk  to  Lord  Dun- 
more,        1019 

Answer  to  the  Address,  ....  1020 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Richmond  County, 
Virginia.    Committee  of  Inspection  appointed,  1021 

Committee  of  New.Castle  County,  Etelaware. 
Approve  the  Continental  Association.  Recom. 
mend  to  the  Inhabitants,  from  si.xteen  to  fifty 
years  of  age,  to  form  themselves  into  Military 
Companies,        ......  1022 

Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Reading,  in  Berks 
County,  Pennsylvania.  Committee  of  Obser. 
vation  appointed,        ...  .  io23 


1006 

8, 

1007 

9, 

1008 

10, 

1008 

15, 

20, 

1007 

23, 

ASSEMBLY  OF  PENNSYLVANIA. 

Dec.  5,  The  Assembly  meets, 1023 

Report  from  the  Members  deputed,  in  behalf  of 
this  Province,  to  attend  the  General  Congress, 

Resolutions  of  the  Congress  considered,     . 

Further  considered,  and  unanimously  approved. 

Deputies  to  the  Congress,  to  meet  on  the  1 0th  of 
May  next,  appointed,  .... 

Committee  to  prepare  Instructions  to  the  Depu. 
ties  appointed,  ..... 

Message  from  the  Governour.    Recommends  re- 
pair of  Barracks  in  the  Northern  Liberties, 

Answer  to  the  Governour's  Message.  The  House 
does  not  think  expedient  to  repair  the  Bar^ 
racks,       ...... 

24,  Instructions  to  the  Deputies  considered,  and  the 
further  consideration  postponed  to  the  next 
Session,  ...... 

Adjourned  to  the  20th  of  February  next,    - 


1023 
1023 
1023 

1023 

1024 

1024 


.  1024 


1024 
1025 


CORRESPONDENCE,    PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Dec.  6,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  ^ew. 
York.  First  information  of  the  Resolves  of 
the  Congress  of  the  States  of  America,  -  1025 


■a 


LXXIX 

1774. 

Dec. 

6. 


CONTENTS. 


I.XXX 


6, 


7, 


Mcetino'  of  the  Freeholders  of  Essex  County,  Vir- 
ginia.   Committee  of  Obserration  appointed, 
Committee  of  Isle  of  Wight  County,  Virgmia, 
6       Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Princess  Anne  Coun- 
ty, Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation  ap- 
pointed,    -        -        -        -•        ",    ," 

C      Re-^ulations,  for  the  sale  of  Goods  imported  after 
The  first  day  of  December,  adopted  by  the 
Philadelphia  Committee,     -        "    ,    ,  y^    " 
6,     Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth.   Philadelphia  and  several  of  the  Coun- 
ties have  appointed  Committees  to  enforce  the 
Association,       --■"■' 
Meeting  of  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants  of 
Jamaica,  in  Queen's  County,  New- York.  Ap- 
prove the  Resolutions  of  tKe  Congress.    Com- 
mittee of  Correspondence  and  Observation  ap- 
pointed,   -        -        -        -        "     ,    "        " 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Ne^rark,  m  Esses 
Countj',  New-Jersey.   Committee  of  Observa- 
tion appointed,  -         -         '  ,      "      -■ 
Address  of  the  Committee  to  the  Delegates  for 
New-Jersev,  in  the  Continental  Congress,      - 
dueries  of  the'  Committee  relative  to  Rivington's 
Newspaper,      -        -        -        "  ,,    "      ,  ' 
T,      Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Colden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.     Proceedings  in  New- 
York  on  the  Resolutions  of  Congress.     Dis- 
pute between  the  smugglers  and  fair  traders 
will  probably  defeat  the  Association.    Men  op- 
posed to  the  Congress  on  the  Committee  ;  they 
at  present  support  the  measures  of  the  Con- 
gress, to  prevent  dangerous  men  from  taking 
the  lead,             ..---- 

8.      Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Caroline  County, 
Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation  appoint- 
ed, ■"""""         1 
8,      Meeting  of  the  Deputies  appointed  by  the  several 
Counties  of  the  Province  of  Maryland,  at  the 
City  of  Annapolis,  by  adjournment,  on  the  8th 
of  December,  and  continued  till  the  12th, 
Proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress  unani- 
mously approved,       .         .         -         •         - 
Woollen,  Linen,  and  Cotton  Manufactures  recom- 
mended, ....-- 

Advances  on  the  prime  cost  of  Goods  regulated. 
Suits  not  to  be  brought  in  any  case  for  any  Per- 
son who  violates  the  Continental  Association, 
None  but  Members  of  Committees  to  meddle  with, 
or  determine,  any  question  under  the  Associa- 
tion, .        -        -        -        - 

Will  support,  to  the  utmost  of  their  power,  any 
Colony  where  an  attempt  shall  be  made  to 
carry  into  execution,  by  force,  the  assumed 
power  of  Parliament  to  Tax  the  Colonies, 
Inhabitants  of  the  Province,  from  sixteen  to  fifty 
years  of  age,  to  form  themselves  into  Military 
Companies,        ...... 

Ten  thousand  Pounds  to  be  raised  by  the  Coun- 
ties for  the  purchase  of  Arms  and  Ammuni- 
,  tion,  .....-- 

Committee  of  Correspondence  for  the  Province 
empowered  to  call  a  Meeting  of  the  Conven- 
tion on  the  24th  of  April  next,     - 
Contributions  for  the  Suffering  Poor  of  Boston  to 
be  continued,     ------ 

Committee  of  Correspondence  appointed. 
Delegates  to  the  next  Continental  Congress  ap- 
pointed,   ------- 

Colonies  and  Provinces  generally  requested  to 
enter  into  such    Resolutions  as   have    been 
adopted  by  this  Province,  for  mutual  defence 
and  protection,  ..... 

9,      Letter  from  Savannah,  to  a  Gentleman  of  Phila- 
delphia.     Meeting  at  Savannah,  on  the  8th. 
Georgia  will  unite  with  the  other  Colonies. 
Large  Donations  made  for  Sufferers  in  Boston, 
9,      Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Prince  William 
County,  Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation 
electee.     Resolutions  adopted  on  tire  21st  to 
enforce  the  Continental  Association, 
10,      Circular  from  the  Earl  of   Dartmouth  to  the 
Governours  of  the  several   Colonics.      The 
Resolution  of  Parliament  to  sustain  the  King 
in  carrying  into  execution  the  Laws  of  tho 
-fast  Session,  will  put  an  end  to  the  expecta- 
tions of  the  Colonies  of  receiving  support  in 
their  unwarrantable  pretensions, 


1026 
1026 

1774. 

Dec 

10, 

1026 

1026 

10. 

1027 

10. 

10, 

1027 


-  1028 
r 

-  1029 


-  1029 


-  1030 


-  1030 


1031 

1031 

1031 
1031 

1032 


-  1032 


-  1032 


1032 


1032 


1033 

1033 
1033 

1033 


1033 


1033 


1034 


12, 


12, 


12. 


12, 


12, 


13. 


13. 
14, 


14, 


1034 


14, 


16, 


16, 


Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieuten- 
ant Governour  Colden.  Does  not  think  the 
assistance  of  the  King's  Troops  to  quell^  the 
disturbances  at  Bennington,  under  the  Ne\y- 
Hampshire  Grants,  ought  to  be  called  for  until 
every  other  effort  has  been  foimd  insufficient; 
and  hopes  these  disputes  may  be  settled  without 
the  risk  of  bloodshed,  .... 
Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Ne\vtown,  in  Queen's 
County,  New- York.  Committee  of  Observa 
tion  appointed,  .  .  .  - 
Letter  from  London,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Advantages  to  the  Colonies  from  an 
union  with  England.  Parliament  cannot 
make  the  first  advances  towards  reconcilia- 
tion,   ■        " 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.     The  American  writers,  by  their  pro- 
tensions  to  Independence,  and  their  claims  to 
exemption  from  Taxation,  have    ruined  the 
cause,       ....--- 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  King  and  Queen 
County,  Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation 
appointed,  -         -         -         -         -         - 

Meeting  of  Henrico  County,  Virginia,  Commit- 
tee. The  Resolutions  of  Congress  to  be  con- 
sidered by  the  Committee  as  the  sole  rule  of 
their  conduct,  respecting  their  present  engage- 
ments. Committee  of  Correspondence  appoint- 
ed, ...-.-- 
Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Dan- 
bury,  in  Connecticut.  Resolutions  to  support 
the  Congress.  Committee  of  Observation  ap- 
pointed. The  Inhabitants  requested  to  contri- 
bute liberally.  Money  or  Provisions  for  Boston 

Sufferers, 

Letter  from  Boston  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- York. 
It  was  moved  on  the  10th  instant,  in  the  Pro- 
\incial  Congress,  that  Arms  be  immediately 
taken  up  against  the  King's  Troops;  a  Mem- 
ber stated  such  a  move  was  infamous,  as  the 
Members  knew  that  neither  Connecticut,  nor 
any  of  the  Southern  Colonies,  meant  to  op- 
pose his  Majesty's  Arms.     At  PljTiiouth  they 
are  now  beating  up  for  Volunteers  to  attack 
the  Troops,       ..---. 
Letter  from  Captain  Wallace  to  Vice  Admiral 
Graves,  dated  on  board  his  Majesty's  Ship 
Rose,  at  Newport,  Rhode- Island.    The  King's 
Cannon  upon  Fort- Island  carried  off  by  the 
Inhabitants,        ...--- 
Letter  from  Sir  James  Wright  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.   Attempt  to  raise  a  flame  again  in 
Georgia,  since  the  return  of  the  Carolina  Dele- 
gates from  the  Congress,  whose  Resolutions 
and  Proceedings  have  sanctioned  Rebellion, 
Letter  from  Arthur  Lee  to  Richard  Henry  Lee, 
Letter  from  Newport,  in  Rhode- Island,  to  a  Gen- 
tleman in  New- York.     The   People  there 
have  declared  themselves  openly  against  Gov- 
ernment.   The  Publick  Authorities  have  dis- 
mantled the  King's  Fort,  and  moved  the  Can- 
non and  Stores  to  Providence,      -         -         . 
Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  Governour 
Gage.      This  day  about  four  hundred  Men 
proceeded  to  his  Majesty's  Castle,  William  and 
Mary,  and  carried  off  by  violence  one  hundred 
barrels  of  Powder,  belonging  to  the  King ;  to- 
morrow, it  is  expected,  they  will  carry  off  the 
Cannon  and  Arms.    Tho  persons  who  took  the 
lead  in  this  enormity  are  well  kno\Mi, 
Letter    from  Captain  Cochran,  Commander   of 
Fort  William  and  Mary,  to  Governour  Went- 
worth.     Informs  him  of  the  storming  of  the 
Fort,  and  the  seizure  and  removal  of  the  Pow- 
der,   -        " 

Letter  from  Governour  Wentworth  to  Governour 
Gage.  Last  night  many  Cannon,  and  about 
sixty  Muskets,  were  taken  from  the  Fort. 
Portsmouth  is  full  of  armed  Men,  who  appear 
determined  to  dismantle  the  Fort  entirely. 
Letters  from  Portsmouth,  in  New- Hampshire,  to 
a  Gentleman  in  New- York.  Further  ac- 
counts of  the  seizure  of  the  Powder  and  Can- 
non at  Fort  William  and  Mary, 
Address  of  the  Council  of  Virginia  to  Govern- 
our Dunmore,  ... 
The  Govemour's  Answer,       -        -   - 


-  1035 


-  1035 


1035 


-  1036 


1037 


1037 


1038 


1039 


1039 


1040 
1040 


1041 


1041 


1042 


1042 


-  1043 

1043 
1044 


K 


1774. 

2>fc.  13,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Northampton 
County,  Virginia.  Committee  of  Observation 
appointed.  The  Association  to  be  considered 
the  sole  rule  of  the  Committee's  conduct  in 
every  emergency,        ....         -  1044 

Letter  from  the  People  of  Northampton  County, 
Virginia,  of  the  30th  August,  to  the  Coimnit- 
tee  of  Donations,  at  Boston,         ...  1044 

Reply  from  David  Jeffries,  of  the  Committee  of 
Donations,  Boston,  of  the  30th  of  September, 
to  John  Harmanson,  and  others,  of  Northamp. 
ton,  Virginia,      ......  1045 

15,  Letter  from   Governour   Gage  to  the  Earl  of 

Dartmouth, 1046 

16,  Committee  for  Caroline  County,  Virginia.      Re- 

commend to  the  People  of  the  County,  as  they 
would  avoid  being  considered  enemies  to  Ame- 
rican Liberty,  not  to  have  any  dealings  with 
certain  Merchants,  charged  with  violating  the 
Association,        -.-...  1047 

16,  Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  York  County,  Penn- 

sylvania. Committee  of  Observation  ap- 
pointed,      1048 

17,  Meeting  of  the    Freeholders  of  Charles   City 

County,  Virginia.    Committee  of  Observation 

appointed, 1049 

17,     Town  Meeting  at  Providence,  in  Rhode-Island. 

Committee  of  Correspondence  appointed,       -  1049 

17,  Letter   received  in    London  from  an  Officer  in 

Boston.  It  is  beheved,  from  certain  circum- 
stances, that  General  Gage  means  to  strike 
some  stroke  of  importance  soon,  which  the 
Americans  are  little  aware  of,       -         -         -  1049 

18,  Letter  from  Arthur  St.  Clair  to  Governour  Penn,  1050 

19,  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour  Bull  to  the 

Earl  of  Dartmouth,  ....  105O 

19,  Philadelphia  Committee  order  the  Association  of 
the  Butchers,  in  the  City  and  Suburbs  of  Phil- 
adelphia, to  be  printed,  ....  1050 
19,  Meeting  of  Committee  for  Fairfax  County,  Vir. 
ginia.  Irish  Linens  imported  in  the  Ship 
Hope,  from  Belfast,  directed  to  be  sold  agree, 
ably  to  the  Tenth  Article  of  Association,  -  1051 
19,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Observation,  for 
Gloucester  County,  Virginia.  Committee  of 
Correspondence  appoint^,  -         .         t  1051 

19,  Committee   of   Observation  for   Elizabethtovm, 

in  New-Jersey.  Resolution  relative  to  Riv- 
ington's  Gazette,         .....   1052 

20,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  of  New- 

York.  Efforts  of  the  Ministry  to  accomplish 
their  designs  on  the  Colonies,        ...  1052 

20,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Chester  Comity, 
Pennsylvania.  Committee  of  Observation  ap- 
pointed.     Provincial  Congress  recommended,   1052 

20t     United  Colonies  extremely  active  and  zealous  in 

the  common  cause,      .....  1053 

20,  Letter  from  a  Gentleman  in  Boston  to  Mr.  Riv- 

ington.  Account  of  the  proceedings  at  Ports- 
mouth, in  New. Hampshire,  and  the  capture  of 
Fort  William  and  Mary,      ....   1053 

21,  Meeting  of  Committee  for  Halifax  County,  North 

Carolina.  No  dealings  permitted  with  An- 
drew Miller,  who  has  refused  to  sign  the  Asso- 
ciation,       1055 

21,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  for  Prince  George's 

County,  Maryland.  Eight  hundred  and  thir- 
ty-three Pounds  to  be  raised  by  subscription, 
and  ten  Companies  to  be  enrolled  in  the  Coun- 
ty,   1056 

22,  Meeting  of  Freeholders  of  Orange  County,  Vir- 

ginia.   Committee  of  Observation  elected,      -  1056 

23,  Circular  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Corres- 

pondence of  Philadelphia,  to  the  Committee  of 
Inspection  of  the  several  Counties  in  Pennsyl- 
vania,       .--....  1056 
22,     Letter  from  Timothy  Ruggles  to  the  Printers  of 

the  Boston  Newspapers,      ....  1057 
Association  proposed  by  Mr.  Ruggles,  to  be  sign, 
ed  by  the  People  of  Massachusetts,  to  oppose 
the  Congress,  and  support  the  King,     -         -   1057 

22,  Letter  from  Arthur  Lee  to  Richard  Henry  Lee,   1058 

23,  Meeting  of  Inhabitants  of  Williamsburg,  in  Vir- 

ginia.    Committee  of  Observation  appointed,    1059 
23,     Meetmg  of  Freeholders  of  Accomack  County, 
in  Virginia.      Committee  of  Observation  ap- 
pointed,   1059 

23,     Meeting  of  Gentlemen,  Freeholders,  and  others, 

FOCETH  SeEIES. 


CONTENTS. 


LXXXII 


1774. 


of  St.  Mary's  County,  Maryland.      Commit- 
tees of  Observation  and  Correspondence,  and 
Delegates  to  the  Convention,  appointed,          -   1060 
Dec.23,  Meeting  of  Committee  for  Anne  Arundel  Coun- 
ty, Maryland, 1060 

24,  Committee  for  Anne  Arundel  County,  Maryland. 
Resolution  relating  to  Thomas  Charles  Wil- 
liams, and  Mr.  Williams's  acknowledgement,   1061 

24,  Letter  from  Governour  Dunmore  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  Every  County  in  Virginia  has 
its  Committee,  and  is,  besides,  raising  an  Inde- 
pendent Company,  for  the  avowed  purpose  of 
being  employed  against  Government,  if  occa- 
sion requires.  There  is  not  a  Justice  of  the 
Peace  in  Virginia  that  acts,  except  as  a  Com- 
mittee-man. The  Association  will  defeat  it- 
self The  Non-Exportation  Agreement  will 
produce  distress ;  and  Manufactures  cannot, 
advantageously,  be  carried  on  in  Virginia,     -  1062 

24,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  King's  District, 
Albany  County,  New- York.  Will,  at  the 
risk  of  their  lives,  suppress  every  Meeting, 
Association,  or  Combination,  which  may,  in 
any  wise,  obstruct  the  due  Administration  of 
Justice,  under  the  King,  in  the  Province,       -  1063 

24,  Address  from  "  A  Watchman,"  to  the  Inhabit- 
ants of  British  America,      -         .         -         .   1063 

24,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York,       1065 

24,  Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Member  of  the 
British  Parliament.  A  Manufactory  of  Gun- 
powder begun  in  Pennsylvania,  where  there 
are  Gunsmiths  enough  to  make  one  hundred 
thousand  Stand  of  Arms  in  a  year,        -         -   1066 

26,  Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Member  of  the 
British  Parliament.  The  Ministry  who  be- 
lieve the  military  preparations  in  the  Colonies 
have  been  recommended  and  taught  by  Gene- 
ral Lee,  are  entirely  mistaken.  The  Ameri- 
cans were  determined  to  seal  their  love  of  Li- 
berty with  their  blood,  long  before  they  heard 
the  name  of  that  Officer,     ....   1066 

26,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Vir- 
ginia. The  Petition  of  the  Congress  favour- 
ably received  in  England.  Lord  Chatham 
commends  both  the  Petition  and  the  other  Pro- 
ceedings in  the  highest  terms,      -         -         -  1 067 

26,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Virginia. 
The  universal  approbation  the  Proceedings  of 
the  Congress  meets  with  in  England,  has  dis- 
concerted the  Ministry,  who  appear  unwilling 
to  retract,  and  unable  to  proceed,  -         -   1067 

26,     Letter  from  Arthur  Lee  to  Richard  Henry  Lee,  1068 

26,  Letter  from  an  Officer  in  the  Army,  at  Boston,  to 
a  Gentleman  in  Edinburgh.  The  Army  is 
in  high  spirits,  and  the  Town  is  quiet.  "The 
back  settlements,  in  general,  disapprove  of  the 
Non-Importation  Resolves,  ...  1068 

26,     Letter  from  Governour  GSage  to  the   Earl  of 

Dartmouth, 1069 

26,  Proclamation  of  Governour  Wentworth,  for  ap- 

prehending and  bringing  to  condign  punish, 
ment  those  who  were  guilty  of  the  treason- 
able insults  and  outrages  at  his  Majesty's  Cas- 
tle, William  and  Mary,  on  the  14th  and  15th 
of  this  month,  .....   1069 

27,  Account  of  the  seizure  of  Powder  and  Arms,  at 

New.  York, 1070 

28,  Humble  Petition  and  Memorial  of  the  Assembly 

of  Jamaica,  to  the  King's  Most  Excellent  Ma- 
jesty, in  Council, 1072 

28,  Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  North  America,  in 

general,  and  those  of  the  Province  of  New- 
York,  in  particular,  in  defence  of  the  Con- 
gress,         1074 

29,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Fair-- 

field,  in  Connecticut.  Approve  the  Associa- 
tion, and  appoint  Committee  of  Observation. 
Committee  to  attend  a  County  Congress,  and  a 
Committee  of  Correspondence,  appointed,         -  1 075 

30,  Letter    from  Governour  Eden   to  the  Earl  of 

Dartmouth.  The  People  of  Maryland  will 
undergo  any  hardship,  rather  than  submit  to 
the  Tax  on  Tea ;  and  will  support  the  Asso- 
ciation, even  if  it  causes  the  total  ruin  of  their 

Trade, 1076 

30,  Meeting  at  Oyster  Bay,  in  Queen's  County, 
New- York,  called  to  choose  a  Committee. — 


UCXXIII 

1774. 


CONTENTS. 


LXXXIV 


The  Meeting  determined  to  be  illegal,  and  ad- 
joumed  without  transacting  any  business,        -   lOTo 
De«.30,  Letter    from  Joseph   Trumbull   to   Govemour 
Trumbull.     A  supply  of  Ammunition  should 
be  procured,  at  tlie  Colony's  expense,  as  early 
as  possible,         •         -         -         ■         "         "' 
30,     Mectijig  of  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants  of 
Boston.     Report  on  the  Letter  from  General 
Gage  to  Peyton  Randolph,  President  of  the 
Congress,  adopted,  and  to  be  forwarded  to  Mr. 
Randolph.     Thanks  to  the  Colonies,  for  their 
liberal  Donations.    Delegates  to  the  Provmcial 
Congress  appointed,  -         -         -         -   10/7 

30,  Letter  from  Thomas  Gushing  to  Josiah  Qumcy, 

Junior, ."   '0^0 

31,  Letter  from  a  Mercantile  House  at  Yorkshire,^  m 

England,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- York.  The 
Resolves  of  the  Congress  will  have  no  effect  in 
England.  Parliament  cannot  take  notice  of 
them.  Manidactures  in  England  in  a  flour- 
ishing condition,  and  Trade  scarcely  ever  so 
goodVfore, '080 

3 1 ,  Letter  from  Govemour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. A  general  disposition  every  where  to 
adhere  to  the  Resolutions  of  the  Congress.  In 
Philadelphia  the  Committees  have  undertaken 
to  regulate  the  disposition  of  all  British  Goods 
imported  since  the  first  of  December,     -         -   1081 

3 1 .  Lihabitants  of  Maryland  forming  Military  Com- 
panies,      ...•'•.•■-  1081 

1775.  ^  ^ 

Jan.  2,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Richmond  Coun- 
ty, Virginia.  Delegates  to  the  Colony  Con- 
gress appointed.    Instructions  to  the  Delegates,  1021 

2,  Meeting  of  Inhabitants  of  Charles  County,  Mary- 

land. Delegates  to  the  Convention,  and  Com- 
irdttees  for  general  Subscription  in  each  Coun- 
ty, appointed.  Members  added  to  the  Commit- 
tee of  Observation,       -         -         -         -         -  1081 

3,  Meeting  of  the  West  India  Merchants,  in  Lon- 

don.     Letter  from   the   Planters.       General 
Meeting  of  Merchants  and  Planters  called,     -   1082 
3,      Letter  from   London   to  a   Merchant  in  New- 
York.      Proceedings    of  the    Congress  has 
alarmed  Lord  North,         ...        -  1083 

3.  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Middlesex  Coun- 

ty, New-Jersey.      Committees  of  Observation, 
for  the  several  Districts  of  the  County,  ap- 
pointed, -        -        -        -        -        -  1083 

16,  Meeting  of  the  General  Committee  of  Observa- 
tion for  Middlesex  County,  New- Jersey.  Pro- 
ceedings of  the  Congress  approved.  Commit- 
tee of  Correspondence  appointed.  Ministerial 
writers  endeavouring  to  effect  a  disunion  of  the 
Colonies,  condemned,  ....   1083 

4,  Circular  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to 

the  Governours  of  the  several  Colonies,  direct- 
ing them  to  use  their  utmost  endeavours  to  pre- 
vent the  appointment  of  Deputies  to  the  Con- 
gress, in  May  next,      ....         -   1085 

4,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  The  Manufacturing  Counties  begin  to 
suffer,       ,....-.  1085 

4,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Virginia. 
Meetings  of  Merchants  and  Planters.  The 
West  India  Planters  fear  ruin,  if  the  American 
Acts  are  not  repealed,  ....   1085 

4,  Meeting  of  the  Merchants  and  others  concerned 
in  the  American  Commerce,  at  the  King's 
Arms  Tavern,  London,  ....  1086 
Speech  intended  to  have  been  spoken  at  the 
Meeting  of  the  North  American  Merchants, 
at  the  King's  Arms  Tavern,         ...   1087 

6,  Letter  from  London.  Account  of  the  Meeting  of 
the  Amciican  Merchants,  at  the  King's  Arms 
Tavern,     -- 1087 

9,  Letter  from  Leeds  to  the  Printer  of  the  London 
Evening  Post,  contradicting  the  representa- 
tions in  a  Letter  from  Leeds,  referred  to  by  Mr. 
Barclay,  at  the  Meeting,  on  the  4th,       -         -   1088 

16,  Letter  from  David  Barclay,  enclosing  the  Letter 
from  Leeds,  referred  to  by  him  at  the  Meeting, 
on  the  4th,         ,...,.  1089 

21,  Letter  from  Samuel  Elam,  at  Leeds,  avowing 
himself  the  writer  of  the  Letter  to  Mr.  Bar- 
clay, and  sustaining  the  representations  there 
made,  of  the  effects  of  the  American  Associa- 
tion on  British  Manufactures,        .        ,        ,  ^089 


'^''''  Letter  from  Manchester  to  a  Merchant  in  London, 
enclosing  a  copy  of  a  Letter  from  a  Merchant 
in  New- York,  countermanding  orders  for 
Goods, -        -  1091 

Jan.  4,  Meeting  of  Committee  for  Charles  City  County, 
Virginia.      Direct  the  sale  of  Goods  recently 
imported,  ......   1091 

4,  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Govemour  Golden  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth.  If  he  finds  there  is  not 
a  majority  of  the  Assembly,  which  meets  on  the 
1 1th,  in  favour  of  prudent  measures,  will  pro- 
rogue them.  There  is  still  a  majority  of  the 
respectable  people  in  the  City,  who  promote 
peace  and  discountenance  violence,         -         -   1092 

4,  Town  Meeting  at  Barnstable,  in  Massachusetts. 

Refuse  to  purchase  Arms  or  Ammunition,  en- 
courage Minute  Men,  or  send  Delegates  to  the 
Provincial  Congress,  ....   1092 

5,  An  Epistle  from  the  Meeting  of  Sufferings  of  the 

Quakers,  held  in  Philadelphia,  for  Pennsylva- 
nia and  New- Jersey,  ....   1093 

5,  Address  from  a  FreehoWer  of  Essex,  in  New- 
Jersey,  to  the  Committee  of  Essex  County, 
condemning  the  Resolutions  of  Congress,       -   1094 

5,      Reply  to  the  Address  to  the  People  of  New- Jer- 
sey, dated  November  19th,  -         -         -   1096 
Address  of  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 
Albany,  in  New- York,  to  the  Publick,  -  1097 

5,  Letter  from  the  Albany  to  the  New- York  Dele- 
gates in  the  Continental  Congress,         -         -  1098 

5,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence,  at 

Newport,  in  Rhode- Island,  to  the  Philadelphia 
Committee.  The  Association  strictly  adhered 
to  by  the  Merchants  of  the  Colony,       -         -   1098 

6,  Letters  at  CharlcstowTi,  from  West  Florida,  with 

information  of  the  state  of  Indian  affairs  there,   1099 
6,      Meeting  of  Freeholders   of  several    Towns  in 
Ulster  County,  New- York.    Approve  the  As- 
sociation, and  all  the  other  measures,  of  the  late 
Congress,  -        -        -        -        -        .1100 

6,  Letter  from  the  Boston  Committee  of  Donations, 
to  the  Philadelphia  Committee,     -         -         -  1 100 

7,  Letter  from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieutenant 
Govemour  Coldcn.  The  affairs  of  the  Colo- 
nies have  come  to  a  crisis,  and  will  be  taken 
up  by  Parliament  immediately  after  the  holi- 
days,   1101 

Memorial  of  Colonel  Thomas  Ord,  for  a  location 
of  five  thousand  acres  of  Land  in  New- York, 
for  his  services,  enclosed  in  the  foregoing 
Letter,       - 1101 

7,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  The  Resolves  of  Congress  have  pushed 
matters  to  an  extremity,  and  render  a  complete 
decision  of  the  dispute  inevitable.  The  ques- 
tion now  is.  Whether  America  shall  be  inde- 
pendent of,  or  subordinate  to,  the  Parliament,  1101 

7,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Woodbridge,  in 
Middlesex  County,  New- Jersey.  Committee 
of  Observation  appointed.  Determination  to 
carry  into  effect  the  Association,  -         -   1102 

9,  Letter  from  a  Merchant  in  London  to  a  friend  in  '  • 
Virginia.  There  is  no  disposition  in  the  Cabi- 
net to  give  America  any  redress.  The  Colo- 
nies should  preserve  their  union,  and  provide 
themselves  with  Manufactures,  Arms,  and  Am- 
munition, for  it  is  more  than  probable  they  will 
have  occasion  for  them,        -         .         -         -   1104 

9,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Epsom,  in  New- 
Hampshire.  Pedlars  to  be  tarred  and  feather- 
ed, and  forfeit  their  Goods,  ...     1105 

2,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Exeter,  in  New- 
Hampshire.  Unanimously  adopt  the  Associa- 
tion, appoint  Committee  of  Observation,  and 
Delegates  to  the  Convention,  to  meet  on  the 
25th,  -         -         -    -    -         -         -         -   1105 

9,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Morris  County, 
New- Jersey.  Unanimously  agree  to  abide  by 
the  Association.  Order  the  election  of  Commit- 
tees of  Observation  by  each  Township  of  the 
County,  and  elect  a  new  Committee  of  Corres- 
pondence. Rivington  declared  an  enemy  to 
tlie  Country,  and  his  Newspaper  to  be  discoun- 
tenanced for  the  future,         -         -         -         -  11 06 

9,  Letter  from  Samuel  Adams  to  the  Committee  ap- 
pointed in  New- York  to  receive  and  transmit 
Donations  for  the  relief  of  the  sufferers  in  Bos- 
toijj  -        •        -.        -        -        -        -  1105 


LXXXV    I 

1775. 

Jan.  1 1,  Meeting  of  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others,  con- 
cerned in  the  American  Commerce,  at  the 
King's  Arms  Tavern,  London.  Petitions  to 
Parliament  adopted,  and  ordered  to  be  pre- 
sented, .-.---. 
A  circumstantial  account  of  the  Proceedings  of 
the  North  American  Merchants,  held  at  the 
King's  Arms  Tavern,  Cornhill,  London, 


CONTENTS, 


LXXXVI 


1775. 


1107 


-  1107 


PROVINCIAL  CONGRESS  OF  SOCTH  CAROLINA. 

Jan.  1 1,  List  of  the  Members  of  the  Congress, 

Charles  Pinckney  chosen  President, 

American  Bill  of  Rights,  as  declared  by  the  Con- 
tinental Congress,  approved. 

Reasons  assigned  for  not  stating  all  the  Griev- 
ances, (NotP,)     ------ 

The  Association  approved,       -         -         -         . 

Debates  on  agreeing  to  the  Association,  (Note,) 

Thanks  to  the  Continental  Congress,  for  their 
wise  and  spirited  exertions  in  behalf  of  Ameri- 
can Liberty,       ...... 

No  action  for  any  Debt  to  be  commenced,  except 
in  certain  cases,  without  the  consent  of  the 
Committee  of  the  District  where  the  defendant 
resides,  until  it  shall  be  otherwise  ordered  by 
the  Provincial  Congress,      .         .         -         . 

Committees  for  the  several  Districts  and  Parish- 
es, for  carrying  into  execution  the  Association, 
and  for  determining  upon  applications  relative 
to  law  processes,  ..... 

Regulations  in  relation  to  Rice,  if  the  exporta- 
tion shall  be  continued  after  the  10th  of  Septem- 
ber next,  ...... 

Committees  for  exchanging  Rice  for  other  com. 
modifies,  ...... 

The  raising  of  Cotton,  Hemp,  Flour,  Wool,  Bar 
ley,  and  Hops,  reconrniended, 

Publick  Storekeepers  to  be  appointed  to  receive 
and  sell  Wool,  and  the  Linen,  Woollen,  and 
Cotton  Manufactures  of  the  Colony, 

The  present  Provincial  Congress  to  continue  un- 
til the  next  General  Meeting  of  the  Inhabit- 
ants, ....... 

The  Parochial  and  District  Committees  requested 
to  use  their  utmost  endeavours  to  obtain  liberal 
Donations  for  the  relief  of  the  suffering  People 
of  Boston,  ...... 

Deputies  to  the  American  Congress,  to  meet  on 
the  10th  of  May  next,  appointed, 

Address  to  Lieutenant  Governour  Bull,  complain- 
ing of  the  long  and  still  continued  disuse  of 
General  Assemblies,  .... 

Answer  of  the  Lieutenant  Governour, 

Inhabitants  of  the  Colony  recommended  to  be 
diligently  attentive  in  learning  the  use  of 
Arms,        ...... 

Friday,  the  17th  of  February,  set  apart  as  a  day 
of  Fasting,  Humiliation,  and  Prayer,  and  Min. 
isters  of  the  Gospel  throughout  the  Colony 
requested  to  deliver  suitable  Discourses  on  the 
occasion,  ..... 


1109 
1110 

-  1110 

1111 
1111 
1111 


1112 


1113 


1113 


1114 
1116 


-  IIIG 


-  IllG 


GENERAL  ASSEMBLY  OF  NEW-JERSEY. 

/aw.  11,  Meeting  of  the  Council, 
13, 


The    Governour    delivered    a   Speech   to   both 
Houses,     ...... 

18,     Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  in  answer  to 
the  Governour's  Speech,      .         .         .         . 

24,     Address  reported,  amended,  and  agreed  to, 
26,     Address  presented  to  the  Governour, 

Governour's  Answer,     .         -         -         .         . 
JFkJ.  10,  Proceedings  on  the  case  of  a  Challenge  from 
James  Murdock  to  Lord  Stirling, 
13,     Adjourned  to  March  14th,       .        .        .        . 


1116 


1116 
1116 


1117 
1118 


-   1118 


■  1118 


1117 

-  1117 

1117 
1118 
1119 
1119 


1120 
1121 


/an.  11,  The  Assembly  meets,     -        -        .        .        .  1121 
List  of  the  Representatives,     -         .         -         .1121 
Speech  of  the  Governour  to  the  Council  and 

Assembly,          ......  1121 

Governour's  Speech  read  and  committed  to  Com- 
mittee of  the  Whole  House,          ...  1123 
House  in  Committee  on  the  Governour's  Speech,  1123 
Speech  further  considered  in  Committee,             -  1123 
Further  considered,          .....  1123 

Further  considered, 1123 

Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  in  answer  to 

the  Speech, 1124 


13, 

16, 

17, 
20, 
21, 
23, 


Committee  to  bring  in  a  Bill  for  the  Support  of 
Government,      ...... 

/a«.24.  Proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress,  com 
municated  to  the  House  by  the  Delegates, 

Proceedings  of  the  Congress  unanimously  ap- 
proved,     ---.... 

Delegates  to  the  Congress  to  meet  in  May  next, 
appointed,  ---... 

The  Delegates  instructed  to  Disagree  to  any  Pro- 
position in  the  Congress  to  give  some  Colonies 
more  Votes  in  the  determination  of  Questions 
to  bind  the  whole,  than  to  others, 
25,  Governour's  Speech  further  considered  in  Com- 
mittee,      ----... 

Committee  to  prepare  a  Petition  to  the  King, 
praying  a  redress  of  Grievances, 
27,     Bill  for  Support  of  Government,  read,  and  second 
reading  ordered,  .... 

30,  Address  to  the  Governour  read,  and  second  read' 

ing  ordered,        .         .         .         .         .    ^    . 

31,  Message  from  the  Governour,  wth  a  Letter  from 

Colonel  Robertson,  requesting  to  be  allowed 
for  Sheets  furnished  the  King's  Troops, 

Address  to  the  Governour  read  a  second  time,  con- 
sidered in  Committee  of  the  Whole,  amended, 
and  agreed  to,  - 
Feb.  3,  Petition  from  a  number  of  Inhabitants  of  Not- 
tingham, in  Burlington  County,  praying  some 
measures  may  be  taken  to  settle  the  Disputes 
between  Great  Britain  and  the  Colonies, 

Address  of  the  House  presented  to  the  Govern- 
our, ....... 

Answer  of  the  Governour,      .... 

6,  Proceedings  on  the  Bill  for  the  Support  of  Gov. 

ernment,  ...... 

7,  Governour's  Message,  received  on  the   31st  of 

January,  considered.  Refuse  to  allow  Colo- 
nel Robertson's  charge  of  three  hundred  and 
fifty-four  Pounds,  seven  Shillings  and  six 
Pence,  for  Sheets  furnished  the  King's  Troops 
in  this  Colony,  ,;.... 

8,  Petition  from  the  Inhabitants  of  Nottingham  re. 

ferred  to  the  Committee  appointed  to  prepare 
an  Address  to  the  King,       .... 

10,  Proceedings  in  regard  to  James  Murdock,  for 

Challenging  a  Member  of  the  House, 

11,  Petition  to  the  King  reported  and  considered  in 

Committee,         *».»». 
13,     Further  considered  in  Committee,  agreed  to,  and 

ordered  to  be  signed  by  the  Speaker, 
Speaker  permitted  to  enter  his  Dissent  to  the  Peti^ 

tion,  on  the  Journals  of  the  House, 
Adjourned  to  March  14th,  then  to  meet  at  Bur^ 

lington,     ....... 


1124 


-  1124 


-  1124 
1124 


1124 


1124 


-  1125 
d 

-  1125 


1125 


-  1125 


-  1125 


-  1126 

1126 
1127 

1127 


1129 


1130 
1131 


1131 


-  1132 
1134 


1134 


CORRESPONDENCE, 


PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Jaw.  11,  Letter  from  Connecticut  to  a  Gentleman  at  New- 
port, in  Rhode-Island.  The  whole  Militia  of 
the  Colony  ordered  to  train,  and  a  quantity  of 
Powder  and  Lead  to  be  provided.  The  time 
is  near  when  we  must  gird  on  our  Swords ;  the 
united  Forces  of  America  will  be  able  to 
withstand  all  the  Troops  England  can  spare,      1 134 

12,  Resolutions  adopted  by  the  Committee  of  Darien, 

in  Georgia,         ......  1135 

Association  of  the  Freemen,  Freeholders,  and  In- 
habitants of  the  Province  of  Georgia,  -  1136 

13,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Charlotte  County, 

Virginia.  Committee  of  Observation  appointed. 
Proceedings  of  the  Committee,  -  -  -  II 38 
13,  Letter  from  Hartford,  in  Connecticut,  to  a  Gen- 
tleman at  New- York.  The  Governour  and 
Council  met  on  the  4th,  and  have  ordered  Pow- 
der and  Lead  to  be  purchased  at  the  publick 
expense ;  and  the  Militia  is  mustered  every 
week.  Nothing  but  a  spirit  of  Independence 
would  suffer  matters  to  be  carried  to  such  ex- 
tremities, ..... 

15,  Letter  from  Bristol,  in  England,  to  a  Gentleman 

in  New- York,  ..... 

16,  Meeting  of  the   Inhabitants  of  Anne  Arundel 

County,  Maryland,  Committee  of  Observa- 
tion appointed.  The  Committee  authorized  to 
elect  Delegates  for  the  County  to  the  Provin- 
cial Congress,  and  to  nominate  a  Committee 
of  Correspondence.  Every  person  in  the 
County  who  shall  refuse  to  contribute  for  the 


-   1139 


1139 


LXXXVII 


1775. 


CONTENTS. 


LXXXVIII 


-  1140 


1141 


purchase  of  Arms  and  Ammunition,  shall  be 
considered  an  enemy  to  America, 

Objections  to  the  Proceedings  of  this  Meeting, 

(Note,) -         - 

/«».16,Meeting  of  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants  of 
Prince  George's  County,  Maryland.  Mem- 
bers added  to  the  Committee  of  Inspection,  and 
to  the  Committee  of  Corrrspondt nee.  Dele- 
gates to  the  Provincial  Congress  appointetl,  - 
16,  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Baltimore  County, 
Maryland.  Proceedings  of  the  late  Provin- 
cial Convention,  approved. 

Delegates  to  the  next  Provincial  Congress  ap- 
pointed,    -        -        -        -        -        -        ■ 

Members  added  to  the  Committee  of  Observation, 

Name  of  every  person  refusing  to  subscribe  for 
the  purchase  of  Arms  and  Ammmiition  to  be 
returned  to  the  Committee,  -         -         - 

Forming  the  Inhabitants  into  Military  Companies, 
and  resisting  with  force,  illegal  attempts  upon 
their  Property,  not  repugnant  to  the  Oaths  of 
Allegiance,         ------ 

Subscriptions  to  be  opened  throughout  the  County 
to  supply  the  necessities  of  the  Suflerers  at 
Boston,     ------- 

Committee  to  purchase  Powder  and  Lead, 
16,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Bucks  County, 
Pennsylvania.  Approve  the  Proceedings  of 
the  Congress.  Agree  to  support  the  Associa- 
tion. Recommend  raising  Money  for  sup- 
port of  Poor  Inhabitants  of  Boston ;  and  ap- 
point Committee  of  Correspondence, 

16,  Committee  of  Berks  County,  in  Pennsylvania. 

Recommend  the  Inhabitants  of  the  County  not 
to  sell  Sheep  to  Butchers,  preserving  the  Wool, 
being  of  the  greatest  consequence, 

17,  Meeting  of  the  Supporters  of  the  Bill  of  Rights, 

in  London.      Members  of   the  Society  who 
have  seats  in  Parliament,  requested  to  exert 
themselves  in  bringing  to  justice  the  advisers 
of   the  measures  for  establishing   Arbitrary 
Government  in  the  Colonies,        -        -        -  1145 
17,      Meeting  of  the  Committee  for  Fairfax  County, 
Virginia.   Ammunition  should  be  immediately 
provided;  and  the  Inhabitants  of  the  County 
requested  to  form  themselves  into   Military 
Companies,        ------  1145 

Association  proposed  for  the  Inhabitants  of  Fair- 
fax Coimty,        ------  1145 

Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Observation  for  Bal- 
timore County,  Maryland.  Charges  against 
the  Rev.  William  Edmiston,  -  -  -  1146 
Meeting  of  the  West  India  Merchants  and  Plan- 
ters, in  London,  assembled  to  deliberate  on  the 
measures  necessary  to  be  pursued  on  this  very 
unportant  crisis, 1147 


1142 


-  1142 

1143 
1143 


1143 


1143 


1143 
1143 


1144 


1144 


17, 


18, 


GENERAL  ASSEMBLY  OF  GEORGIA. 

Ja».18,  Meeting  of  the  Assembly,        -        .        -        .  1152 
Speech  of  Giovernour  Wright  to  both  Houses,       1 152 
Alessage  from  the  Upper  House  to  the  Commons,  1 153 
20,      Address  of  the  Upper  House  of  Assembly  to  the 

Governour,        -        -        -        -        -        -1154 

Answer  of  the  Governour,      -        -        -        -  1155 

Address  of  the  Commons  House  of  Assembly  to 
the  Giovernour,  -         .         .         .         .   II55 

Governour's  Answer,     -----   1156 

Resolutions  Declaratory  of  the  Rights  of  the 
Colonies,  ------  1156 

.(Association  entered  into  by  the  Provincial  Con- 
gress of  Georgia,  assembled  in  Savannah,  on 
the  1 8th  of  January,  and  subscribed  by  forty- 
five  Deputies,  on  the  23d,  \vhen  they  chose 
Noble  Wimberly  Jones,  Archibald  Bullock, 
and  John  Houston,  Delegates  to  represent  that 
Colony  in  the  Continental  Congress  to  be  held 

in  May  next, 1158 

Letter  from  Georgia,  datetl  February  18th,  to  a 
Gentleman  in  New- York.  Proceedings  of  the 
Assembly,  and  of  the  Continental  Congress,  1160 
Committee  for  St.  John's  Parish,  Georgia,  at 
Charlestown,  on  the  23d  of  February,  to  wait 
on  the  General  Committee  there,  -         -   1161 

Letter  from  Lyman  Hall,  Chairman  of  a  Meet- 
ing held  in  St.  John's  Parish,  Georgia,  dated 
February  9,  to  the  Committee  of  Correspond- 
ence of  Charlestown,  in  South  Carolina,         -   1161 


1775. 

Jan:20.  Message  from  the  Committee  of  St.  John's  Pa- 
rish, to  the  Committes  of  the  several  Parishes 
of  Georgia,  in  Congress,  on  the  18th  of  Janua- 
ry,   

Another  Message  to  the  Committees  of  the  seve- 
ral Parishes  in  Congress  met,  on  the  20th, 

Answer  of  the  Parishes  met  in  Congress  to  the 
St.  John's  Committee,  .         .         -         . 

Resolutions  of  the  St.  John's  Committee, 

Resolution  of  the  General  Committee  at  Charles- 
town,  South  Carolina,  of  February  8th.  Will 
have  no  Trade,  Commerce,  Dealings,  or  In- 
tercourse, with  the  Colony  of  Georgia, 

Chairman  of  the  General  Committee  at  Charles- 
town  directed,  on  the  24th  of  February,  to 
write  to  the  Committee  of  the  Parish  of  St. 
John,  in  reply  to  their  Letter  of  the  9th  inst., 
that  they  cannot  trade  with  them ;  and  refer 
them  to  the  Continental  Congress, 


1162 

1162 

1162 
1162 


1163 


-  1163 


19. 


CORRESPONDENCE,  PROCEEDINGS,  ETC. 

Jan.  18,  Meeting  of  the  several  Township  Committees  of 
Hunterdon  County,  New-Jersey.  Approve 
the  Association  of  the  Continental  Congress, 
and  appoint  a  Committee  of  Correspondence, 

Association  signed  by  a  number  of  the  Inhabit- 
ants of  Dutchess  County,  New- York.  No 
leg;al  authority  in  America,  but  what  is  derived 
from  the  King.  They  will  defend  themselves 
whenever  attacked  on  any  pretence  not  war- 
ranted by  the  Laws  of  the  Land :  They  will  on 
all  occasions  exercise  all  their  rights  under  the 
Laws  of  the  Land,  notwithstanding  the  Asso- 
ciation of  the  Continental  Congress ;  and  will 
enforce  obedience  to  the  authority  of  the  King, 
whenever  called  upon  to  do  so,      - 

Letter  from  Montreal.     Parties  in  Canada, 

Letter  from  Shrewsbury,  New- Jersey,  to  a  Gen- 
tleman in  New- York.  At  a  meeting  of  Free- 
holders, on  the  17th,  it  was  determined  that  the 
appointment  of  a  Committee  was  not  only  use- 
less, but  would  disturb  the  peace  and  quiet  of 
the  Township,  .         .         .         - 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Fincastle  Coun- 
ty, Virginia.  The  Association  of  the  Conti- 
nental Congress  approved  and  subscribed,  and 
a  Committee  of  Observation  appointed. 

Address  of  the  People  of  Fincastle  County,  Vir- 
ginia, to  the  Delegates  from  that  Colony,  who 
attended  the  Continental  Congress, 

Address  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence 
of  Jamaica,  in  Queen's  County,  to  the  Dele- 
gates who  represented  New- York  in  the  late 
Continental  Congress,  .... 

Answer  of  the  Delegates,         -         -         -         - 

Letter  from  Massachusetts  Bay  to  a  Gentleman 
in  London.  The  Colonies  will  submit  to  no 
terms  without  a  restoration  of  their  rights ; 
England  cannot  dragoon  them  out  of  their  Li- 
berties. The  Congress  have  drawn  a  constitu- 
tional line  :  they  have  claimed  exclusive  juris- 
diction over  all  internal  concerns,  and  have  left 
Great  Britain  the  sovereignty  of  the  Ocean, 

Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Charles  County, 
Maryland.  No  further  restraints  to  be  laid  uj)- 
on  the  bringing  of  suits  at  law,  than  is  done 
by  the  last  Provincial  Convention, 

Proclamation  of  Governour  Dunmore.  Peace 
with  the  Shawancse,  who  have  agreed  not  to 
hunt  on  this  side  the  Ohio,  nor  to  molest  pas- 
sengers on  that  River,  -         -         . 

Proceedings  of  the  Convention  for  the  Province 
of  Pennsylvania,  held  at  Philadelphia,  Janua- 
ry 23d,  and  continued  by  adjournments,  until 
the  2Sth,  

List  of  the  Members,      -         -         -         -         - 

The  City  Committee  and  each  Coimty  Commit- 
tee to  have  one  vote  in  determining  every  ques- 
tion, ....... 

Proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress  ap- 
proved,     --..--- 

Members  of  the  Assembly  to  be  instructed  to 
procure  a  Law  prohibiting  the  importation  of 
Slaves  into  tlie  Province,      .         .         , 

In  case  the  Trade  of  Philadelphia  shall  be  sus- 
pended, in  the  present  struggle,  assistance  to  be 
given  to  the  Inhabitants  of  die  City, 


18. 
i8. 


20, 


20, 


19, 


21, 


21, 


23, 


23, 


1163 


1164 
11G4 


-  1165 


1163 


-  1165 


1166 
1167 


1167 


11G3 


-   1169 


1169 
1169 


1170 


1170 


-   1170 


1170 


LXXXIX 


CONTENTS. 


1775. 

/fflzi.23,  In  case  of  opposition  to  any  of  the  Committees, 
in  carrying  the  Continental  Association  into 
effect,  to  be  assisted  by  other  Committees,  -  1 170 
If  the  British  Government  shall  determine  to  ef- 
fect a  submission  to  the  late  Acts  of  Parliament 
by  force,  it  is  the  indispensable  duty  of  the  Peo- 
ple to  resist,  and  at  every  hazard,  to  defend  the 
Rights  and  Liberties  of  America,  -         -  1171 

After  the  first  of  March  next,  no  Sheep  under 

four  years  old,  to  be  killed,  -         -         -  1171 

Betting  up  of  Woollen  Manufactures,  in  as  many 

different  branches  as  possible,  recommended,       1171 
Raising  and  manufacturing  of  Madder,  Woad, 
and  other   Dye  Stuffs,  necessary  in  Woollen 
Manufactures,  recommended,         -         -         -  1171 
Extended  cultivation  of  Flax  and  Hemp,  recom- 
mended,      1171 

Making  Salt,  Saltpetre,  and  Gunpowder,  recom- 
mended,      1171 

Manufacturing  of  Copper,  Tin,  and  Iron,  and 
making  Steel,  Paper,  Glass,  and  Wool  Combs, 
recommended,  .....  1171 

Printing  Types  made  at  Germantown,  recom- 
mended to  be  used  by  the  Printers,  in  prefer- 
ence to  imported  Types,        -         -         -         -   1 172 

Cultivation  of  Barley  for  Malt  Liquors  recom- 
mended, to  render  less  necessary  the  consump- 
of  Foreign  Liquors,  ....   1172 

American  Manufactures  to  be  used  in  prefer- 
ence to  all  others,        -         -         -         -         -  1 172 

Societies  to  be  established,  and  Premiums  award- 
ed, for  the  encouragement  of  Manufactures,    -   1 172 
Any  Manufacturer  or  Vender  of  Goods,  who  shall 
sell  at  extravagant  prices,  to  be  advertised  as 
an  enemy  to  his  Country,     -         -         -         -  1 172 

Committee  of  Philadelpliia  appointed  a  Standing 
Committee  of  Correspondence,     -         -         -  1172 
20,     Letter  from  Samuel  Adams,  Chairman  of  the 
Committee  to  receive  Donations  for  the  Suf- 
ferers in  Boston,         -        -        -        -         -  1172 

24,     Letter  from  Connecticut  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.     People  are  preparing  for  the  worst ; 
a  Park  of  forty  pieces  of  Cannon  may  be  form- 
ed in  the  Spring,  and  our  Army  will  be  pretty 
expert  in  most  of  the  manceuvres,  -         -  1173 

24,     Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Frederick  County, 
Maryland.     Association  and  Resolves  of  the 
Congress,  and  Proceedings  of  Convention  ap- 
proved. Committees  of  Observation  and  of  Cor- 
respondence appointed.     Committees  through- 
out the  County  appointed  to  receive  contribu- 
tions for  purchase  of  Arms  and  Ammunition, 
and  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  author- 
ized to  contract  for  any  quantity  of  Powder 
and  Lead,  -         -         -         -         -         -1173 

24,  The  Testimony  of  the  Quakers,  given  forth  by  a 
Meeting  of  the  Representatives  of  said  People, 
in   Pennsylvania  and   New-Jersey,  held   at 

Philadelphia, 1176 

24,  Letter  from  Connecticut  to  a  Gentleman  of  New- 
York.  Preparations  of  the  Governour  and 
Council  to  supply  the  Colony  with  Ammuni- 
tion and  Arms,  -         .         -         .         .   1177 

24,  Letter  from  Marshfield  to  a  Gentleman  in  Bos- 

ton. Troops  sent  by  General  Gage  to  Marsh- 
field,  to  preserve  the  peace,  at  the  request  of  the 
Loyalists  of  that  place,  7  -  -  -  1177 
26,  Letter  from  Boston  to  a  Gentleman  of  New- York. 
A  number  of  the  principal  Inhabitants  of 
Marshfield  having  signed  General  lluggles's 
Association  against  the  Liberty  Plan,  the  Fac- 
tion at  Plymouth  threatened  to  make  them 
recant,  or  drive  them  off  their  Farms :  General 
Gage  sent  Troops  to  protect  them,  and  there 
has  yet  been  no  appearance  of  the  Plymouth 
Rebels,     ------ 

25,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Northumberland 

County,  Virginia.  Persons  published  in  the 
Gazette  for  Gambling,  in  violation  of  the  Ame- 
rican Continental  Association,  ... 
Ja7s.25,  Meeting  of  the  Council  of  Pennsylvania, 

Affidavit  of  Samuel  Whitcsill,  Keeper  of  the  Jail 
of  Westmoreland  County.  Jail  attacked,  and 
Prisoners  released  by  Major  Cormolly,  on  the 
24th  of  December, 1179 

Proclamation  of  John  Connolly,  dated  Fort  Dun- 
more,  December  30.  Forbids  the  payment  of 
Ta.xes  to  Collectors  appointed  by  Pennsylva- 


-  1178 


1170 
1179 


1775. 
Jan.25, 

25, 


1179 
-  1180 


nia,  and  authorizes  the  seizure  of  all  persons 
who  may  attempt  to  enforce  the  collection,     - 

William  Crawford,  President  of  the  Court,  in 
Westmoreland  County,  superseded  by  the 
Governour  and  Council  of  Pennsylvania,  for 
joining  with  the  Government  of  Virginia,  in 
opposing  the  jurisdiction  of  Pennsylvania,  in 
that  County,      --.... 

Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Gentleman  in 
New- York.  The  Addresses  to  Governour  Col- 
den  has  had  a  great  effect  in  Pennsylvania  : 
the  New- York  Assembly  is  revered  there  by 
all  sensible  men,  for  their  undaunted  resolu- 
tion in  first  making  a  stand  against  lawless 
usurpers  of  Power,  and  violators  of  Liberty. 
The  Assembly  of  Pennsylvania  will,  it  is 
hoped,  rescind  their  approbation  of  the  Pro- 
ceedings of  Congress,  -         -         -         -  1180 

25,  Convention  of  Deputies  appointed  by  the  several 

Towns  in  the  Province  of  New-Hampshire, 

held  at  Exeter, 1180 

Approve  the  Proceedings  of  Congress,      -         -  1180 
Appoint  Delegates  to  represent  the  Province  in 
the  Continental  Congress,  to  be  held  in  May 

next, 1181 

Committee  to  call  a  Provincial  Convention  of 

Deputies  when  they  shall  think  it  expedient,     1181 
Committee  of  Correspondence  appointed,  -  1181 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Province,         -  1 181 

26,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Pittsylvania  Coun- 

ty, Virginia.  Committee  for  enforcing  and 
putting  in  execution  the  Continental  Associa- 
tion, appointed,  -         -         .         -         -  1 182 

26,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
the  Precinct  of  Shawangunk,  in  Ulster  Coun- 
ty, New- York.  Approve  of  the  Continental 
Association.  The  Pamphlet,  "  Free  Thoughts 
on  the  Resolves  of  the  Congress,"  burnt,         -  1183 

26,  Address  to  the  People  of  America.  The  leaders 
in  the  Colonies  aim  at  Lidependence.  The 
consequences  of  their  obtaining  an  Indepen- 
dent Republick  considered,  .         .         .  1 1 83 

26,  Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  An- 

napolis.     A  motion  made  in  the  Assembly  of 

New- York,  this  day,  for  examining  the  Pro- 

_      ceedings  of  the  Congress,  was  thrown  out,     -   1188 

T.Hemarks  on  the  vote  in  the  Assembly  of  New- 

o8jI   --      York,  against  taking  into  consideration  the 

;,.,     Proceedings  of  the  Continental  Congress,       -  1188 

27,  Letter  from  Baltimore  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 

York.  From  the  late  conduct  of  the  Council 
and  Assembly  of  New- York,  the  happiest  con- 
sequences to  the  country  are  anticipated. — 
Some  persons  in  Baltimore  have  had  the  im- 
becility to  approve  of  the  frantick  proceedings 
of  certain  Men,  who  lately  styled  themselves 
Delegates  to  a  Provincial  Congress,      -         -  1 190 

27,     Letter  from  New- York  to  a  Gentleman  in  Bos-     \ 
ton.     Notwithstanding  the  late  vote  of  the  As- 
sembly, there  is  no  cause  to  fear  New- York 
will  depart  from  the  Association.     The  As- 
sembly has  existed  since  1 769 ;  and  many  of 
the  Members,  having  long  since  forfeited  the 
esteem  of  their  constituents,  are  looking  for 
favours  from  the  Crown  for  themselves  and 
families,  ...... 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  the  Precinct  of 
Hanover,  in  Ulster  County,  New- York.  The 
Association  unanimously  approved.  The 
Pamphlet,  "  Free  Thoughts  on  the  Resolves 
of  the  Congress,"  publickly  burnt, 
Declaration  of  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the 
Township  of  Jamaica,  in  Queen's  County, 
New- York.  Never  gave  any  consent  to 
choose  a  Committee,  or  pass  any  Resolves. 
Utterly  disapprove  of  all  unlawful  meetings 
and  tyrannical  proceedings.  Will  continue 
faithful  Subjects  to  the  King;  and  acknow- 
ledge no  Representatives  but  the  Assembly  of 
the  Province,     -         -         -         -         -         -  1 19 1 

27,  Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth. The  Towns  in  Massachusetts  have 
become  more  divided,  notwithstanding  the  en- 
deavours to  keep  up  their  enthusiasm.  A  de- 
tachment sent  for  the  protection  of  Marshfield 
and  Scituate,  upon  their  application.  This  is 
the  first  instance  the  assistance  of  Government 
has  been  requested, 1698 


27, 


27, 


1191 


1191 


XCI 

1775. 
Ja».27, 


28. 


CONTENTS.  xcii 


30, 

30, 

30, 

30, 
30, 


30, 
30, 


31, 


Feb. 


Feb. 


Feb.  1 
1. 


Votes  and  Resolves  passed  at  a  Convention  of 
Committees  for  the  County  of  Worcester,  in 
Massachusetts,  .         .         -         -         - 

Letter  from  a  Merchant  in  Annapolis,  to  a  Gen- 
tleman in  Philadelphia.  They  have  defeated 
an  insolent  plan  of  levying  Money  upon  his 
Majesty's  faithful  Subjects  in  Anne  Arundel 
County,  to  raise  a  fund  for  the  express  purpose 
of  purchasing  Arms  and  Ammimition,  to  join 
the  treasonable  purpose  projected  by  Adams 
and  the  Eastern  Republicans,  to  carry  on  a 
formal  Rebellion  in  the  Colonies, 

Answer  of  the  Governour  of  his  Majesty's  Prov- 
ince of  Pennsylvania,  in  America,  to  the  seve- 
ral heads  of  Inquiry,  relative  to  the  present 
state  and  condition  of  the  said  Province,  trans- 
mitted by  the  Right  Honourable  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,  in  his  Letter  of  July  5,  1773, 

Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,       .         .         -         -         - 

Meeting  of  Freeholders  in  the  Precinct  of  Wall- 
kill,  Ulster  County,  New- York.  Approve  of 
the  Association  of  the  General  Congress. — 
"  Free  Thoughts  on  the  Resolves  of  the  Con- 
gress," burnt,     ------ 

Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  of  New- 
York.  Commission  sent  to  General  Gage,  to 
try  and  execute  certain  persons  in  the  Colo- 
nies,        ...---- 

To\vn  Meeting  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Ridgefield, 
in  Cormecticut.  Refuse  to  adopt  or  conform 
to  the  Association  of  the  Continental  Congress; 
and  protest  against  the  Congress  and  their 
measures,  as  unconstitutional,  and  as  counte- 
nancing licentiousness.  Acknowledge  the 
King  as  the  rightful  Sovereign,  and  the  King 
and  Parliament  as  the  rightful  Government  of 
the  whole  British  Empire,  ... 

New- York  Committee  appoint  Sub-Committee, 
to  observe  the  conduct  of  all  Vessels  that  arrive 
after  the  first  day  of  February,      -         .         - 

Letter  from  New- York,  to  a  Gentleman  in  Bos- 
ton. There  is  now  no  chance  of  the  Assem- 
bly's aiding  or  abetting  the  Congress.  The 
friends  of  Government  are  open-mouthed 
against  the  Proceedings  of  the  Congress ;  and 
no  one  dares,  among  gentlemen,  to  support 
them,        ....... 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Westmoreland 
County,  Virginia.  Delegates  to  the  Conven- 
tion elected.  Instructions  to  the  Delegates. — 
Committee  of  Observation  appointed. 

Letter  to  Lord  North.  Proposes  settling  the  dif- 
ferences with  the  Colonies,  without  subjuga- 
ting the  Americans  on  the  one  hand,  or  impair- 
ing the  supreme  authority  of  the  Parliament  on 
the  other,  ..... 

Letter  from  Thomas  Cushing  to  Arthur  Lee. — 
The  People  are  not  dismayed  at  the  King's 
Speech  ;  and  if  an  attempt  is  made  to  carry  the 
Acts  of  Parliament  into  execution,  by  a  Mili- 
tary Force,  the  People  of  America  wU  make 
the  last  appeal.  They  are  determined  Life 
and  Liberty  shall  go  together,       ... 

Letter  from  Annapolis,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Thousands  in  Maryland  would  return 
to  their  duty  and  allegiance,  but  for  the  cun- 
ning of  their  leaders,  which  has  rendered  re- 
treat so  difficult.  Every  man  in  private  must 
think  the  Congressmen,  and  their  sattelites  the 
Committce-Men,  the  truest,  though  absurdcst, 
tyrants,  that  any  country  ever  had  cause  to 
complain  of,       -        -         ...         . 

,  Letter  from  Colonel  Adam  Stephen  to  Richard 
Henry  Lee,  ---... 
Letter  from  Boston,  to  a  Gentleman  in  Philadel- 
phia. The  report  that  the  Gluakcrs  in  Boston 
opened  their  Shops,  on  the  day  of  Publick 
Thanksgiving,  is  without  foundation,  and  pro- 
pagated for  the  most  vile  and  malevolent  pur- 
poses,     ---.... 

Letter  from  Governour  Franklin  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth.  Had  hopes  that  the  Assembly 
would  not  approve  the  Proceedings  of  the 
General  Congress;  but,  by  the  artful  manage- 
ment of  those  who  espoused  the  measure,  it 
was  carried  through  the  morning  it  was  pro- 
posed,         


1192 


-  1194 


1194 

-  1698 


1201 


1202 


1775. 
Feb.  2, 


1202 


1203 


1203 


-  1203 


-  1204 


-  1208 


1208 


1209 


1210 


-  1697 


Declaration  of  sundry  Inhabitants  of  Ridgebury, 
in  the  Town  of  Ridgefield,  that,  at  the  Meeting 
on  the  30th  of  January,  they  did  not  vote  with 
the  majority  against  adopting  the  Association 
of  the  Continental  Congress,         -         -         -   12lt) 

4,  Letter  from  London,  to  a  Gentleman  in  Philadel- 
phia. Does  not  know  how  soon  communica- 
tion with  the  Colonies  may  be  cut  off  by  hos- 
tilities. The  Americans  have  many  enemies 
in  England,        ......   121 1 

4,  Letter  from  Philadelphia,  to  James  Rivington, 
New- York.  May  assure  his  readers  that  Mr. 
Dickinson  has  declared  that  "  he  was  really 
alarmed  at  the  proceedings  of  the  Committee. ' 
He  formerly  took  the  lead ;  at  the  late  Provin- 
cial Congress  he  did  not  speak  at  all.  In  spite 
of  the  arts  of  the  fiery  Republicans,  Associa- 
tions are  concerting  to  counteract  the  authority 
of  unconstitutional  Congresses  and  Committees 
of  all  sorts, 1211 

4,  Address  to  the  Americans.  It  is  the  duty  and  the 
interest  of  the  People  to  of5<;r  terms  of  reconci- 
liation to  the  Parent  State.  The  Congress  have 
adopted  such  irritating  measures,  as  disqualify 
them  for  offering  terms  of  accommodation,      -   1211 

Q,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Lancaster  County, 
Virginia.  Committee  to  carry  into  effect  the 
American  Association,  elected.  Delegates  to 
the  Convention  appointed  and  instructed,         -  1213 

6,  Letter  received  in  New- York,  from  London. — 
Nothing  can  be  more  false  than  the  represent- 
ations of  hostile  intentions  against  America, 
formed  by  the  present  Administration.  The 
Americans  should  make  the  first  advances  to- 
wards a  reconciliation.  A  Petition  from  the 
Assemblies  will  be  attended  with  success,  if 
their  claims  are  accurately  limited  and  defined,   1214 

6,  Letter  from  Philadelphia,  to  a  Gentleman  in 
New- York.  A  faithful  adherence  to  the  As- 
sociation in  New- York,  will  go  far  to  remove 
the  infamy  which  will  fall  upon  that  Province, 
whose  defection  may  tend  to  defeat  the  virtu- 
ous struggles  in  which  we  are  engaged,  -  1215 

6,  Meeting  of  the  Freemen  and  Inhabitants  of  New- 
towTi,  in  Connecticut.  Refuse  to  adopt  or  con- 
form to  the  Association,  and  protest  against  the 
Continental  Congress,  and  their  measures,  as 
unconstitutional,  and  tending  to  licentiousness,  1215 

6,  Town  Meeting  at  Danbury,  in  Connecticut. — 
Refuse  to  appoint  Delegates  to  meet  the  Coun- 
ty Congress,  to  be  held  at  Fairfield,  on  the  1 4th 
instant,  and  rescind  the  vote  appointing  a  Com- 
mittee of  Inspection,  -  -  -  -  1216 
6,  Handbill  distributed  through  Boston.  Let  us 
seize  our  seducers,  make  peace  with  the  Mo- 
ther Country,  and  save  ourselves,  -         -   1216 

6,  Letter  from  Boston,  to  a  Gentleman  in  Philadel- 

phia. The  Tories  are  perpetually  holding  up 
to  view  the  terrifick  consequences  of  Treason 
and  Rebellion  ;  but  they  bellow  to  the  winds. 
So  generally  are  the  principles  of  Liberty  dis- 
seminated among  the  People,  that  nothing  but 
Arms  can  suppress  it,  -         -         -         -   1216 

7,  Proceedings  of  the  Committee  of  Obser^iition  for 

the  Borough  of  Norfolk,  in  Virginia,  on  a 
complaint  against  Dr.  Gordon,     ...   1217 

7,     Address  presented  to  General   Gage,  from  Six 

Towns  in  Plymouth  County,  Massachusetts,      1218 

6,  Meeting  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others, 
in  London,  concerned  in  the  American  Com- 
merce. Report  of  the  Committee  appointed  to 
present  the  second  Petition  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  ......  i219 

7,  Meeting  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others, 

in  London,  concerned  in  American  Commerce. 
Report  of  the  Committee  appointed  to  present 
the  Petition  to  the  House  of  Lords,        -         -   1220 

8,  Address  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  Manufac- 

turers, of  Birmingham,  concerned  in  the  Trade 

to  America,  to  Mr.  Edmund  Burke,       -         -   1221 

8,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  for  Westmoreland 
County,  Virginia.  Pedlars  required  to  pro- 
duce proof  to  the  Committee  that  their  Goods 
were  imported  before  the  1st  of  February,      -   1222 

8,  Letter  from  Doctor  John  Connolly  to  Colonel 
George  Washington.  Wishes  to  nave  informa- 
tion how  he  is  to  proceed  with  the  Mingoe 
Prisoners,  ......   1222 


XCIII 

1775. 
Feb.  9, 


CONTENTS. 


3ECIV 


Meeting  of  the  Conunittee  of  Correspondence  of 
Brentwood,  in  New-Hampshire.  Will  abide 
by  the  advice  of  the  Continental  Congress. 
Pedlars  not  permitted  to  sell,  and  persons  who 
trade  with  them,  or  entertain  them,  to  be  treated 
as  enemies  to  the  Country,  -         -         -   1222 

10,  Committee  of  Portsmouth,  New- Hampshire,  for 
carrying  the  Association  of  the  Continental 
Congress  into  execution,  discountenance  Ga- 
ming,          1223 

10,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  Virginia. 
Parliament  have  declared  Massachusetts  in  re- 
bellion. Americans  must  now  look  firmly 
forward.  Submission  and  Chains,  or.  Resist- 
ance and  Liberty,  is  the  alternative,       -         -   1223 

10,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  Determination  of  the  King,  and  pre- 
parations in  England,  to  make  the  Colonies 
submit, 1224 

10,  Letter  from  London  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York.  All  hopes  of  conciliation  between 
England  and  her  Colonies,  are  entirely  at  an 
aid.  The  King  and  Parliament  have  pro- 
nounced their  destruction.  Fleets  and  Armies 
are  preparing  with  the  utmost  diligence  for 
that  purpose,       ......  1225 

10,      Information  received  at  Williamsburg,  from  the 

Indian  Frontiers,  and  from  Pittsburgh,  -  1226 

10,  Premiums  offered  by  the  Committee  of  Bedford, 
in  Pennsylvania,  for  the  encouragement  of  In- 
du.stry  and  Manufactures,     ....  1226 

10,  Address  of  the  Grand  Jury  to  his  Majesty's  Jus- 
tices, assembled  at  the  General  Quarter  Ses- 
sions of  the  Peace,  for  the  City  and  County  of 
New- York, 1227 

10,  Letter  from  Connecticut  to  Mr.  Rivington.  A 
Presbyterian  Minister,  near  North- Haven,  has 
declared  he  had  practised  the  Military  Exercise, 
with  the  intention  of  going  to  Boston  against 
the  King's  Troops, 1227 

10,  Letter  from   Massachusetts  to  a  Gentleman  in 

London, -         -  1227 

11,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  for 

Bedford  County,  Pennsylvania,  to  Joseph  Read. 
Approve  of  the  Resolves  of  the  Convention, 
and  bound  by  them,  .-..■«  1229 
1 1,  The  Royal  Standard  erected  on  a  mast  seventy- 
five  feet  high,  at  Shawangunk,  in  Ulster  Coun- 
ty, New- York,  by  a  respectable  number  of  his 
Majesty's  loyal  Subjects  -  .  .  .  1230 
11,     Letter  from  Kent  County,  in  Delaware,  published 

in  the  Pennsylvania  Ledger,         -         -         -  1230 

Letter  from  the  Committee  for  Kent  County,  Del- 
aware, February  15,  to  the  Committee  of  Cor- 
respondence for  Philadelphia,  in  relation  to  the 
Letter  published  in  the  Ledger,  of  the  1 1th  in- 
stant,   1231 

Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  Mr.  Rivington,  Feb- 
ruary 16.  Tyranny  of  the  Committee — they 
are  aiming  at  a  general  Revolution,  and  pro- 
mote every  measure  to  overthrow  the  Consti- 
tution,        1231 

Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 
York,  February  20,  Proceedings  in  regard 
to  the  Letter  said  to  be  from  Kent  County,  in 

Delaware, 1233 

13,  Thanks  of  the  Common  Council  of  London  to 
Lord  Chatham,  for  offering  his  Plan  for  con- 
ciliating the  differences  between  Great  Britain 
and  the  Colonies,         ..... 

Answer  of  Lord  Chatham  to  the  Common  Coun- 
cil of  London,  ..... 
13,  Letter  from  London.  Nothing  will  move  the 
King  and  his  Ministers,  but  absolute  submis- 
sion or  a  successful  resistance.  The  Ministry 
affect  to  believe  there  will  be  no  resistance, 
and  assure  themselves  of  the  defection  of  New. 
York, 

13,  Committee  of  Elizabethtown,  in  New- Jersey,  di- 

rect the  suspension  of  all  Trade  and  Inter- 
course whatsoever,  with  Staton  Island,  in  New- 
York,        

1 4,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  York  County,  Penn- 

sylvania. Recommend  the  collection  and  pre- 
servation of  Gunpowder;  encourage  Military 
Associations;  direct  the  transmission  of  Con- 
tributions to  Boston ;  and  appoint  Delegates  to 
the  next  Convention,  .        .        ,        ,  1235 


1235 
1236 

1236 

1239 
1239 


1233 
1233 


-  1234 


-  1234 


1775. 
Jt!&  14,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  and  other  Inhabitants 
of  the  City  and  County  of  Burlington,  in  New- 
Jersey.  Association  of  the  General  American 
Congress,  read  and  approved,  and  Committee 
of  Observation  appointed,     .... 

14,  Two  Inhabitants  of  Ridgofield  not  permitted  to 
remain  for  the  night  in  Wethersfield,  but  sent 
back  to  Ridgefield,  under  an  escort, 

14,      Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Meeting  of  the  Delegates 
from  the  several  Toutis  in  the  County  of  Fair- 
field, in  Connecticut,  .... 
Association  of  the  Liberty  Men  of  Ridgebury,  in 
Fairfield  County,  Connecticut,      ... 

14,  Letter  from  Samuel  Adams  to  Arthur  Lee, 

15,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Observation  for  the 

Township  of  Hanover,  Morris  County,  New- 
Jersey.  Will  enforce  and  comply  with  every 
Article  of  the  Association  of  the  General  Con- 
tinental Congress;  will  have  no  dealings  with 
James  Rivington,  and  will  discountenance  any 
Post-Rider,  or  Carrier,  who  shall  bring  his 
Pamphlets  or  Paper  into  the  County,  -  1240 

16,  The  Governour  of  Pennsylvania  presents  to  the 

Council  the  complaint  of  Mr.  Waterhouse,  In- 
spector of  his  Majesty's  Customs,  that  the  Ma- 
gistrates and  Sheriff  of   Chester  County  had 
refused  their  aid  in  preventing  the  rescue  of  a 
Vessel  seized  on  the  Delaware,  with  contra- 
band Goods,       -         -         -         -         -         -  1241 

Letter  from  Francis  Welch,  a  Tide- Waiter,  dated 
February  8th,  communicating  a  statement  of 
the  facts  in  the  case  complained  of  by  Mr. 
Waterhouse,       ......  1241 

•i^'he  Council  are  of  opinion  the  Magistrates  and 

'SiA  -      Sheriff  could  not  legally  afibrd  the  assistance 

that  was  required  of  them,  -         -  1242 

16,  Letter  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  of 
Philadelphia,  to  the  Committee  of  Correspond- 
ence of  New- York.  The  frequent  publica- 
tions in  New- York,  of  dissensions  in  Philadel- 
phia, are  false  representations.  The  Commit- 
tee have  not  met  with  the  least  impedunent  in 
carrying  into  execution  the  Association.  The 
Inhabitants  of  Pennsylvania  continue  immove- 
ably  firm  to  the  cause  of  Liberty,  and  will,  \vith 
inviolable  faith,  observe  the  conduct  prescribed 
by  the  Continental  Congress,         ... 

16,  A  Ship  at  New- York,  from  Glasgow,   with  a 

cargo  of  Dry  Goods,  which  did  not  arrive 
within  the  time  prescribed  in  the  Association, 
not  permitted  to  land  her  cargo, 

17,  Letter  from  Adam  Stephen  to  Richard  Henry 

Lee,  -        -        -        -        -        - 

17,      Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth.     The  King's  Speech  has  cast  a  damp 
upon  the  Faction ;  but  they  still  entertain  hopes 
that  the  Resolves  of  Congress  will  work  in 
their  favour.      The  loyalty  in  the  New- York 
Assembly  has  had  a  very  good  effect,  and  it  is 
said  they  are  changing  their  sentiments  at  Phil- 
adelphia, ...... 

17,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  the  Tovm  of  Ply- 
mouth, in  New-Hampshire.  Instructions  to 
John  Fenton,  Representative  of  the  Town  in 
the  Assembly,  .         ,         .         -         . 

17,  Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 

mouth,     ...---- 

18,  Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Cumberland  Cotm- 

ty,  Virginia.  Premium  for  the  manufacture  of 
Gunpowder,  ...--- 
Address  of  the  Committee  of  Cumberland  County, 
to  the  Delegates  who  represented  Virginia  in 
tlie  late  Continental  Congress,       ... 

19,  Letter  from  Boston,  to  a  Gentleman  in  New- 

York.  The  Provincial  Congress,  distracted 
and  divided  in  opinion,  separated  without  do- 
ing any  thing  more  than  is  in  their  published 
Resolves  ;  the  principal  object  of  their  meeting 
was  to  cajole  the  men  of  property,  but  no  im- 
pression could  be  made  on  them.  Their  dupes 
drop  from  them  very  fast,  and  it  is  expected  the 
few  Demagogues  will  soon  be  left  alone, 

20,  Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Hanover  County, 

Virginia.  Delegates  to  the  Convention  chosen, 
andlnstructed  to  consent  to  the  imposition  of 
any  Tax  the  Convention  may  judge  proper  for 
defraying  the  expense  of  any  measure  neces- 
sarily adopted  for  securing  American  Liberty, 


1243 

1243 
1244 


-  1244 

1245 

1708 

1247 
1247 


-  1248 


1248 


xcv 

1775. 
JrtJi.20, 


CONTENTS. 


XCVI 


20, 
20, 

20, 

20. 
21, 

21. 

22. 
22. 


1249 


-  1249 


1249 

1250 
1251 

1251 
1251 

1709 
1252 


1252 


Meeting  of  the  Committee  of  Observation  for  the 
Township  of  Woodbridge,  in  New-Jers'y. 
Suspend  ail  Trade  and  intercourse  with  the 
Inhabitants  of  Staten  Island,  except  such  of 
ihem  as  have  openly  approved  the  Association, 
20,  TowTi  Meeting  at  Marshlield,  in  Massachusetts. 
Refuse  to  adopt  the  Resolves  and  Recommend- 
ations of  the  Continental  or  Provincial  Con- 
gresses, or  any  illegal  assemblies  whatsoever. 
Vote  the  Thanks  of  the  Town  to  General 
Gage  and  Admiral  Graves  for  theix  assistance 
and  protection,  -        -        "      , T,     ■" 

Protest  of  sixty-four  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Marsh- 
field,  against  the  Proceedmgs  of  the  Town 
Meeting  held  tliere  on  the  20th  of  February, 

Address  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Marshfield,  assem- 
bled in  Towni  Meeting,  to  General  Gage, 

Answer  to  the  Address,  -         -         - 

Address  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Marshfield,  assem- 
bled in  Town  Meeting,  to  Admiral  Graves, 

Answer  of  Admiral  Graves,  -         "         " 

Letter  from  Governour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,       ------ 

Letter  from  Joseph  Warren  to  Arthur  Lee, 

Resolutions  adopted  at  a  Court  of  Common 
Council,  held  at  Guildhall,  in  London.  The 
Americans  are  justified  in  their  opposition  to 
the  late  Acts  of  Parliament  affecting  the  Colo- 
nies, .         -         -         -         -         '.       e 

Proclamation  of  the  Governour  of  Georgia,  of- 
fermg  a  reward  to  any  person  who  will  give 
information  against  one  or  more  of  the  persons 
%vho  rescued  certain  Goods  seized  by  the  Cus- 
tom House  Officers  at  Savannah,  and  tarred 
and  feathered  a  Tide-Waiter,        -         -         -  1253 

Meeting  of  the  Freeholders  of  Augusta  County, 
Virginia.  Delegates  to  the  Convention  chos- 
en.     Instructions  to  the  Delegates,        -         -1253 

Address  of  the  Freeholders  of  Augusta  County, 
to  the  Delegates  from  Virginia,  in  the  late 
Continental  Congress,  ....  1255 

Answer  to  the  Address,  ....  1255 

Address  of  the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of 
the  County  of  Botetourt,  to  the  Delegates  from 
Virginia  in  the  late  Continental  Congress,      -  1255 

22,  Plan  of  an  American  Manufactory,  -         -  1256 

23,  Pilots  at  New- York  ordered  not  to  bring  up 

the  Ship  Beulah,  and  Sub-Committee  of  Ob- 
servation appointed  to  observe  her  conduct 
Soon  as  she  receives  Supplies,  is  to  be  de- 
spatched without  being  permitted  to  enter  the 
Harbour, 1257 

23,  Proceedings  at  a  meeting  of  the  Coinmittees  of 
Observation  of  several  Towns  in  Suffolk 
County,  New- York,  ....  1257 

23.  Association  signed  by  one  hundred  and  forty-one 
Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the  To^vn  of 
Reading,  in  Fairfield  County,  Connecticut 
Will  defend,  maintain,  and  preserve,  at  the 
risk  of  their  lives  and  properties,  the  preroga- 
tive of  the  Crown,  and  the  privileges  of  the 
Subject,  from  all  attacks  of  any  rebellious  body 
of  Men,  and  any  Conmiittees  of  Inspection,  or 
Correspondence,  .         .         -         .         .  1258 

Names  of  seventy-four  of  the  signers  of  the  As- 
sociation, published  by  order  of  the  Committee 
of  Observation,  for  the  Town  of  Reading,  -  1259 
List  of  all  the  Signers  to  the  Reading  Associa- 
tion, communicated  to  Mr.  Ri\'ington,  by  John 
Lyon,  one  of  the  subscribers,        ...  1260 

23,  Address  to  the  Provincial  Congress  of  Mas- 
sachusetts. Enumeration  of  some  of  the  in- 
stances of  cruelties,  insults,  and  indignities 
inflicted  on  the  quiet  and  peaceable  Subjects  of 
the  King,  in  Massachusetts,  ...  1260 

22,  Instructions  of  General  Gage  to  Captain  Brown 
and  Ensign  DBemicre,  to  go  through  the 
Counties  of  Suffolk  and  Worcester,  and  make 
sketches  of  the  Roads,  Rivers,  Towns,  and 
places  for  Encampment,  and  to  ascertain,  what 
Forage  and  Pro\isions  the  Counties  could  sup- 
ply,   1263 

Narrative  of  Ensign  DBemicre  of  the  Examina- 
tion of  the  Coimtry,  under  General  Gage's  In- 
structions, ......  1263 

26,  Regiment  of  British  Troops  under  the  command 
of  Colonel  Leslie,  land  at  Marblehead,  and 
march  to  Salem, 1268 


-  12G9 


1269 


27. 


Jan.il,  Goods,  under  the  Tenth  Article  of  the  Association, 
thrown  overboard  at  Cliarlestown,  by  order 
of  the  Committee  of  Observation, 
27  Philadelphia  Committee.  Recommend  the  total 
disuse  of  East  India  Tea,  in  compliance  A\ith 
the  Third  Article  of  the  Association, 
Meeting  of  a  number  of  the  Freeholders  and  In- 
habitonlsof  the  Townof  New-Milford,  in  Litch- 
field County,  Connecticut  Protest  against 
the  Towi  of  New-Milford's  adopting  the  Re- 
solves of  the  Continental  Congress.  Acknow- 
ledge the  King  and  Parliament  as  the  Consti- 
tutional Government  over  every  part  of  the 
British  Empire,  .         .         .         - 

Letter  from  Philadelphia,  to  a  Gentleman  in 
New- York.  A  motion  in  the  Assembly,  to 
petition  the  I^ng,  strenuously  opposed.  Mr. 
Dickinson  acquired  fresh  laurels  in  the  De- 
bate. The  motion  will  be  rejected  by  a  great 
majority,  .... 

Letter  from  Philadelphia  to  Mr.  Rivington.  The 
opposition  to  the  Congress  has  done  some  good 
in  the  Assembly.  Should  the  Assembly  agree 
to  petition,  it  will  be  done  in  a  very  dutiful  style,  1270 


27, 


28, 


1270 


-  1270 


1271 


COUNCIL   OF    PENNSYLVANIA. 

Jan.25,  The  Governour  submits  information  of  further 
violences  committed  by  the  People  of  Virginia, 

in  Westmoreland, 1271 

Letter  from  Robert  Haima  to  the  Governour. 
Attack  on  the  Jail  of  Westmoreland  County 
by  the  Militia  and  People  of  Virginia, 
8,  Letter  from  John  Carnaghan  to  Governour  Penn, 
with  four  Depositions  respecting  the  attack  on 
the  Jail  of  Westmoreland  County,         -         -  1271 

13,  Letter  from  Robert  Hanna,  and  others,  to  Gov- 

ernour Penn,  on  the  same  subject,         -         -   1273 

14,  Letter  from  Devereux  Smith  to  Governour  Penn. 

Complains  of  the  proceedings  of  the  Virgi- 
nians, and  encloses  Depositions,  ... 
March  Letter  from  Governour  Penn  to  Lord  Dunmore. 
1 ,  Remonstrates  against  his  proceedings  in  relation 
to  Westmoreland  County.  Will  forbear  to 
take  any  steps  in  the  affair  fill  he  has  an  an- 
swer to  this  Letter,  which  he  expects  by  the 
return  of  the  Express,         .... 


1274 


1276 


PENNSYLVANIA  ASSEMBLY. 

FcJ.20,  The  House  met  pursuant  to  their  adjournment. 

Speaker  communicated  a  Letter  from  the  Speaker 
of  House  of  Assembly  of  New-Jersey,  with 
Resolves,  approving  the  Proceedings  of  the 
Continental  Congress,  .... 

Instructions  to  the  Delegates  to  the  Continental 
Congress  considered,  .... 

Message  from  the  Governour,  recommending  a 
Petition  to  the  King  for  the  redress  of  any 
Grievances  which  the  People  apprehend  they 
have  reason  to  complain  of,  ... 

The  Governour's  Message  considered. 

Further  considered  and  postponed, 

Consideration  will  be  resumed  on  the  8th  of 
March  next,       ...... 

March  Motion  that  the  Doors  be  opened  on  the  8th,  for 


21, 


23, 

24, 
25, 


4, 
7, 


9. 


13. 


15, 


the  Inhabitants  to  hear  the  Debates, 
Message  from  the  Governour,  requesting  pro'vi- 
sion  to  be  made  for  a  number  of  Indians,  re- 
cently arrived  at  Pliiladelphia, 
Representation  and  Petition  from  the  American 
Philosophical  Society,  .         .         .         . 

Consideration  of  the  Governour's  Message  re- 
sumed, and  Committee  appointed  to  prepare  an 
Answer,  ...... 

Answer  to  Governour's  Message  considered, 
Motion  to  Recommit  rejected,  .         .         . 

Ordered  to  be  Transcribed  and  sent  to  the  Gov- 


1275 


1273 
1277 


1277 
1277 
1277 

1277 

1278 


-  1278 
1278 


1280 
1280 
1280 


ernour,      .         .         - 
Answer  of  the  House  to 
sage. 


the  Governour's  Mes- 


-  1280 


1280 


The  Speaker  laid  before  the  House  a  Letter, 
datetl  the  24th  of  December  last,  from  William 
Bollan,  Benjamin  Franklin,  and  Arthur  Lee, 

William  Morton  chosen  Speaker  in  place  of  Ed- 
ward Biddle,  who  is  prevented,  by  sickness, 
from  attending  the  House,  ... 

Adjourned  to  the  first  of  May  next, 


1281 


1282 

1282 


XCVll 


1775. 


CONTENTS. 


XCVIII 


1775. 


NEW-YORK  ASSEMBLY. 


/ftw.lO,  Meeting  of  the  Assembly,       .         -         -         - 
13,     Speech  of  Lieutenant  Governour  Golden  to  the 
Council  and  Assembly-   Advises  them  to  peti- 
tion the  King  for  redress  of  Grievances, 

Committee  appointed  to  prepare  an  Address,  in 
answer  to  the  Speech,  ... 

Consideration  of  the  Speech  referred  to  a  Com- 
mittee  of  the  Whole  House, 

Committee  appointed  to  correspond  with  Ed- 
mund Burke,  Agent  of  this  Colony  at  the 
Court  of  Great  Britain,  laid  before  the  House 
several  Letters  received  from  him, 
17,  The  Speaker,  from  the  Committee  of  Corres- 
pondence, laid  before  the  House  several  Letters 
and  other  Papers,  .... 
18,  Address  of  the  Council,  in  answer  to  the  Lieu, 
tenant  Governour's  Speech, 

Answer  to  the  Council,  .... 

20,     Address  of   the  Assembly,   in  answer  to  the 
Lieutenant  Governour's  Speech, 

Answer  of  the  Lieutenant  Grovernour, 
26,     Message  from  the  Lieutenant  Governour.  Boim- 
dary  of  New- York  and  Pennsylvania, 

Motion  by  Colonel  Ten  Broeck,  that  the  House 
take  into  consideration  the  Proceedings  of  the 
Continental  Congress,  ... 

Colonel  Philips's  motion  for  the  Previous  Ques- 
tion, ....... 

Message  from  the  Lieutenant  Governour, 

The  Speaker  laid  before  the  House  a  Letter  from 
ihe  Speaker  of  the  Assembly  of  New- Jersey, 
enclosing  simdry  Resolutions  passed  by  that 
House, 

On  the  motion  of  Colonel  Livingston,  the  House 
agreed  to  take  into  consideration  the  state  of 
the  Colony ;  to  enter  such  Resolutions  as  they 
may  agree  to  on  their  Journals,  and  to  prepare 
a  Petition  to  the  King,  ... 

On  motion  of  Mr.  De  Lancey,  the  House  agreed 
to  send  with  the  Petition  to  his  Majesty,  a  Me- 
morial to  the  House  of  Lords,  and  a  Repre- 
sentation and  Remonstrance  to  the  Commons, 

Committee  appointed  to  prepare  a  state  of  the 
Grievances  of  the  Colony, 
Ftb.  2,  House  in  Committee  on  the  Lieutenant  Govern- 
our's Speech,      ...... 

7,     Message  from  the  Lieutenemt  Governour, 

Speech  further  considered  in  Committee, 

16,  Colonel  Schuyler's  motion  that  certain  Letters 

be  published ;  Rejected,       .... 

1 7,  Colonel  Woodhull's  motion  for  a  Vote  of  Thanks 

to  the  Delegates  from  New- York  in  the  late 
Continental  Congress ;  Rejected, 
21,  Colonel  P.  Livingston's  motion  for  a  Vote  of 
Thanks  to  the  Merchants  and  Inhabitants  for 
their  firm  adherence  to  the  Association  of  the 
Grand  Continental  Congress;  Rejected, 
23,  Report  from  the  Committee  to  prepare  a  state  of 
the  Grievances,  referred  to  a  Committee  of  the 
Whole  House,  .... 

Mr.  Thomas's  motion  for  taking  into  considera- 
tion the  necessity  of  appointing  Delegates  to 
meet  the  General  Congress  on  the  10th  of 
May  next ;  Rejected,  .         .         .         . 

Speech  of  Mr.  Brush,  of  Cumberland  County,  on 
this  question,      ...... 

Speech  of  Mr.  Wilkins,  of  Westchester  County, 
March  The  House  in  Committee  on  the  state  of  Griev- 


27, 

28, 


31, 


1281 


1283 

-  1283 


-  1283 


-  1283 


-  1284 

1284 
1285 

1285 
1286 

-  1286 


-  1286 

1287 
1287 


1287 


-  1288 


1288 

-  1288 

1288 
1288 
1289 

1289 


-  1289 


-  1290 


-  1290 


1290 

1290 
1293 


March,  Resolutions  of  the  Committee  of  the  Whole,  pro- 


1 


16, 
23, 

24, 


25, 


28, 


31, 


31, 


1304 
1307 

-  1308 

1309 
1312 

1813 

1313 


1316 
1318 


1321 
1321 

-  1321 


1322 

1323 

1323 
1324 
1324 


9, 


11, 
13, 


ances  of  the  Colony,  ....  1297 

State  of  Grievances  further  considered  in  Com- 
mittee, 

Proceedings  and  Votes  on  the  Report  on  the 
Grievances  of  the  Colony, 

Committee  appointed  to  prepare  a  set  of  Resolu- 
tions agreeable  to  Colonel  P.  Livingston's  mo- 
tion of  January  31,     ..... 

Report  of  the  Committee ;  Resolutions  agreed  to,  1302 

Committees  appointed  to  prepare  a  Petition  to  the 
King,  a  Memorial  to  the  Lords,  and  a  Repre- 
sentation and  Remonstrance  to  the  Commons, 

Letter  from  Edmund  Burke,  laid  before  the  House 
by  the  Committee,        ..... 

Letter  from  William  BoUan,  Benjamin  Franklin, 
and  Arthur  Lee,  dated  December  24,  laid  be- 
fore the  House  by  the  Speaker,     ... 

Message  from  the  Lieutenant  Governour, 

Fourth  Series. 


-  1297 


-  1297 


1302 


1303 
1304 


1304 
1304 


viding  for  the  support  of  the  Government  in 
the  Colony  for  the  year,       .... 

Petition,  Memorial,  and  Remonstrance,  reported, 

Message  from  the  Lieutenant  Governour.  Dis- 
turbances in  Cumberland  County, 

Proceedings  and  Votes  on  the  Petition  to  the 
King, 

Votes  on  the  Memorial  to  the  House  of  Lords, 

Proceedings  on  the  Representation  and  Remon- 
strance to  the  House  of  Commons, 

The  humble  Petition  of  the  General  Assembly  of 
the  Colony  of  New- York,  to  the  King, 

The  Memorial  of  his  Majesty's  faithful  Subjects 
the  Representatives  of  the  Colony  of  New- 
York,  in  General  Assembly  convened,  to  the 
House  of  Lords,  ..... 

The  Representation  and  Remonstrance  of  the 
General  Assembly  of  the  Colony  of  New- 
York  to  the  House  of  Commons, 

The  Petition,  Memorial,  and  Remonstrance,  di- 
rected to  be  forwarded  with  all  convenient  speed 
to  Edmund  Burke,      ..... 

Message  from  the  Lieutenant  Governour, 

Proceedings  and  Votes  in  regard  to  the  Cum- 
berland Riots,    -        -        -        . 

The  Speaker  directed  to  transmit  to  the  Speakers 
of  the  several  Houses  of  Assembly,  on  the 
Continent,  copies  of  the  List  of  Grievances, 
and  the  Resolutions  thereof,  in  consequence ; 
and  the  Petition,  Memorial,  and  Remonstrance, 

Proceedings  and  Votes  in  relation  to  Riots  in  Al- 
bany and  Charlotte  Counties,         ... 

Reward  for  the  apprehension  of  Ethan  Allen, 
Seth  Warner,  and  others,     .... 
Apr.  1,  Committee  of  Correspondence  appointed, 

3,      Adjourned  to  May  3, 

PROVINCIAL  CONGRESS  OF  MASSACHUSETTS. 

Feb.  1,  List  of  the  Members, 1323 

John  Hancock  chosen  President,      ...  i328 

Committee  to  take  into  consideration  the  state  and 
circumstances  of  the  Province,     ...  1328 

The  Reverend  Dr.  Appleton  appointed  Chaplain,  1328 

Monitors  appointed,         .....  1328 

Committee  appointed  to  consider  the  Resolutions 
of  several  Committees  respecting  the  working 
of  the  Inhabitants  of  Boston  for  the  Troops, 

Debates  and  Resolutions  of  the  Congress  to  be 
kept  secret,        ...... 

Committee  to  publish  in  a  Pamphlet  some  of  the 
doings  of  the  late  Congress, 

Committee  to  prepare  an  Address  to  the  Inhabit- 
ants of  the  Province, 

Delegates  to  the  Congress  in  May  next,  to  con- 
tinue to  the  31st  day  of  December,  and  no 
longer, 

Troop  of  Horse  raised  by  John  Sawyer  and 
others,  of  Rowley,      -         .         . 

The  Secretary  empowered  to  adjourn  the  Con- 
gress in  the  absence  of  the  President,     - 

Inhabitants  recommended  not  to  supply  the 
Troops  with  any  thing  that  may  enable  them 
to  annoy  the  People;  all  who  do  so  to  be 
deemed  inveterate  enemies  to  America, 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  reported,  considered, 
and  recommitted, 

Again  reported,  considered,  and  recommitted. 

Committee  to  prepare  a  Resolution  recommend- 
ing the  saving  of  Linen  Rags,      .         -         - 

Committee  of  Safety  appointed,  with  power  to 
muster  as  many  of  the  Militia  of  the  Province 
as  they  shall  deem  proper,  completely  armed 
and  accoutred,  to  oppose  any  attempt  that  may 
be  made  to  carry  into  execution  the  late  Acts 
of  Parliament,  ... 

General  Officers  appointed  to  act  imder  the  au- 
thority of  the  Committee  of  Safety, 

A  number  of  Letters,  said  to  be  from  England, 
read  and  referred  to  the  Committee  on  the  state 
of  the  Province,  -         -         -        -        - 

Address  to  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Province,  again 
reported,  amended,  and  agreed  to. 

Address  from  the  Committee  of  Correspondence 
of  Scituate,  in  relation  to  a  number  of  British 
Troops  now  stationed  in  Marshfield,  read  and 
referred,  .... 


2, 
3, 


4. 


6, 


7, 


9, 


1328 


1329 


-  1329 
it- 

-  1329 


1329 


-  1329 
1329 


1330 

1330 
1330 

1330 


-  1332 
1332 


1332 
-  1332 


-  1334 


% 


CONTENTS. 


xcix 

1775. 
Feb.  9,  Committee  to  bring  in  a  Resolve  empowering 
the  Committee  of  Safety  to  take  possession  of 
the  Warlike  Stores  of  the  Province, 

Committee  to  bring  in  a  Resolve  directing  how 
the  Ordnance  in  the  Province  shall  be  used, 

Committee  to  make  a  return  of  the  Officers  and 
number  of  the  Militia,  and  Minute  Men,  to 
report,  as  soon  as  possible. 

Committee  to  prepare  for  publication  the  Names 
of  the  Mandamus  Counsellors  who  have  refused 
to  resign,  ...--- 

Inhabitants  of  the  Province  requested  to  preserve 
all  their  Linen  and  Cotton  Rags,  to  aid  an  Es- 
tablishment for  making  Paper,      -         -         - 

10,  Committee  to  observe  the  motion  of  the  Troops 

said  to  be  on  their  road  to  Cambridge, 

Committee  to  sit  in  the  recess  of  the  Congress, 
with  power  to  regulate  the  Constitutional  Army 
wiiich  may  be  raised  in  the  Province, 

Committee  to  revise  the  Commission  of  the  Com- 
mittee of  Safety,  '        '        '         '        'r 

The  Secretary  directed  to  publish  the  Names  of 
the  Mandamus  Counsellors  now  in  Boston, 

Petition  from  the  Delegatesof  the  several  Tow-ns 
in  the  Counties  of  Hampshire  and  Berkshire, 

11,  Committee  of  Siifety  authorized  to  appoint  a 

Commissary  to  deliver  Warlike  Stores  to 
the  Constitutional  Army  when  they  take  the 
field,  ..-'.--- 

Committee  of  Safety  requested  to  possess  them- 
selves of  all  Bayonets  and  other  implements  of 
war,  purchased  at  the  expense  of  the  Province, 
and  not  now  in  their  possession,    - 

Committee  appointed  to  report  a  Resolve,  ex- 
pressing the  determination  of  the  People,  coolly 
and  resolutely,  to  support  their  Rights  and  Pri- 
vileges, at  all  hazards, 

1 3,  Committee  appointed  to  inquire  into  the  state  of 

the  Militia,         ..... 
Committee  to  inquire  what  is  necessary  to  en 
courage  the  making  of  Saltpetre, 

14,  Report  of  the  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Mi- 

litia,   -        - 

15,  Committee  of  Correspondence  of  Boston  directed 

to  open  and  establish  an  intimate  correspond- 
ence and  connection  with  the  Inhabitants  of 
Q,uebeck,  ....-- 

Resolutions  for  the  encouragement  of  the  manu- 
facture of  Saltpetre  in  the  Province, 

Conunittee  to  bring  in  a  Resolve  holding  up  to 
the  People  the  imminent  danger  they  are  in 
from  the  present  disposition  of  the  British  Min- 
istry,        ....... 

Inhabitants  of  the  Province  requested  not  to  trade 
with  Pedlars,     .-.--. 

John  Whitcomb  elected  a  General  Officer, 

Militia  and  Minute  Men  earnestly  requested  to 
spare  neither  time,  pains,  nor  expense,  in  per- 
fecting themselves,  forthwith,  in  Military  Dis- 
cipline,     ..-...- 

Conduct  of  the  Committees  of  Correspondence 
of  Plymouth,  and  other  Towns,  approved,     - 

Conference  with  a  Committee  from  Connecticut, 
IG,      Committee  appointed  to  correspond    with    the 
neighbouring  Governments, 

Day  of  Fasting  and  Prayer  throughout  the  Prov- 
ince appointed,  -         -         -         -         -  1 342 

Injunction  of  Secrecy  on  the  Members  removed,  1343 

Adjourned  to  March  22d,  to  meet  at  Concord,     -  1343 
March  Met  conformable  to  adjournment,  and  the  Rev. 


-  1334 
1334 


-  1334 


1334 


1334 
-  1334 


1335 
1335 
1335 
1336 


1337 


-  1337 


-  1337 


-  1337 


-  1337 
1338 


1339 
-  1339 


1339 

1340 
1340 


1340 

1341 
1341 

-  1342 


1775. 

March 

30, 


April 
I, 


3, 


6, 


6, 


22, 


■24, 


27, 

28. 
29, 

30, 


Mr.  Emerson  appointed  Chaplain,         -         -  1343 

Debates  and  Resolutions  to  be  kept  an  entire 
secret, 

Committee  to  receive  the  Returns  of  the  Officers 
of  the  Militia,  ..... 

Any  relaxation  in  putting  the  Colony  in  a  com- 
plete state  of  Defence  will  be  attended  \vith  the 
-r.'.  utmost  danger  to  the  Liberties  of  the  Colony, 
and  of  all  America, 

Rules  and  Regulations  for  a  Constitutional  Army 
reported,  ...... 

Considered  and  recommitted,  ... 

Consideration  resumed;  recommitted  for  addi- 
tions,        -.--... 

Report  from  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Prov- 
ince relative  to  what  movement  of  the  Troops 
should  make  it  fit  to  call  the  Militia  together 
to  act  on  the  defensive,         ....  1345 


1344 


1344 


1344 

1345 
1345 

1345 


7, 


10, 
11, 


12, 


13, 


On  notice  for  assembling  the  Forces  of  the  Col- 
ony, the  Members  of  this  Congress  to  repair 
without  delay  to  the  place  to  which  they  shall 
be  adjourned,      ...---  1345 

Committees  to  sit  immediately,  that  the  Congress 
may  adjourn  to-morrow,      ...         -  1345 

Mandamus  Counsellors  who  have  refused  to  pub- 
lish a  renunciation  of  their  Commissions,       -  1346 

Report  of  Committee  appointed  to  receive  Returns 
from  the  several  Colonies,  recommitted,  -  1346 

Constables  and  Collectors  required  to  pay  Pub- 
lick  Moneys  immediately  to  the  Receiver  Gen- 
eral,   1346 

Committee  appointed  to  prepare  Rules  for  the 
Provincial  Army,  report.  Report  passed,  and 
afterwards  recommitted,       ....  1347 

Address  to  the  Stockbridge  Indians  who  have  en- 
listed as  Minute  Men,  ....  1347 

The  Towns  and  Districts  requested  to  choose 
Delegates  to  a  Provincial  Congress,  to  meet 
on  the  last  Wednesday  of  May,  if  Precepts  are 
not  issued  by  General  Gage,  calling  a  General 
Assembly  to  meet  on  that  day,       ...  1348 

Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Province  to  col- 
lect the  late  intelligence  from  Great  Britain, 
relative  to  sending  reinforcements  to  General 
Gage,  and  report  to  the  Congress  what  is  best 
to  be  done,  ......  1348 

Immediate  attendance  of  all  absent  Members  re- 
quired,     ....---  1348 

Letter  to  the  Reverend  Mr.  Kirkland,  with  an  Ad- 
dress to  the  Mohawks,         ....  1349 

Rules  and  Regulations  for  the  Massachusetts 
Army,      -        - 1350 

Committee  on  the  application  of  the  Committee 
from  Boston,  and  others,  report  that  the  Papers 
lie  for  further  consideration  at  some  future 
day, 1356 

Letter  to  the  Committee  of  Inspection  of  the 
County  of  Bristol,  advising  them  to  keep  the 
Militia,  and  especially  the  Minute  Men,  in  the 
best  posture  of  defence ;  but  that  they  act  on  the 
defensive  only,  until  the  further  direction  of  the 
Provincial  Congress,  ....  1356 

Application  from  Billerica,  and  from  the  Com- 
mittee of  Boston,  again  committed,         -         -  1357 

Conference  with  Governour  Hopkins,  on  the  pre- 
sent state  of  Pubiick  Affairs,         ...  1357 

Letter  to  the  Selectmen  of  Billerica.  Approve 
their  conduct  in  relation  to  the  assault  on 
Thomas  Ditson, 1357 

Letter  to  the  Committee  of  Correspondence  for 
Boston  and  other  Towns.  Request  that  the 
Militia  and  Minute  Men  act  only  on  the  defen- 
sive, until  the  further  order  of  the  Provincial 
Congress,  ......  1357 

Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Province  report 
relative  to  raising  and  establishing  an  Army ; 
and  that  Committees  repair  to   Connecticut, 
Rhode-Island,  and  New-Hampshire,  to  desire 
their  co-operation,       .....  1358 

Conmiittec  to  draught  a  Letter  to  each  of  the  Col- 
onies,       .......  135S 

Committee  to  consider  what  number  of  Men 
should  be  raised  by  the  four  New-England 
Governments,  for  their  general  defence,  -  1358 

Letter  to  the  Colonies  of  Connecticut,  Rhode- 
Island,  and  New- Hampshire,        -         -         -  1 359 

Instructions  to  the  Delegates  appointed  to  repair 

to  the  neighbouring  Governments,  -         -  1359 

Committee  to  take  into  consideration  the  particu- 
lar state  of  the  Town  of  Boston,  appointed,  after 
a  long  debate  on  the  propriety  of  advising  the 
Inhabitants  to  be  moved  from  thence,     -         -  1360 

County  Committees  appointed  to  report  a  true  state 
of  their  respective  Towns  and  Districts,  with 
respect  to  their  having  observed  the  Resolu- 
tions of  the  Continental  and  Provincial  Con- 
gresses, .....--  1361 
Report  of  the  Committee  on  the  state  of  the  Prov- 
ince, relative  to  exercising  the  Minute  Men  in 
Battalions,  and  paying  them  for  the  time  they 
spend  in  that  service ;  after  long  debate,  re- 
jected,         1361 

Committee  of  Safety  directed  to  form  six  Compa- 
nies of  Artillery,  to  be  in  readiness  to  enter  the 
service  of  the  Colony  when  the  Army  shall  be 
raised, 1362 


CI 

1-75. 
April  Report  from  the  Committee  to  consider  the  pro 

13,  priety  of  removing  the  Inhabitants  from  Bos- 
ton; after  long  debate,  recommitted,       -         -  1362 

1 4,  Committee  of  Donations  of  Boston  recommended  to 

afford  to  any  poor  persons  desirous  of  removing 
from  Boston,  such  assistance  as  may  enable 

them  to  do  it, 1362 

Committee  of  Safety  directed  to  apply  to  a  suit- 
able number  of  persons  to  be  in  readiness  to 
enter  the  service  of  the  Colony  as  Field  Offi- 
cers, when  an  Army  shall  be  raised,       -         -   1363 

15,  Day  of  Humiliation,  Fasting,  and  Prayer,  ap- 

pointed,    .-.--.-  1363 
The  Members,  on  their  return  to  their  respective 
Towns,  ordered  to  use  their  influence  to  pro- 
mote the  Military  Discipline,         ...  1364 
Adjourn  to  Wednesday,  the  10th  of  May  next,  to 
me«t  at  Concord,         .....  1364 


CONTENTS. 


CII 


1775. 


COMMITTEE  OF  SAFETY  OF  MASSACHUSETTS. 
1774. 

Nov.  2,  Committee  of  Supplies  requested  to  procure  and 
deposits  Provisions  at  Worcester  and  Con- 
cord,          1365 

8,  Committee  of  Supplies  requested  to  procure  all 
the  Arms  and  Ammunition  they  can,  in  the 
neighbouring  Provinces  on  the  Continent,  -  1365 
15,  Committee  to  get  seven  large  pieces  of  Cannon  out 
of  Boston,  to  some  place  in  the  country,  in 
such  manner  as  they  may  think  most  prudent,  1365 
Vec.     Committee  of  Supplies  to  procure  certain  Mihtary 

20,  Stores, 1366 

Committee  to  examine  the  Commissary's  Store  in 

Boston,  and  report  what  Surgeons'  Stores,  and 
Stores  of  other  kinds,  are  there,  -        -  1366 

1775. 

Jan.  5,  Eteacon  Cheever  authorized  to  receive  Cannon 

and  Mortars,       -.--.-  1366 
25,      All  the  Cannon,  Mortars,  Cannon  Ball,  and  Shells, 
to  be  deposited  in  Worcester  and  Concord,  in 
the  same  proportion  as  the  Provisions,  -  1366 

Feb.  3,  Committee  of  Supplies  directed  to  report  to  the 
Provincial  Congress  their  transactions  since 
their  appointment,       .         .         -         .         .  1367 

13,  Committee  of  Supplies  desired  to  purchase  all 

the  Powder  they  can,  ...         -  1367 

Committee  to  receive  from  Colonel  Robinson  four 
brass  Field-Pieces,  and  four  brass  Mortars, 
which,  in  case  of  a  rupture  with  the  Troops, 
shall  be  for  the  use  of  the  Artillery  Companies 
of  Boston  and  Dorchester,  ...   1367 

21,  Committee  of  Supplies  directed  to  procure  tea 

tons  of  Brimstone,  and  all  kinds  of  Warlike 
Stores,  sufficient  for  an  Army  of  fifteen  thou- 
sand Men  to  take  the  field,            ...  1357 
The  Powder  now  at  Concord,  to  be  removed  to 
Leicester, 1368 

22,  Committee  of  Supplies  directed  to  procure  one 

hundred  Bell  Tents  for  Arms,  one  thousand 
Field  Tents  for  Soldiers,  ten  tons  of  Lead  Balls, 
and  to  have  thirty  rounds  of  Cartridges  for  fif- 
teen thousand  Men,  made,  ...  1368 

On  arrival  of  more  Troops,  the  Province  Arms, 
at  Cambridge,  to  be  removed  to  Worcester,      1368 

On  intelligence  of  the  arrival  of  more  Troops,  the 
Provincial  Congress  to  be  assembled  imme- 
diately,       1368 

23,  Committee  to  direct  the  Commanding  Officers  of 

the  Militia  and  the  Minute  Men,  throughout 
die  Province,  to  assemble  one  fourth  part  of  the 
Militia  forthwith, 1368 

24,  Hospital  Stores  to  be  procured  and  sent  to  Con- 

cord,          1369 

March  Receiver  General  to  pay  to  Doctor  Warren  and 
7,         Doctor  Church,  five  hundred  Pounds,  for  the 
purchase  of  such  articles  for  the  Provincial 
Chests  of  Medicine,  as  cannot  be  got  on  credit,  1370 

14,  Watch  to  be  constantly  kept  at  the  places  where 

the  Provincial  Magazines  are  stored,     -         -  ]  370 
Watch  to  be  kept  at  Charlestown,  Cambridge, 
and  Roxbury,  and  Couriers  to  be  forwarded  to 
the  Towns  where  the  Magazines  are  placed, 
when  sallies  are  made  from  the  Army  by  night,  1370 
23,      Ton  of  Musket  Bullets  now  arrived  at  Concord, 

to  be  lodged  with  Colonel  Barrett,         -        .  1370 
April    The  Stores  at  Concord  and  elsewhere,  not  to  be 
1,         removed  without  written  orders  from  the  Com- 
mittee of  Safety, 1370 


Considerations  on  the  Measures  carrying  on  with 
respect  to  the  British  Colonies  in  North  Ame- 
rica,   1369 

Address  of  the  People  of  Great  Britain  to  the 
Inhabitants  of  America,       -         .         .         -  1413 

Taxation  no  Tyranny.  An  Answer  to  the  Re- 
solutions and  Address  of  the  American  Con- 


gress, 


-  1431 


An  Answer  to  a  Pamphlet,  entitled  "  Taxation  no 
Tyranny;"  addressed  to  the  Author,  and  to 
persons  in  power,         .....  1449 


PROCEEDINGS  OF  PARLIAMENT  ON  THE  ADDRESS  OF  THANKS 
TO  THE  KINO. 

1774.                              Howe  of  Lords. 
Nov.QQ,  Meeting  of  the  Fourteenth  Parliament,             -  1461 
State  of  Parties  in  England  in  relation  to  Ame- 
rica, (Note,) 1461 

House  of  Commons  required  to  attend  immedi- 
ately,           1461 

Lord  Chancellor's  Speech  to  both  Houses.  Com- 
mons directed  to  choose  a  Speaker,         -         -  1462 
30,     Sir  Fletcher  Norton  presented  to  the  King  as 

Speaker,  by  the  House  of  Commons,     -         -  1464 
Informed  by  the  Lord  Chancellor,  that  the  King 

approves  the  choice  made  by  the  Commons,     -  1464 
Address  of  the  Speaker,  claiming  the  Privileges 

of  the  Commons,         .....  1464 
Reply  of  the  Lord  Chancellor,  in  the  name  of  the 

King.     Allows  them  all  their  Privileges,      -  1465 
King's  Speech  to  both  Houses.     Informs  them 
that  a  most  daring  spirit  of  resistance  and  dis- 
obedience to  the  law,  still  prevails  in  the  Prov- 
ince of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,     -         -         -  1465 
Address  of  Thanks  to  the  King,  moved  by  the 

Earl  of  Hillsborough,         ....  1466 

Amendment  offered  by  the  Duke  of  Richmond,  1466 

Opposed  by  Lord  Lyttelton,  -         -         -  1 466 

Supported  by  Lord  Camden,  -        -  1467 

Amendment  rejected,  ....  1467 

Protest  on  rejection  of  the  amendment,  -  1467 

Earl  of  Hillsborough's  motion  agreed  to,  -  1468 

Committee  to  prepare  the  Address,  -        -  1468 

Address  reported  and  agreed  to,        -         -         -  1468 

Dec.  1,  Address  presented  to  the  King,  at  his  Palace,  at 

St.  James's, 1469 

The  King's  Answer,      .....  1469 

6,    Address  and  Answer  ordered  to  be  published,     -  1469 
House  of  Commons. 

iV(n).29,House  formed, 1469 

Sir  Fletcher  Norton  chosen  Speaker,        -        -  1470 
Dec.  5,  The  King's  Speech,  reported  to  the  House,  by  the 

Speaker, 1471 

Address  of  Thanks  to  the  ffing,  moved  by  Lord 
Beauchamp,      -        -        -        -        -        -1471 

Amendment  offered  by  Lord  John  Cavendish,    -  1472 

Debate— Lord  North, 1473 

Mr.  F.  Montague,     -        -        -        -  1473 

Go  vernour  Johnstone,         ...  1473 

Mr,  Charles  J.  Fox,  -         -         -  1473 

Mr.  Hartley,  ....  1473 

Colonel  Barre,  ....  1473 

Sir  George  Macartney,      ...  1473 

Lord  Carmarthen,     ....  I473 

Sir  William  Mayne,  -         -         -  1473 

General  Smith,  -         -         -         -  1473 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,  -        -        -  1474 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke,  -        -        -  1474 

Mr.  Van, 1474 

Mr.  Wedderburn,      .        -        -        -  1474 

Amendment  rejected,      .....  I474 

Lord  Beauchamp's  motion  agreed  to,         -         -  1474 

Committee  to  draw  up  the  Address,  -         -  1474 

6,  Address  reported  and  agreed  to,        -         -         -  1474 

7,  Presented  to  the  King,             ....  1476 
King's  Answer  to  the  Address,        ...  1476 


ON  SUPPLIES  FOR  THE  YEAR  1775. 

House  of  Commons. 
Dec.  7,  The  King's  Speech  considered,        ...  1475 

8,  House  in  Committee  on  the  motion  to  grant  a 

Supply  to  his  Majesty,         -         -         -         -  1475 

9,  Committee  of  the  Whole  report  that  a  Supply  be 

granted,  1476 

12,     House  in  Committee  to  consider  of  the  Supply 

granted  to  his  Majesty,        ....  1475 


CONTENTS. 


CIV 


cm 

1774 

Dec.  1-2,  Mr.  Buller's  motion  that  16,000  Men  be  employ- 
ed for  the  Sea  Service,  for  the  year  1775,        -  U76 
Debate— Mr.  T.  TowTishcnd,  -         -         -  1476 

Mr.  BuUer, '476 

Mr.  Lmtrell, }477 

Colonel  Barr6,  ...        -  1477 

Mr.  Hartley,  -        -        -        -  1477 

Mr.  Duller,"     -         -         -  -  1477 

Mr.  Luttrell, {477 

Mr.  Buller's  motion  agreed  to,  ■        '  ,  ,  " 

13,  Resolutions  reported  from  the  Committee  of  the 
Whole,  for  the  employment  and  pay  of  16,000 
Seamen,  and  airreed  to  by  the  House,  -  1477 

Debate— Lord  John  Cavendish,  -  -  "  j478 
Lord  Beauchamp,  -  -  -  •  \^'° 
Mr.  Cornwall,  -        -        "        '  }f;° 

Mr.  Burke, jf^° 

Sir  William  Mayne,  -        -        '  \%i 

Mr.  Hartley,  -         -         -         "  j^'.S 

Lord  Beauchamp,  •  -  -  -  147  J 
Lord  John  Cavendish,  -  •  -  1479 
Lord  Beauchamp,  -  -  -  ■  J  479 
Captain  Luttrell,  -  -  -  "  1479 
Mr.  Rose  Fuller,      -         -         -         *  14"9 

16,  House  in  Committee  to  consider  further  of  the 

Supply  granted  to  his  Majesty,     -         -        -  1479 

Lord   Barrington's  motion,  that   17,547   Men, 

Commission  and  Non-Commission  Officers 

included,  be  employed  for  the  year  1775,       -  1479 

Debate— Mr.  Rose  Fuller,      .        -        -        -  1479 

Lord  Barrington,      -        -        -        -  1479 

Mr.  Fuller, 1479 

Lord  North, 1479 

Mr.  T.  Tow-nshend,  -        -        -  1479 

Lord  North, 1479 

Go  vernour  Johnstone,        -        -        -  1479 

Mr.  Fox, 1482 

Lord  Clare, 1482 

Mr.  Rigby, 1482 

Mr.  Cruger, 1482 

Sir  William  Mayne,  -        -        -  1484 

Lord  North, 1484 

Mr.  Hartley,  ....  1484 

Lord  Barrington's  motion  agreed  to,         -        -  1484 

17,  Resolutions  reported  from  the  Committee  of  the 

Whole  read  and  agreed  to,  ...  1484 

19,  Resolution  for  providing  Ways  and  Means  for 
raising  the  Supply  granted  to  his  Majesty,  re- 
ported to  the  House  from  the  Committee  of  the 

Whole, 1485 

Debate— Lord  North, 1485 

Mr.  Hartley,  ....  1485 

Mr.  Rose  Fuller,  ....  I486 
Mr.  T.  Townshend,  -        -        -  1486 

Mr.  Rigby, 1486 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke,  -  -  -  1486 
Sir  William  Meredith,       -        -        -  1487 

Mr.  Burke, 1488 

Mr.  Cornwall,  ....  1488 

Resolution  providing  Ways  and  Means,  agreed  to,  1488 
Inesolution  of  the  Cabinet,  (Note,)  -        -  1488 

22,    Parliament  adjourned  to  the  19th  day  of  January 

next, 1488 


1775. 
ON  THE  BILL  FOR  SETTLING  THE  TROUBLES  IN  AMERICA. 

House  of  Commons. 
Feb.  1,  Provisional  Act  for  settling  the  Troubles  in  Ame- 
rica, and  for  asserting  the  Supreme  Legislative 
authority  and  superintending  power  of  Great 
Britain  over  the  Colonies,  presented  by  Lord 

Chatham, -  1503 

Lord  Chatham's  Speech  on  presenting  the  Bill,  1503 
Earl  of  Dartmouth's  Reply,  -  -  -  -  1504 
Bill  read  the  first  time,  ....  1504 

Objections  to  the  Bill  in  America,  (Note,)  -  1505 

Motion  by  the  Earl  of  Sandwch  "  That  the  Bill 

be  rejected," 1507 

Debate — Lord  Lyttelton,         ....  1507 
Earl  of  Shelburne,  -         -         -  1508 

Duke  of  Grafton,     -        -        -        -  1508 
Earl  Gower,  ....  1509 

Lord  Chatham,  ....  1509 

Earl  Gower,  -        -        -        -  1510 

Lord  Camden,  ....  1510 

Earl  of  Chatham,     ...        -  1510 
Earl  Gower,  -         -         -         -  1511 

Earl  of  Hillsborough,        -         -         -1511 
Duke  of  Richmond,  -        -        -  1512 

Duke  of  Manchester,  -        -        -  1513 

Earl  Temple,  -        -        -        -  1513 

Question  on  the  motion  of  the  Earl  of  Sandwich 

taken,  and  the  Bill  rejected,          ...  1514 
List  of  the  Minority, 1514 


Jan. 
19, 


23, 


ON  LORD  CHATHAM  S  MOTION  TO  RECALL  THE  TROOPS 
FROM  BOSTON. 

1775.  House  of  Lords. 

Jan.    Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  North 
20,        America,  presented  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth, 

by  his  Majesty's  command,  ...  1489 

Lord  Chatham's  motion  to  recall  the  Troops 
from  Boston,      ......  1498 

Debate— Lord  Chatham,         ....  1493 

Earl  of  Suffolk,        ....  1498 

Earl  of  Shelburne,  -        -        -  1499 

Lord  Lyttelton,         ....  1500 

Lord  Camden,  -        -        -        -  1501 

Lord  Chatham,         -        -        -        -  1501 

Lord  Townshend,     ....  1502 

Earl  of  Rochford,     -         -         -         -  1502 

Earl  Gower,  -         -         -         -  1502 

Marquis  of  Rockingham,  -         -  1502 

Duke  of  Richmond,  -         -         -  1503 

Earl  of  Rochford,  •         -         -  1503 

Lord  Weymouth,      ....  1504 

Lord  Chatham's  motion  rejected,       ...  1504 
List  of  the  Minority,       -         -  -        -  1504 

Energy  of  the  Cabinet,  (Note,)        -        -        -  1499 


24. 


25, 


ON  THE  PETITIONS  RELATING  TO  AMERICA. 

House  of  Commons. 

Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  North 

America,  presented  by  Lord  North,  -  -  1513 
Lord  North's  Explanations  relative  to  the  Papers,  1513 
Papers  referred  to  a  Committee  of  the  Whole 

House,     .        -        .        -        - 
Petition  from  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others, 
of  the  City  of  London,  concerned  in  the  Com- 
merce of  North  America,  presented, 
Mr.  Alderman  Hayley's  motion,  that  the  Petition 
be  referred  to  the  Committee  of  the  Whole 
House,  to  whom  the  Papers  from  North  Ame- 
rica had  been  referred,         .... 
Sir  William  Meredith's  motion  to  amend,  so  as  to 

refer  to  a  separate  Committee, 
Debate — Mr.  Burke, 

Sir  Gilbert  Elliot,     - 
Mr.  T.  Townshend, 
Lord  Clare,      ... 
Mr.  Fox,         ... 
Lord  John  Cavendish, 
Lord  North,     - 
Sir  George  Macartney, 
Captain  Luttrell, 
Lord  Stanley, 
Motion  to  amend  agreed  to. 
The   Petition  referred  to  a  Committee  of  the 
Whole  House,  ..... 

Petition  of  the  Master,  Wardens,  and  Commonalty 
of  the  Society  of  Merchants  and  Venturers  of 
the  City  of  Bristol,  presented  by  Mr.  Burke, 
Motion  to  refer  it  to  the  Committtee  of  the  Whole 
House,  to  whom  has  been  referred  the  Papers 
from  America,  ..... 

Debate — Lord  North, 

Mr.  Burke, 

Lord  North, 

Governour  Johnstone,        ... 
Motion  amended,  and  the  Petition  referred  to  the 
Committee  of  the  Whole  House,  to  whom  the 
Petition  of  the  Merchants  of  London  is  referred, 
Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  Manu- 
facturers of  the  City  of  Bristol,  presented  by 
Mr.  Cruger,      ...... 

Petition  of  the  Merchants  and  Traders  of  the 
City  of  Glasgow,  presented,  ... 

Statements  of  the  Value  of  Exports  from  Great 
Britain  to  the  Colonies,  from  1772  to  1774,  or- 
dered to  be  laid  before  the  House, 
Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Manufacturers,  and 
Traders,  and  other  Inhabitants  of  the  City  of 
Norwich,  presented. 
Petition  of  the  Merchants  and  Mantifacturers  re- 
siding in  the  Town  and  Neighbourhood  of 
Dudley,  in  the  County  of  Worcester,  present 


-  1513 


1513 


1515 

1515 
1516 
1516 
1517 
1517 
1517 
1517 
1517 
1517 
1517 
1518 
1518 

1519 


1519 


1520 
1520 
1520 
1520 

1520 


1521 


1521 
1522 


-  1522 


-  1523 


ed. 


1523 


3, 


6. 


ev  CONTENTS. 

1775. 
Jan.25,  Petition  from  the  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  and 

Neighbourhood  of  Birmingham,  -         -  1524 

Sir  George  Savile  offers  to  present  a  Petition 
from  Dr.  Franklin,  Mr.  Lee,  and  Mr.  Bollan, 
requesting  to  be  heard  before  the  House,  on  the 
Petition  from  the  Congress  to  the  King,  -   1524 

26,  Stotemcnts  of  the  Value  of  Exports  and  Imports 

to  and  from  North  America,  and  the  West  In- 
dies, from  the  year  17G2,  ordered  to  be  laid  be- 
fore the  House,  -         -         -         -         -   1 525 
Second  Petition  from  the  Merchants,  Traders, 
and  others,  of  the  City  of  London,  concerned 
in  the  Commerce  of  North  America,  present- 
ed by  Alderman  Hay  ley,     .         .         -         .  1525 
Motion,  by  Mr.  Hayley,  for  discharging  the  Order 
of  Monday  last,  for  referring  the  Petition  of  the 
Merchants,  and  others,  of  London,  to  a  Com- 
mittee of  the  Whole  House,  ...  1526 
Debate— Mr.  Hayley,              -         -        -         -1526 
Mr.  Hotham,             -         -         -         -  1526 
Mr.  Hans  Stanley,  -        -         -  1526 
Mr.  Hayley,              ....   1527 
Mr.  T.  Tovvnshend,          -        -        -  1527 

Mr.  Lewis, 1527 

Mr.  Jenkinson,  ....  1527 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke,  .        -         •  1527 

Mr.  Fox, 1529 

Colonel  Barrd,  -        -         -         -  1529 

Mr.  Wedderburn,     ...        -  1529 

Lord  North, 1529 

Lord  George  Germain,     ...  1530 

Mr.  Fox, 1530 

Lord  North, 1530 

Mr.  Hayley's  motion  rejected,  ...  1530 

Petition  referred  to  same  Committee  with  the 

others, 1530 

Petition  of  the  Merchants  and  Manufacturers  of 

the  Town  of  Manchester,  presented,       -         -  1530 
Petition  from  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  Manu- 
facturers of  Wolverhampton,  in  the  County  of 
Stafford,  presented,      -         -         -         -         -1531 
Petition  of  the  Merchants  and  Tradesmen  of  the 

Port  of  Liverpool,  presented,         -         -         -  1531 
Petition  of  William  Bollan,  Benjamin  Franklin, 
and  Arthur  Lee,  requesting  they  may  be  heard 
at  the  Bar  of  the  House,  on  the  Petition  from 
America,  offered  by  Sir  George  Savile,  -  1532 

Motion  for  receiving  the  Petition  rejected,  -  1532 

Notice  of  the  Debate  on  this  Question,  (Note,)       1532 
House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,      1533 

27,  Statements  of  Exports  from  England  to  the  Colo- 

nies in  North  America,  in  1773,  presented,     -  1533 

Petition  of  sundry  Merchants,  Factors,  and 
Manufacturers,  of  Birmingham,  in  the  County 
of  Warwick,  presented,        ....  1533 

House  in  Committee,  on  the  Petition  from  the 
Merchants,  and  others,  of  London,  concerned 
in  the  Commerce  of  North  America,     .         -  1533 

Reasons  of  the  Merchants,  for  declining  to  be 
heard  at  the  Bar  of  the  House,     -         -         -  1534 

House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,      1534 
31,     Papers  presented  by  Lord  North,     ...  1534 

Statements  of  Imports  and  Exports  of  British 
Plantation  Tobacco,  ordered  to  be  laid  before 
the  House, 1535 

Petition  of  the  Manufacturers  of  Felt  Hats,  and 
Dealers  therein;  as  also,  of  the  Shoemakers,  in 
the  Town  of  New-Castle,  in  the  County  of  Staf- 
ford, presented,  .....  I535 

Petition  of  the  Manufacturers  and  Traders  in 
Earthen  Ware,  residing  in  Burslem,  Tunstall, 
Colridge,  Shelton,  Hanly,  Stoke-Lane,  Dclf- 
Lane-End,  and  places  adjacent,  in  the  County 
of  Stafford,  presented,  ....  I535 

Mr.  Burke's  motion  for  an  Inquiry  into  the  man- 
ner in  which  the  Petition  from  Birmingham, 
presented  on  the  25th,  was  procured,     -        -  1536 

Debate  on  the  motion,     -         .        -        .         .  1536 

Mr.  Burke's  motion  rejected,  ...  I537 

House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,      1537 
Feb.  1,  Petition  of  the  Mayor,  Recorder,  Aldermen,  and 
Assistants,  of  the  Borough  of  Leeds,  in  the 
County  of  York,  presented,  -         -         .  1537 

Petition  of  the  Merchants  of  Leeds,  trading  to  the 
North  American  Colonies,  or  having  property 
there,  presented,  .....  I538 

Papers  presented  by  Lord  North,     ...  I539 

House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,     1539 


CVI 

1775. 
Feb.  2,  Petition  of  the  Planters  of  his  Majesty's  Sugar 
Colonies,  residing  in  Great  Britain,  and  of  the 
Merchants  of  London,  trading  to  the  said  Colo- 
nies, presented,  -        .        .        .        -1540 


ON  A  JOINT  ADDRESS  OF  THE  TWO  HOUSES  TO  THE  KING. 

House  of  Commons. 

Feb.  2,  House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,  1541 
Motion  of  Lord  North,  for  an  Address  to  the 
King,  declaring  the  Province  of  Massachusetts 

Bay  in  actual  rebellion,       .         -         .         .  1542 

Debate — Mr.  Dunning,  ....  I542 

Mr.  Attorney  General  Thurlow,         -  1543 

Colonel  Grant,  ....  I543 

Amendment  proposed  by  Mr.  Fox,  -         -  1543 

Debate — Mr.  Grenville,  .        .        .        .1544 

Mr.  Cruger, 1544 

Captain  Luttrell,       ....  I544 

Mr.  Cosmo  Gordon,  .        -        -  1547 

Mr.  Burke, 1547 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderburn,     -  1547 

Amendment  offered  by  Mr.  Fox,  rejected,  -  1547 

Lord  North's  motion  for  an  Address,  adopted,     -  1547 
Statements  of  the  Imports  and  Exports  of  the 
Sugar  Colonies,  ordered  to  be  laid  before  the 

House, 1547 

Accounts  of  Imports  and  Exports  presented,         -  1548 
Report  from  Committee  of  the  Whole,  on  the 

American  Papers.     Address  to  the  King,      -  1548 
Motion,  by  Lord  John  Cavendish,  that  the  Report 

be  recommitted,  .         -         -         .         .  I549 

Debate — Lord  John  Cavendish,       ...  I549 

Lord  Lumley,  -         -         .         .  I549 

Mr.  Wilkes,  (the  Lord  Mayor,)  -  1549 

Captain  Harvey,       ....  I552 

Sir  William  Mayne,  ...  I554 

Mr.  T.  Tovvnshend,  .        -        -  1556 

Mr.  Joliffe, 1556 

Mr.  Hans  Stanley,    ....  1556 

Lord  Irnham,  .         -         .         .  1556 

Mr.  William  Adam,         -        -        -  1559 

Mr.  Scott, 1559 

Governour  Johnstone,         ...  I559 

Sir  Robert  Smythe,  -         -         -  1564 

Mr.  Burke, 1564 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderburn,     .  1565 

Colonel  Barre,  ...         -  1565 

Lord  North, 1565 

Mr.  Mackworth,      ....  1565 

Mr.  Sawbridge,         ....  1565 

Motion  to  recommit  the  Report  rejected,    -        -  1565 

Amendment  proposed  and  rejected,  -        -  1565 

Resolution  reported  by  Committee  of  the  Whole 

agreed  to,  ......  1566 

Committee  to  draw  up  an  Address,            -        -  1566 
Address  reported  and  agreed  to,        .         -         -  1566 
To  be  communicated  to  the  Lords,  at  a  Confer- 
ence,   1566 

Conference  with  the  Lords  requested,        -        -  1566 
House  in  Committee,  on  the  American  Papers,  1566 
The  Address  presented  to  the  Lords  in  Confer- 
ence,        ..-..--  1567 
Managers  of  the  two  Houses  in  Conference  on 
the  Address.     The  Lords  agree  to  make  it  a 
Joint  Address,             .....  1567 
The  King  has  appointed  to-morrow  to  receive 

the  Address, 1567 

Petition  of  the  Manufacturing  Hosiers,  of  the 

Town  and  County  of  Nottingham,  presented,  1567 
Lord  North's  motion,  to  postpone  the  further  con- 

sideration  of  the  American  Papers  to  the  10th,  1568 

Debate— Mr.  Fox, 1568 

Lord  North, 1568 

Consideration  of  Petitions  postponed  to  the  15th, 

and  of  American  Papers  to  the  1 0th,      -         -  1568 
The  King's  Answer  to  the  Joint  Address  of  the 

two  Houses,  presented  yesterday,  -        -  1569 

Hoiise  of  Lords. 
Feb.  2,  Papers  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  America, 
considered,         .--.-- 
Further  considered,         "         "         "        "         ' 
Message  from  the  Commons,  desiring  a  Confer- 
ence with  this  House,  upon  the  state  of  his 
Majesty's  Colonies  in  America, 
Managers  of  the  Conference  appointed,      - 
The  two  Houses  in  Conference, 


7, 


10, 


3, 
7, 


1569 
1569 


1569 
1569 
1570 


-  1570 

0 

-  1571 

1571 
1571 

1572 
1572 
1572 
1572 
1573 
1574 
1575 
1576 
1576 
1577 
1578 
1578 
1578 
1579 
1579 
1579 
1580 
1581 
1581 
1582 
1583 
1584 
1584 
1584 
1584 
1584 
1584 

1585 
1585 
1585 

1586 
1586 


1587 


1588 
1589 


1590 
1590 


1621 
1589 


1589 
1589 
1590 
1591 
1591 
1591 
1591 
1591 
1592 
1595 
1595 
1595 


cvii  CONTENTS. 

1775. 

Feb.  7,  Address  delivered  at  the  Conference,  reported  by 
the  Lord  President,    .        .        .        - 
Motion,  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  to  agree  to 
the  Address,       .        .        .        .        - 

Marquis  of  Rockingham's  motion  for  the  Previ^ 
ous  Question,     --.--• 
Debate — Marquis  of  Rockingham, 

Earl  of  Pomfret,        .... 

Earl  of  Denbigh,      .... 

Earl  Gower.  .... 

Lord  Mansfield,        .... 

Lord  Camden,  .... 

Duke  of  Grafton,      .... 

Lord  Mansfield,        .... 

Lord  Lyttelton,         .... 

Duke  of  Richmond, 

Lord  Mansfield,        .... 

Lord  Lyttelton,         .... 

Earl  of  Rochford,     .... 

Earl  of  Shelburne, 

Lord  Mansfield,        .... 

Earl  of  Shelburne, 

Duke  of  Richmond,  -         -         - 

Earl  of  Sandwich,     .... 

Duke  of  Richmond, 

Earl  of  Sandwich,     .... 

Bishop  of  Peterborough, 
Duke  of  Richmond,  ... 

Duke  of  Manchester,         ... 
Lord  Ljntelton,         .... 

Lord  Mansfield,        .... 

Lord  Camden,  .... 

Earl  of  Dartmouth,  ... 

Notice  of  the  Debate,  (Note,)  ... 

Previous  Question  put,  and  resolved  in  the  Af- 
firmative, ...... 

List  of  the  Minority,  (Note,)  ... 

Protest, 

The  Main  Question,  on  agreeing  to  the  Address 
put,  and  resolved  in  the  Affirmative, 

Protest, 

Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others, 
concerned  in  the  American  Commerce,  read, 
and  laid  on  the  table,  .... 

Petition  of  tlie  Planters  of  his  Majesty's  Sugar 
Colonies,  residing  in  Great  Britain,  and  of  the 
Merchants  of  London,  trading  to  the  said  Colo- 
nies, read,  and  laid  on  the  table. 
Statements  of  Imports  and  Exports,  ordered  to  be 
laid  before  the  House,  .... 

8,  The  Lords  informed  the  King  will  receive  the 
Joint  Address  of  the  two  Houses  to-morrow, 
at  his  Palace  of  St.  James,  -        .        . 

10,     The  King's  Answer  to  the  Address  presented 
yesterday,  ...... 

ON  ADDITIONAL  SUPPLIES  FOR  THE  YEAR  1775. 

House  of  Commons. 
FeA.  10,  Message  from  the  King,  requesting  additional 
Forces  by  Sea  and  Land,     .... 

13,  House  in  Committee,  to  consider  further  of  the 

Supply  granted  to  his  Majesty,     - 
Mr.  Buller's  motion,  that  an  additional  number, 
of  2,000  Men,  be  allowed  for  the  Sea  Service, 
for  the  year  1775,       •        .         .         .         1 

Debate — Lord  North, 

Governour  Johnstone,        ... 

Lord  North, 

Lord  John  Cavendish, 
Mr.  Cornwall,  .... 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,     .... 
Captain  Walsingham,        ... 
Mr.  Temple  Luttrell, 
Mr.  Sawbridge,         .... 
Mr.  Buller's  motion  agreed  to,  ... 

14,  House  in  Committee, 

Lord  Barrington's  motion,  to  augment  the  Land 

Forces  with  4,383  Men,  Officers  and  Non- 
Commission  Officers  included,      . 
After  Debate,  agreed  to,  ... 


1596 
1590 


ON  LORD  north's  RESOLUTION  FOR  RECONCILIATION. 

House  of  Commons. 

rd>.20,House  in  Committee,  on  American  Papers,        -  1597 

Lord  North's  Conciliatory  Resolution,      -'        .  I598 
Remarks  on  the  introduction  of  this  Resolution. 

(Note-) -  1598 


CVIU 

1775. 

Feb.2Q,  Debate— Lord  North, 1597 

Governour  Pownall,  ...  1600 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,  ....  1605 
Mr.  Jenkinson,  ....  1606 

Mr.  Welbore  Ellis,  -         .         .  1606 

JNIr.  Adam, 1606 

Mr.  Cornwall,  ....  1607 

Mr.  Ackland,  ....  1607 

Mr.  Dundas,  ....  1607 

Sir  Gilbert  Elliot,  ....  1607 
Colonel  Barre,  ....  1607 

Lord  North, 1608 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke,  -        .        -  1608 

Mr.  Dunning,  ....  1610 

Question  taken,  and  resolved  in  the  Affirmative,  1610 
To  be  reported  to  the  House  on  Friday  morning 

next, 1610 

Authentick  Speech  of  Lord  North,  on  introdu- 
cing the  Resolution,  (Note,)          ...  1599 
Circumstantial  account  of  the  Debates  in  the 
American  Committee,  on  Lord  North's  mo- 
tion, (Note,) 1600 

Lord   North's  explanation  of   his    Resolution, 

(Note,) 1602 

24,     Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole  deferred  to 

Monday  next,     ---...  1610 
27,    Resolution  of  the  Committee  of  the  Whole  re- 
ported to  the  House,  ....  I6II 
Lord  North's  motion  to  agree  to  the  Resolution,  1611 

Debate — Mr.  Scott, 1611 

Mr.  Ackland,  .         .         -         -  1611 

Mr.  Temple  Luttrell,  -  .  -  1613 
Sir  P.  J.  Clerke,  ....  1617 
Mr.  Hartley,  -         .         .         .1617 

Mr,  Thomas  Powys,         •        -        .1618 

Lord  North, 1619 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,  .        .        -  1619 

Sir  Richard  Sutton,  -         .         .1619 

Mr.  Charles  Turner,  .         .         .  1619 

Mr.  Hans  Stanley,  ...  1619 

Mr.  Alderman  Sawbridge,  .        -  1619 

General  Burgoyne,  .         .         .1619 

Governour  Johnstone,        -         -         .   1622 
Question  taken,  and  Resolution  agreed  to,  -   1622 

ON    THE    BILL    FOR    RESTRAINING    THE    TRADE    OF    THE 
NORTHERN  COLONIES. 


House  of  Commons. 
fe J.  10,  House  in  Committee,  on  American  Papers, 

Lord  North's  motion,  for  leave  to  bring  in  a  Bill 
to  Restrain  the  Trade  of  the  Northern  Colo- 
nies,        --..... 

Debate — Lord  North, 

Mr.  Dunning,  .... 

Mr.  Attorney  General  Thurlow, 

Mr.  Solicitor  General  Wedderbum,    - 

Mr.  Speaker  Norton,        ... 

Governour  Johnstone, 

Mr.  T.  Townshend, 

Sir  George  Savile,  ... 

Sir  W.  Meredith,     .... 

Lord  John  Cavendish,        ... 

Lord  Beauchamp,     .... 

Mr,  Burke, 

Lord  North's  motion  agreed  to,        .        .        . 
Report  of  Committee  of  the  Whole, 
Leave  granted,  and  Committee  appointed,  to  bring 
in  a  Bill  to  Restrain  the  Trade  and  Commerce 
of  Massachusetts,  New- Hampshire,  Connecti- 
cut, and  Rhode-Island,  and  to  prohibit  such 
Colonies  from  carrying  on  any  Fisherj'  on 
the  Banks  of  Newfoundland,  or  other  places, 
therein  to  be  mentioned,       .... 
Statements  of  Duties  and  Excise  on  Imports  and 
Exports  of  West  India  Produce,  and  of  the 
Tonnage  of  all  Vessels  employed  in  the  Trade 
between  Great  Britain  and  the  Colonies,  order- 
ed to  be  laid  before  the  House,     ... 
Accounts  of  Exports  presented,         ... 
Consideration  of  the  Petition  of  Merchants,  and 
others,  of  London,  concerned  in  the  Commerce 
of  America,  postponed  to  the  8th  of  March, 
Statements  of  Exports  and  Imports,  ordered  to  be 
laid  before  the  House,  .... 

Petition  of  the  principal  Manufacturers  of  the 
Borough  of  Bridgeport,  in  the  County  of  Dor- 
set, on  behalf  of  themselves,  and  thousands  of 


1622 


1622 
1622 
1623 
1623 
1623 
1623 
1623 
1624 
1624 
1624 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1626 
1626 


13. 
15, 


1626 


1626 
1626 


1627 
1627 


CIX 


1775. 


CONTENTS. 


ex 


others,  Inhabitants  of  the  said  Borough,  and 
places  adjacent,  presented,  -         -         -  1 627 

JVi.  15,  Letter  from    Lord    Dunmore,  dated   December 

24,  1774,  presented  by  Lord  North,      -         -   1628 

Petition  of  the  Merchants  and  Master  Manufac- 
turers of  Woollen  Goods,  of  the  Towns  of 
Wakefield,  Halifax,  Bradford,  Huddersfield, 
and  Country  adjacent,  interested  in  the  Trade 
to  America,  presented,         ....  1628 

Accounts  of  Imports  and  Exports  of  Sugar  pre- 
sented,       1629 

17,  Address  to  the  King,  that  he  will  direct  to  be  laid 
before  the  House,  an  Act  of  Assembly  of  Vir- 
ginia, passed  in  the  year  1684,     ...  1629 

Bill  to  Restrain  the  Trade,  and  prohibit  the  Fish- 
eries of  the  Northern  Colonies,  presented  by 
Lord  North, 1629 

Second  reading  ordered  for  Thursday,       -         -  1629 

American  Papers  to  be  considered  in  Committee 
of  the  Whole,  on  Monday,  the  20th,     -         .1629 
20,     Accounts  of  Imports  and  Exports  presented,       .   1630 
22,     Petition  of  the  Merchants  of  Whitehaven,  in  the 

County  of  Cumberland,       ....   1630 

Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Linen  Drapers,  and 
principal  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  and  Neigh, 
bourhood  of  Belfast,  in  the  Kingdom  of  Ire. 
land,  presented,  .         .         .         -         -.1631 

Petition  of  the  Aldermen,  Sheriff,  principal 
Manufacturers,  and  Inhabitants  of  the  Town 
and  County  of  Nottingham,  presented,  -  1631 

"  Act  for  the  better  preservation  of  the  Peace  of 
Virginia,  and  preventing  Unlawful  and  Trea- 
sonable Associations,"  passed  by  the  Assem- 
bly of  Virginia,  on  the  16th  of  April,  1684, 
presented,  (Note,) 1632 

Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others, 
of  the  City  of  London,  interested  in  the  Ame- 
rican Commerce,  presented,  ...   i633 

Second  reading  of  the  Bill  postponed  until  to- 
morrow,   1634 

24,  Letter  from  General  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, dated  January  18,  presented  by  Lord 
North, 1634 

Other  Papers  from  America  presented,      -         -  1634 

Petition  of  the   Lord   Mayor,   Aldermen,   and 
Commons,  of  the  City  of  London,  in  Common  ' 
Council  convened,  presented  at  the  Bar  of  the 
House,  by  the  Sheriffs  of  the  City,        -        -  1635 

Bill  read  second  time,  and  committed  to  Com- 
mittee of  the  Whole,  ....  1636 

Petition  of  Merchants,  of  London,  referred  to 
same  Committee,  and  may  be  heard  by  them- 
selves, their  Counsel,  or  Agents,  against  the 
Bill, 1636 

City  Petition  referred  to  the  same  Committee,    -  1637 
28,     Petition  of  the  People  called  duakers  presented,  1637 

Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  principal 
Inhabitants  of  the  Town  and  County  of  Poole, 
presented,  ......   i637 

House  in  Committee,  on  the  Bill,    ...  1638 

David  Barclay,  as  Agent  for  the  Committee  of 
the  North  American  Merchants,  called  in,  to 
examine  Witnesses  in  support  of  their  Peti- 
tion,          1638 

Examination  of  Brook  Watson,      ...  1638 

Examination  of  Stephen  Higginson,         -         -  1645 

Examination  of  John  Lane,     ....  1648 

Examination  of  Seth  Jenkins,  ...  1650 

March  Account  of  the  Imports  of  Tobacco  into  Scotland, 
I,  from  1760  to  1775,  presented,       .         .         -  1651 

Account  of  Imports  and  Exports  presented,  -   1651 

House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,      ...  i651 
6,      Bill  reported  to  the  House  from  the  Committee 

of  the  Whole,  1651 

Examination  of  Benjamin  Lister,  in  support  of 
the  Petition  from  Poole,       .         .         .         .1651 

Motion  made  for  the  engrossment  of  the  Bill,     -  1653 

Debate — Lord  Howe, 1653 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,  ....  1553 
Mr.  Jenkinson,  ...   1553 

Mr.  T.  Town.shpnd,  ...  1654 

Mr.  Henry  Dundas,  -         -         .  1654 

Lord  John  Cavendish,  ...  1554 
Mr.  Rice,  .  -  -  -  .  1654 
Mr.  Edmund  Burke,  .         -         -  1654 

Lord  Advocate  of  Scotland,  -         -  1656 

Question  taken,  and  resolved  in  the  Affirmative,  1657 

Third  reading  ordered  for  Wednesday  next,        -  1657 


1657 


1657 
1657 
1658 
1659 
1659 
1659 
1659 
1660 
1660 
1660 
1660 


1775. 

jWar.8,  Bill  read  the  third  time,  .... 

Amendment  offered  by  Mr.  Hartley,  to  permit 

the  Colonies  to  import  Fuel  and  Provisions 

brought  coastwise  from  any  part  of  America, 

Debate — Mr.  Hartley,  .... 

Lord  North,     ..... 

Mr.  Burke, 

Lord  Clare,  ..... 
Mr.  T.  Townshend, 
Mr.  Charles  Fox,  .... 
Governour  Pownall,  ... 
Mr.  Henry  Dundas,  ... 
Question  on  the  Amendment  taken,  and  rejected, 
Bill  VasseA, 

House  of  Lords. 

March  Bill  to  Restrain  the  Trade  of  the  Northern  Colo- 
9,  nies,  received  from  the  Commons,  .         .  1661 

10,     Second  reading  of  the  Bill  ordered  for  Wednesday 

the  I5th,  and  the  Lords  summoned,        .         .  1661 

15,  Petition  of  the  Lord  Mayor,  Aldermen,  and  Com- 

mons, of  the  City  of  London,  in  Common  Coun- 
cil assembled,     ......  1661 

Petition  of  the  Merchants,  Traders,  and  others,  of 
the  City  of  London,  interested  in  the  American 

Commerce, 1661 

Bill  read  the  second  time,  ....  1663 
House  refuse  to  permit  Mr.  Barclay  to  put  Ques- 
tions to  the  witnesses,  ....  1663 
Seth  Jenkins  examined,  ....  1663 
Brook  Watson  examined,  ....  1667 
Benjamin  Lyster  examined,  ....  1668 
George  Davis  examined,  ....  1669 
Molyneux  Shuldham  examined,  ...  1669 
Sir  Hugh  Palliser  examined,  -         .         .  1670 

16,  Motion  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  to  commit  the 

Bill, 1670 

Debate — Marquis  of  Rockingham,  -         .  1670 

Earl  of  Carlisle,  ....  1673 
Duke  of  Manchester,  -  .  .  1673 
Earl  of  Denbigh,  ....  1674 
Duke  of  Manchester,  ...  1674 
Earl  of  Denbigh,  ....  1674 
Viscount  Dudley,  .  -  .  .  1675 
Lord  Camden,  ....  1675 

Earl  of  Sandwich,  (see  Note,)  -  -1681 
Earl  of  Shelburne,  -         •         .  1683 

Earl  of  Suffolk,  -  •  .  .  .  1684 
Earl  of  Radnor,  ....  1684 
Earl  of  Suflblk,  ....  1684 
Earl  of  Radnor,  ....  1684 
Duke  of  Grafton,  ....  1685 
Marquis  of  Rockingham,  -        .  1686 

Lord  Camden,  ....  1686 

Question  taken ;  Bill  committed  to  a  Conamittee 
of  the  Whole  House,  ....  1687 

20,  Bill  reported,  amended,  and  ordered  for  a  third 

reading  to-morrow,      -         -         -         .         -1687 

21,  Bill  read  a  third  time, 1688 

Amendment  offered  by  the  Earl  of  Buckingham- 
shire,          1688 

Debate — Duke  of  Manchester,  ...  1688 
Lord  Chancellor,  ....  1688 
Duke  of  Manchester,  ...  1688 

Earl  of  Effingham,  -        .        .  1689 

Earl  of  Dartmouth,  -         .         .  1689 

Amendment  rejected,       .....  1689 

Bill  passed, 1689 

List  of  the  Minority, 1689 

Protest, 1689 

"  An  Act  to  Restrain  the  Trade  and  Commerce  of 
the  Provinces  of  Massachusetts  Bay  and  New- 
Hampshire,  and  Colom'es  of  Connecticut  and 
Rhode-Island,  and  Providence  Plantation,  in 
North  America,  to  Great  Britain,  Ireland,  and 
the  British  Islands  in  the  West  Indies;  and 
to  prohibit  such  Provinces  and  Colonies  from 
carrying  on  any  Fishery  on  the  Banks  of  New- 
foundland, or  other  places  therein  mentioned, 
under  certain  conditions  and  limitations,"        -  1691 


ON  THE  BILL  TO 


RESTRAIN  THE  TRADE  OF 
COLONIES. 


THE   SOUTHERN 


House  of  Commons. 
Mar.  3,  American  Papers  presented  by  Lord  North,      -  1697 
Letter  from  Governour  Franklin  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,  dated  February  1,      -        -        .  1697 


cxt 

1775.  i_      -r*       1     f  T^k- 

Mar.d,  Letter  from  Govemour  Ponn  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, datedJanuary  30,  ■  "  "  T 
Petition  of  iho  Merchants,  Linen  Drapers,  and 
principal  Inhabitants,  of  the  City  of  Waterford, 
in  the  Kingdom  of  Ireland,  presented, 
8,  Letter  from  Govemour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, dated  January  27,  presented  by  Lord 

North, ■ 

Mr.  Hartley's  motion  for  an  Address  to  the  King, 
requesting  him  to  direct  a  copy  of  a  Letter 
from  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth  to  Lieutenant  Gov- 
emour Golden,  dated  December  lOth,  may  be 
laid  before  the  House,  .        .        .        - 

Debate — Mr.  Hartley,  .         .         -         - 

Mr.  Rigby, 

Mr.  T.  Townshend, 

Lord  North, 

Mr.  Fox, 

Mr.  Hartley's  motion  rejected,  .        .        - 

House  in  Committee  on  the  American  Papers, 


CONTENTS. 


CXII 


13, 
15. 


16, 
17. 


20, 


23. 

27, 
29. 
30, 


1698 


1698 


1698 


1699 
1699 
1699 
1699 
1699 
1699 
1699 
1700 
1700 


9,      Accounts  of  Exports  and  Imports  presented, 

Petition  of  Gentlemen,  Merchants,  and  Traders, 

in  the  Woollen  Manufactory  at  or  near  Hud- 

dersfield,  in  the  West  Riding  of  the  County  of 

York,  presented,         -         -         -         *,    ," 

Petition  of  the  Manufacturing  Hosiers  of  the 

Town  and  County  of  Nottingham,  presented,  1700 
Permission  granted  to  the  Petitioners  to  be  heard 

before  the  Committee  if  they  think  fit, 

House  in  Committee  on  the  American  Papers,     - 

Motion  by  Lord  North,  for  leave  to  bring  in  a 

Bill  to  Restrain  the  Trade  of   New-Jersey, 

Pennsylvania,  Maryland,  Virginia,  and  South 

Carolina,  ..---- 

Debate — Lord  John  Cavendish,        .        .        • 

Sir  William  Mayne,  .        .        - 

Mr.  Hartley,  .... 

Lord  North, 

Question  taken ;  motion  agreed  to  by  the  Com- 
mittee,      ------- 

Reported  to  the  House,  -        -        -        - 

Leave  granted,  and  Committee  appointed  to  bring 

in  the  Bill, - 

Bill  presented  by  Mr.  Cooper,  and  read  first  time,  1702 

Second  reading  ordered  for  Thursday,       -        -  1702 

Accounts  of  Duties,  Di'awbacks,  and  Imposts, 

presented,  ------ 

Petition  of  the  Clothiers  and  other  principal  In- 
habitants of  Trowbridge,  in  the  County  of 
Wilts,  presented,         -        -        -        -        - 

Second  reading  of  the  Bill  postponed  until  to- 
morrow, -        -        -        - 

Bill  read  second  time,  and  committed  to  a  Com- 
mittee of  the  Whole  House,  -        -        - 
House  in  Committee  go  through  with  the  Bill, 
Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Whole  to  be  re- 
ceived on  the  23d,       ----- 

Report  postponed  to  the  27th,  ... 

Report  further  postponed  to  the  29th, 
Report  to  be  received  to-morrow,      -         -         - 
Bill  reported  from  the  Committee  of  the  AVhole, 
Debate — Mr.  John  Luttrell,    -        -        -        - 

Mr.  Temple  Luttrell,        .        .        - 

Lord  North, 

Amendment,  relating  to  Delaware,  proposed  by 

Lord  North,  and  agreed  to,  -         -         - 

Bill  ordered  to  be  read  a  third  time  on  the  3d  of 

April, 

Papers  presented  by  Lord  North,     -         -         - 
Letter  from  Govemour  Gage  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, dated  February  17,  -         -         - 
Letter  from   Govemour   Gage  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,  dated  February  20, 
Apr.  3,  Third  reading  of  the  Bill  postponed, 

Estimate  of  the  charge  of  maintaining  and  sup- 
porting the  Civil  Establishment  of  his  Majes- 
ty's Colony  of  Nova-Scotia,  for  the  year  1775, 
Estimate  of  the  Civil  Establishment  of  his  Ma- 
jesty's Colony  of  Georgia,  and  the  Incidental 
Expenses  attending  the  same,  from  the  24th  of 
June,  1774,  to  the  24th  of  June,  1775, 
Estimate  of  the  Civil  Establishment  of  East 
Florida,  and  other  Incidental  Expenses  attend- 
ing the  same,  from  June  24,  1774.  to  June  24. 

1775. 

Estimate  of  the  Expenses  attending  General  Sur- 
veys of  his  Majesty's  Dominions  in  North 
America,  for  the  year  1775,         ...  1712 


-  1700 


1701 
1701 


1701 
1701 
1701 
1702 
1702 

1702 
1702 


-  1702 


1702 


1703 

1703 

1704 
1704 


1704 
1704 
1704 
1704 
1704 
1705 
1706 
1708 


-  1708 


1708 
1708 

1708 

1709 
1709 


1710 


1710 


1711 


1775.  ,      ,    . 

Apr.  5.  Bill  read  the  third  time, 

Motion  made  that  the  Bill  do  Pass,  - 
Debate — Mr.  Hartley, 
Lord  North, 
Sir  William  Mayne, 
Mr.  Rigby, 
Marquis  of  Granby, 
Lord  North,    - 
Mr.  Alderman  Sawbridge, 
Mr.  Alderman  Bull. 
Sir  John  Duntze. 
General  Conway.     - 
Mr.  Rigby,      ... 
Mr.  T.  Townshend, 
Question  taken ;  the  Bill  passed. 
House  of  Lords. 
Apr.  6,  Bill  to  Restrain  the  Trade  of  New- Jersey,  Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland,  Virginia,  and  South  Ca- 
rolina, received  from  the  Commons, 

Read  the  first  time, 

7,     Bill  read  the  second  time,         -         -         -         - 
10,     House  in  Committee,  go  through  with  the  Bill, 

Third  reading  ordered  for  the  12th, 
12,     Bill  read  the  third  time  and  passed. 

Lords  dissenting, 

"  An  Act  to  Restrain  the  Trade  and  Commerce 
of  the  Colonies  of  New-Jersey,  Pennsylvania, 
Maryland,  Virginia,  and  South  Carolina,  to 
Great  Britain,  Ireland,  and  the  British  Islands 
in  the  West  Indies,  under  certain  conditions 
and  limitations,"         .  .         .         .         - 


1712 
1712 
1712 
1712 
1712 
1713 
1713 
1714 
1714 
1714 
1715 
1715 
1715 
1715 
1716 


1716 
1716 
1716 
1716 
1716 
1716 
1716 


1716 


ON  THE  PETITION  OF  THE  WEST  INDIA  PLANTERS 

House  of  Commons. 
MaT.8,  House  to  go  into  Committee  on  the  Petitions,  on 
the  15th, - 

15,  Witnesses  directed  to  attend  the  Committee  of  the 

Whole,  

House  in  Committee  on  the  Petitions, 

16,  House  in  Committee,       .         .         .         -         - 
Mr.  Glover  appeared  as  Agent  of  the  West  In- 
dia Planters,  and  Manager  of  the  Evidence  in 
support  of  their  Petition,  which  was  presented 
on  the  2d  of  February,         .         .         -         - 

Mr.  Glover's  Address  to  the  Committee, 
George  Walker  examined,       -         -         -         - 
John  Ellis  examined,      -         -         .         .         - 
Evidence  summed  up  by  Mr.  Glover, 
Petition  and  Memorial  of  the  Assembly  of  Ja- 
maica, to  the  King  in  Coimcil,  dated  Decem- 
ber 28,  1774,  presented  by  Lord  North, 
20,     House  again  in  Committee  on  the  Petitions, 

Witnesses  examined  on  the  Petitions  from  Not- 


1721 

1721 
1721 
1721 


1721 

1721 
1722 
1731 
1733 


1743 
1743 


27, 


tingham,  ---..-  1743 

Debate  on  the  objection  made  by  Mr.  Van,  to  a 

question  put  to  one  of  the  witnesses,  by  Mr. 

Burke, 

Remarks  of  Mr.  Bailey  on  the  conduct  of  Lord 

North,  in  relation  to  the  Petitioners, 
Petitions  to  be  further  considered  on  the  27th,     - 
Consideration  postponed  for  one  week,  when  the 

subject  dropped,  -         .         .         .         . 


1743 

1744 
1744 

1745 


ON  MR.  BURKe's  RESOLUTIONS  FOR  CONCILIATION. 

House  of  Commons. 
March  Mr.  Burke's  Resolutions  for  Conciliatioij  with 

22,          America,            ...---  1745 

Debate— Mr.  Burke, 1745 

Mr.  Jenkinson,          ....  1776 

Lord  Frederick  Campbell,          -         -  1777 

Question  taken,  and  the  Resolutions  rejected,  1778 

ON  MR.  hartley's  PROPOSITIONS  FOR  CONCILIATION. 

House  of  Commons. 
March  Mr,  Hartley's  Propositions  for  Conciliation  with 

27.        the  Colonies, 1781 

Debate— Mr.  Hartley,            -        -        -        -  1781 

Sir  Cecil  Wray,       -        -        -        -  1791 

Lord  North, 1791 

Sir  Cecil  Wray,        -         -         -         -  1792 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,           -         -         -  1792 

Lord  William  Campbell,            -         -  1792 

Mr.  Lyttelton,           ....  1792 

Sir  George  Savile,             ...  1792 

Mr.  Vyner, 1792 

Mr.  Tuffiiell,            ....  1792 

Mr.  Hartley's  Propositions  rejected,          -        -  1793 


CXIII 


CONTENTS. 


CXIV 


1775. 


ON  THE  AMERICAN  MUTINY  BILL. 


House  of  Commons. 

March  Leave  granted  to  bring  in  a  Bill  to  render  more 
24,         effectual  in  his  Majesty's  Dominions  in  Ame- 
rica, the  Act  for  punishing  Mutiny  and  Deser- 
tion, ....... 

27,  The  Bill  presented  by  Lord  Barrington, 

28,  Bill  read  the  second  time,         .         -         .         . 

30,  Considered  in  Committee  of  the  Whole, 

31,  Ordered  to  be  engrossed,  .         .         .         . 
Apr.  5,  Read  the  third  time  and  passed,         ... 

House  of  Lords. 
Apr.G,  Bill  to  render  more  effectual  in  his  Majesty's  Do- 
minions in  America,  the  Act  for  the  punishment 
of  Mutiny  and  Desertion,  received  from  the 
Commons,  ...... 

7,     Bill  read  the  second  time,         -         .         .         . 

10,  House  in  Committee  on  the  Bill,     -         .         . 

11,  Read  the  third  time  and  passed,         .         .         . 
"An  Act  to  amend,  and  render  more  effectual  in 

his  Majesty's  Dominions  in  America,  an  Act, 
passed  in  the  present  Session  of  Parliament, 
entitled,  '  An  Act  for  punishing  Mutiny  and 
Desertion,  and  for  the  better  Payment  of  the 
Army  and  their  Quarters,'  and  for  extending 
the  provisions  of  the  said  Act  to  his  Majesty's 
Marine  Forces  in  America," 


1793 
1793 
1793 
1793 
1794 
1794 


1794 
1794 
1794 
1795 


.  1795 


ON  THE  BRITISH  FISHERY  BILL. 


House  of  Commons. 

April    Motion  of  Lord  North  to  consider  of  the  Enconr- 
1 1,        agement  proper  to  be  given  to  the  Fisheries  of 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland,    ....  1805 

Debate— Lord  North, 1805 

Mr.  Burke, 1806 

Mr.  Thomas  To\vnshend,  -         -  1806 

Mr.  Connolly,  -         -         -         -  1807 

Mr.  Burke, 1807 

Lord  North, 1807 

Motion  agreed  to, 1807 

27,  House  in  Committee  on  Lord  North's  motion,     .  1807 
Lord  North's  Explanations,     ....  1807 

28,  Resolutions  reported  by  Committee  of  the  Whole, 

for  the  Encouragement  of  the  Fisheries  carried 
on  from  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  agreed  to,    1809 
Committee  to  prepare  the  Bill,  -         -         -   1811 

JWay4,  Bill  presented  by  Mr.  Jenkinson,     -         .         .  1811 
9,     Read  the  second  time,  .         -         .         .1811 

11,     Considered  in  Committee,        -         .         .         -1811 
17,     Read  the  third  time  and  passed,        .         -         -   1812 
House  of  Lords. 
3fayl8,Bill  for  the  Encouragement  of  British  Fisheries 

received  from  the  Commons,  -  .  .1812 
19,  Read  the  second  time,  .  -  -  .  .1812 
22,     Considered  in  Committee,  and  read  the  third  time 

and  passed,         .         .         .         -         .         .1812 

ON  PROVIDING  WAYS  AND  MEANS  FOR   1775. 

House  of  Commons. 
May  3,  House  in  Committee  to  consider  further  of  the 
Ways  and  Means  for  raising  the  Supply  grant- 
ed to  his  Majesty,       .         -         .         .         .   1811 
Resolutions  offered  by  Lord  North,  -         .1815 

Debate — Lord  North, 1813 

Mr.  Hartley,  ....  1815 

Mr.  Vyner, 1815 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,  -         .         .1815 

Lord  North, 1815 

Governour  Johnstone,        .         -         -  1816 
4,      Resolutions  reported  from  the  Committee  of  the 

Whole, 1816 

Agreed  to  by  the  House,  -         -         -         -  1818 


ON  THE  REMONSTRANCE  OF  THE  NEW.YORK  ASSEMBLY. 

House  of  Commons. 

May\5,  Representation  and  Remonstrance  of  the  Assem. 

bly  of  New- York,  offered  by  Mr.  Burke,      -  1819 

Mr.  Burke's  motion,  that  the  Representation  and 
Remonstrance  be  brought  up,        -         .         .  1819 

Motion  by  Lord  North  to  amend  by  inserting,  in 
Mr.  Burke's  motion,  after  the  word  Remon- 
strance, the  words  "  in  which  the  said  Assem- 

FouRTH  Series. 


1775. 


bly  claim  to  themselves  rights  derogatory  to, 
and  inconsistent  with,  the  Legislative  authority 

of  Parliament," 1819 

Debate— Mr.  Burke, 1€19 

Lord  North,    -        ....        -  1819 

Mr.  Cruger, 1820 

Mr.  Cornwall,           ....  1821 
Mr.  Jcnkinson,          .         .         .         .1821 

Mr,  Aubrey, 1821 

Mr.  Fox, 1822 

Governour  Johnstone,        ...  1822 

Lord  North's  motion  to  amend  agreed  to,           -  1822 

Mr.  Burke's  motion,  as  amended,  rejected,          -  1822 


ON  THE  PETITIONS  FROM  QCEBECK. 

House  of  Lords. 

itfay  17, Petition  of  his  Majesty's  loyal  and  dutiful  Sub- 
jects, settled  in  the  Province  of  duebeck,  pre- 
sented by  Lord  Camden,     -         -         .         .  1823 

Debate — Earl  Gower,             ....  1823 

Lord  Camden,           ....  1823 

Bill  offered  by  Lord  Camden,  to   Repeal  the 

Q,uebeck  Act, 1826 

Motion  by  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  that  the  Bill 

be  now  rejected, 1826 

Debate— Earl  of  Dartmouth,  .        -        .1826 

Duke  of  Richmond,  .         .         .1827 

Lord  Lyttelton,         -         -         -         -  1827 

Duke  of  Manchester,        -        -        -  1829 

Earl  of  Rochford,     ....  1829 

Earl  of  Bristol,         -         -         -         -  1829 

Lord  Lyttelton,          -         -         -         -  1830 

Earl  of  Sandwich,             -         -         -  1831 

Earl  of  Bristol,         -         .         .         .  1831 

Earl  of  Sandwich,             -         -         -  1831 

Archbishop  of  Canterbury,        -        -  1831 

Earl  of  Shelburne,             -         -         -  1831 

Lord  Mansfield,        -         .         .         -  1834 

Lord  Camden,           -         -         .         -  1834 

Question  taken,  and  the  Bill  rejected,        -        -  1834 

List  of  the  Minority, 1834 

House  of  Communis. 

MaylS,  Petition  and  Memorial  of  his  Majesty's  ancient 

Subjects,  Seigneurs,  Freeholders,  Merchants, 

Traders,  and  others,  settled  in  his  Majesty's 

Province  of  Quebeck,  presented,           -         -  1833 

Sir  George  Savile's  motion  for  leave  to  bring  in 

a  Bill  to  repeal  the  Quebeck  Act,          -         -  1836 

Debate — Sir  George  Savile,              ...  1835 

Mr.  T.  Townshend,           -        .        -  1836 

Mr.  De  Grey,           ....  1836 

Mr.  Howard,            -        .        .        -  1836 

Lord  North, 1836 

Mr.  Fox, 1837 

Sir  Robert  Smythe,  .        -        -        .1837 

Colonel  Barr^,          ....  1838 

Sir  W.  Meredith,     ....  1838 

Colonel  Barre,          ....  1838 
Question  taken,  and  Sir  George  Savile's  motion 

rejected, 1838 

ON  THE  MEMORIAL  OF  THE  NEW.YORK  ASSEMBLY. 

House  of  Lords. 

MaylS,  Memorial  of  his  Majesty's  faithful  Subjects  and 
Representatives  of  the  Colony  of  New- York, 
in  General  Assembly  convened,  presented,     -  1837 
Motion  by  the  Duke  of  Manchester,  that  the 

Memorial  might  be  read  by  the  Clerk,  -  1837 

Debate — Earl  of  Dartmouth,  -         -         -  1837 

Duke  of  Manchester,        -        -        -  1838 

Earl  of  Buckinghamshire  -        -  1838 

Earl  of  Denbigh,     -        -        -        -  1839 

Earl  Gower,  ....  1839 

Duke  of  Manchester,         -         -        -  1839 

Earl  of  Hillsborough,       -         -         -  1839 

Duke  of  Richmond,  ...  1839 

Earl  of  Sandwich,  ...  1839 

Motion  by  the  Earl  of  Sandwich,  to  amend  the 

Duke  of  Manchester's  motion,  by  inserting 

after  the  word  Memorial,  the  words,  "  the  con. 

tents  thereof,  not  having  been  opened,"  -  1839 

Debate — Duke  of  Richmond,  .        -        -  1839 

Earl  Gower,  -        -         -        -  1839 

Lord  Camden,  ....  1839 

Earl  of  Effingham,  -        -        -  1840 


CXY 


1775. 


Amendment  proposed  by  the  Earl  of  Sandwich, 
rejected,  ......  1842 

Question  taken  on  the  Duke  of  Manchester's 
motion,  and  the  House  refused  to  permit  the 
Memorial  to  be  read,  ....  1842 

3fay26,  Speaker's  Speech  to  the  Xing',        -         -         -  1841 
King's  Speech  to  both  Houses,         ...  1842 
Parliament  prorogued  to  the  27th  day  of  July 
ne.Tt,         - 1844 


1774. 


PETITIONS  TO  THE  KING. 


Jan.  10,  The  most  humble  Petition  of  his  Majesty's  an^ 
cicnt  and  loyal  Subjects,  Freeholders,  Mer 
chants,  and  Planters,  in  the  Province  of  Que 
beck,  in  North  America  to  the  King,     - 
15,      Memorial  of  the  Freeholders,  Merchants,  Plan- 
ters, and  others,  his  Majt'stj^'s  ancient  and 
loyal  Subjects,  now  in  the  Province  of  Quc- 
beck,  to  the  Right  Honourable  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,  one  of  his  Majesty's  principal  Se- 
cretaries of  State,        -         -         -         -        - 

March  Letter  from  Francis  Maseres  to  the  Committee 
19,  of  the  Petitioners  for  an   Assembly  in   the 

Province  of  Qucbeck.  Has  presented  the 
Petition  and  Memorial.  Ministers  believe  the 
Province  is  not  yet  ripe  for  an  Assembly,  and 
prefer  for  the  present  a  Legislative  Council, 
nominated  by  the  King.  Advises  them  to 
declare  that  the  British  Parliament  has  su- 
preme authority  over  the  Province,  both  of 


-  1843 


1844 


1774. 


Feb. 


CONTENTS.  cxvi 

Legislation  and  Taxation,  and  that  such  au- 
thority shall  continue  after  the  Establishment 
of  an  Assembly,         -         -         -         -         -  1845 

Petition  of  divers  Roman  Catholick  Inhabitants 
of  the  Province  of  Qucbeck,  signed  and  trans- 
mitted to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  his  Majes- 
ty's Secretary  of  State  for  America,       -         -  1846 

Memorial  in  support  of  the  requests  made  by  his 
Majesty's  most  obedient  and  most  faithful  new 
Subjects  in  Canada, 1843 

Petition  of  his  Majesty's  most  loyal  and  dutiful, 
his  ancient  Subjects,  settled  in  the  Province  of 
Qucbeck, 1849 

Humble  Address  and  Petition  of  the  Merchants, 
Traders,  and  others,  of  the  City  of  London, 
concerned  in  the  Commerce  of  North  America,  1850 

Address  and  Petition  of  the  People  called  Qua- 
kers, to  George  the  Third,  King  of  C4reat 
Britain,  and  the  Dominions  thereunto  belong- 
ing, -         -         -         -         -         -         -  1852 

Humble  Address,  Remonstrance,  and  Petition  of 
the  Lord  Mayor,  Aldermen,  and  Livery,  of  the 
City  oi  London,  in  Common-Hall,  assembled,  1853 

The  King's  Answer,  delivered  to  the  Lord 
Mayor,  by  the  Earl  of  Hertford,  Lord  Cham- 
berlain,     -         -  .      -         -         -         «         -  1854 

Letter  from  the  Lord  Chamberlain,  to  the  Lord 

Mayor  of  London, 1854 

May  2,  Mr.  Wilkes's,  the  Lord  Mayor's  Answer,  to  the 
Letter  from  Lord  Hertford,  the  Lord  Cham- 
berlain,             ■        .  1854 


Nov. 
12, 

1775. 
March 
23, 


April 
10, 


11, 


List  of  the  Delegates  appointed  by  the  several  Counties  of  the  Province  of  jMaryland,   to  the  Convention  which 
met  at  Annapolis,  by  Adjournment,   on   the    Eighth  day  of  Dece.hber,   1774,  and  continued 
till  the  Twelfth  day  of  the  same  month.     (See  page  1031.) 


For  St.  Mary's  County. — John  Allen  Thomas,  Jeremiah 
Jordan,  Richard  Barnes,  John  De  Butts. 

For  Charles  County. — John  Dent,  Daniel  Jenifer,  Thomas 
Stone. 

.For  Calvert  County. — John  Weeras,  Alexander  Sonier- 
ville,  Richard  Parran,  Edward  Reynolds,  Benjamin 
Mackall_,  4th. 

For  Frince  George's  County. — William  Bowie,  Robert 
Tyler,  Edward  Sprigg,  John  Rodgers,  David  Crauford, 
Joshua  Beall,  Osborn  Sprigg,  Walter  Bowie. 

For  Frederick  County. — Charles  Beatty,  Jacob  Funk, 
Henry  Griffith,  Thomas  Price,  Richard  Brooke,  Jo- 
seph Chapline,  Upton  Sheredine,  Thomas  Sprigg  Woot- 
len. 

For  Anne  Arundel  County,  and  City  of  Annapolis. — John 
Hall,  Thomas  Johnson,  Samuel  Chase,  William  Paca, 
Matthias  Hammond,  Charles  Carroll,  Barrister,  Charles 
Carroll  of  Carrolllon,  Brice  T.  B.  Worthington,  Tho- 
mas Dorsey,  John  Weems. 

For  Baltimore  County. — John  Moale,  Thomas  Cockey 


Deye,  Walter  Tiiliey,  Benjamin    Nicholson,    William 

Buchanan,  John  Boyd,  Samuel  Worthington,  Charles 

Ridgely. 
For  Harford  County. — Thomas  Bond,  John  Love,  Josias 

Carvile  Hall,  John  Paca,  Aquila  Paca,  Francis  Holland, 

Aquila  Hall,  Amos  Garret,  Richard  Dallam. 
For  Cecil  County. — John  Veazy,  Joseph  Gilpin. 
For  Kent  County. — Thomas  Ringgold,  Joseph  Earle. 
For  (^ueeji  Anne  County. — James  Hollyday,  John  Brown, 

Thomas  Wright,  Turburt  Wright. 
For  Caroline  County. — Hemy  Dickenson,  Benedict  Brice, 

William  Mellefon,  Joshua  Clarke. 
For  Dorchester  County. — John  Dickenson,  Thomas  En- 

nalls,  Matthew  Brown,  Josiali  Richardson,  Zachariah 

Campbell. 
For  Somerset  County. — Peter  Waters,  George  Dashiell, 

Samuel  Wilson,  Josiah  Polk,  Henry  Waggaman,  John 

Winder,  Luther  Martin. 
For  fVorccster  County. — Peter  Chaille,  William  Purnel], 

Samuel  Handy,  Smith  Bishop,  Nehemiah  Holland. 


DOCUMENTARY  HISTORY,  &c. 


PROCEEDINGS,  PAPERS,  AXD  DEBATES  OF  THE  HOUSE  OF  LORDS  AND  HOUSE  OF  COMMONS,  ON  MEASURES 

RELATING  TO  THE  AMERICAN  COLONIES,  DURING  THE  SEVENTH  SESSION  OF  THE 

THIRTEENTH  PARLIAMENT  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN. 


I.     THE  KING'S  MESSAGE,  OF  SEVENTH  MARCH,  1774. 


HOUSE  OF  LORDS. 
Friday,  March  4th,  1774. 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth  acquainted  the  House  "  That 
"  his  Majesty  had  given  directions,  that  the  several  Papers 
"  received  from  America,  relating  to  the  Disturbances  there, 
"  with  regard  to  the  importation  of  Tea,  should  be  laid 
"  before  the  House ;  and  that  the  same  will  be  delivered 
"  on  Monday  next." 

Monday,  March  1th,  1774. 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth  acquainted  the  House,  "  That 
"  he  had  a  Message  from  his  Majesty,  under  his  Royal  sign 
*'  manual,  which  his  Majesty  had  commanded  him  to  deli- 
*'  ver  to  this  House." 

And  the  same  was  read  by  the  Lord  Chancellor,  and  is 
as  follows ;  (videlicet,) 

George  R. 

His  Majesty  upon  information  of  the  unwarrantable 
practices  which  have  been  lately  concerted  and  earned  on 
in  North  America,  and,  particularly,  of  the  violent  and 
outrageous  proceedings  at  the  Town  and  Port  of  Boston, 
in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  with  a  view  to  ob- 
structing the  Commerce  of  this  Kingdom,  and  upon  grounds 
and  pretences  immediately  subversive  of  the  Constitution 
thereof,  hath  thought  fit  to  lay  the  whole  matter  before  his 
two  Houses  of  Parliament,  fully  confiding,  as  well  in  their 
zeal  for  the  maintenance  of  his  Majesty's  authority,  as  in 
their  attachment  to  the  common  interest  and  welfare  of  all 
bis  Dominions,  that  they  will  not  only  enable  his  Majesty 
effectually  to  take  such  measures  as  may  be  most  likely  to 
put  an  immediate  stop  to  the  present  disorders,  but  will  also 
take  into  their  most  serious  consideration,  what  farther  regu- 
lations and  permanent  provisions  may  be  necessary  to  be 
established  for  better  securing  the  execution  of  the  Laws, 
and  the  just  dependence  of  the  Colonies  upon  the  Crown 
and  Parliament  of  Great  Britain.  G.  R. 

The  said  Message  was  then  read  again  by  the  Clerk. 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  (by  his  Majesty's  command,) 
laid  before  the  House  copies  of  all  Letters,  &;c.,  received 
from  America,  relating  to  the  Disturbances  there  w  ith  regard 
to  the  importation  of  Tea,  together  with  a  list  thereof; 
which  was  read  by  the  Clerk,  as  follows; 

Massachusetts  Bay. 

No.  1.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  4th  November, 
1773,  received  17lh  December,  enclosing. 

No.   2.  Copy  of  a   Letter  to  Thomas  and   Elisha 
Hutchinson,  delivered  at  their  house   in   Boston, 
2d  hovember,  1773. 
No.  3.  Copy  of  a  printed  Paper,  posted  up  in  the 

Town  of  Boston,  on  the  3d  November,  1773. 
No.  4.  Copy  of  a  Narrative. 
No.  5.  Copy  of  a  Narrative. 
No.  6.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Milton,  near  Boston,  6th 
November,  1773;  received  '25th  December,  enclosing. 


No.  7.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Mr.  Richard  Clarke 
and  Company,  and  Benjamin  Faneuil  and  Compa- 
ny, to  John  Hancock,  Esquire,  dated  4th  Novem- 
ber, 1773. 
No.  8.  Copy  of  a  Vote  of  the  Town  Meeting  at 

Boston,  the  5th  November,  1773. 
No.  9.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Thomas  Hutchinson, 
Junior,  to  John  Hancock,  Esquire ;  (no  date.) 
No.  10.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Govemovix Hutchinson 
•to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth ,  dated  Boston,  15th  November, 
1773  ;  received  3d  January,  1774. 

No.  1 1 .  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  2d  of  December, 
1773  ;  received  27th  January,  1774,  enclosing. 

No.  12.  Copy  of  a  Petition  of  Richard  Clarke  and 
Sons,  Benjamin  Fancuil,  and  Thomas  and  Elisha 
Hutchinson ;  and  of  the  Proceedings  of  the  Coun- 
cil thereupon. 
No.  13.  Extract  from  the  Massachusetts  Gazette,  of 

the  26th  November,  1773. 
No.  14.  Copy  of  a  Paper  printed  at  Boston,  dated 
1st  December,  1773. 
No.  15.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  15th  December, 
1773;  received  2d  February,  1774. 

No.  16.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  17th  December, 
1773 ;  received  27th  January,  1774. 

No.  17.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  20th  December, 
1773;  received  14th  February,  1774. 

No.  18.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Govemom  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  24th  December, 
1773  ;  received  14th  February,  1774,  enclosing. 

No.   19.  Extract  of  the  Minutes  of  the  Council  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  on  the  21st  December,  1773. 
No.  20.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Hutcfnnson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  4th  January, 
1774 ;  received  13th  February. 

New-  York. 

No.  21.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Major  General  Haldi- 
mand  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  3d  of 
November,  1773 ;  received  10th  December. 

No.  22.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Major  General  Haldi- 
mand  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  2Sth 
December,  1773  ;  received  4tli  February,  1774. 

No.  23.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Major  General  Haldi- 
mand  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  5th 
January,  1774  ;  received  5th  February. 

No.  24.  Copy  of  a  Paper  referred  to  in  Major  General 
Haldimand's  Letter  of  the  5th  January,  1774. 

No.  25.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Major  General  Haldi- 
mand  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  2d  February,  1774  ; 
received  2d  March. 

No.  26.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Govemour  Tryon  to  the 
Earl  oi Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  3d  November,  1773; 
received  10th  December,  enclosing. 

No.  27.  Copy  of  a  printed  Paper,  intituled,  "  The 
Alarm,No.l,"  dated  New-  York,  6thOctober,llT3. 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


8 


The 


Copy  of  a  printed  Paper,  intituled,  "  Thi 
n,  So.  2,"  dated  New-York,  9th  o(  October 


No.  28. 
Alarm, 
1773. 
No.  29.  Extract  from  a  printed  Paper,  intituled, "  Tne 
Alarm,"  dated  New  York,  19th  October,  1773. 
No.  30.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Tryon  to  the 
Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Netv-  York,  1st  December,  1773 ; 
received  10th  Jarniary,  1774,  enclosing. 

No.  31.  Memorial  of  the  Agents  of  the  East  India 
Company,  praying  that  the  Tea  shipped  by  the 
Company,  may,  on  its  arrival,  be  taken  under  the 
protection  of  Government. 
No.  32.  Minutes  of  Council  relative  to  the  Tea  ship- 
ped by  the  East  India  Company. 
No.  33.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Tryon  to  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  3d  January,  1774; 
received  otli  February,  1774. 

No.  34.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Tryon  to  the 
Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  New-York,  5th  January,  1774 ; 
received  5th  February,  enclosing, 

No.  35.  Extract  from  the  Minutes  of  the  Council  of 
New-York. 

South  Carolina. 

No.  36.  Extract  of  ;t  Letter  from  Lieutenant  Governour 
Bull  to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  24th  December,  1773 ; 
received  28th  January,  1774. 

Neio-Hampshire. 

No.  37.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  GovemoysiWcntworth, 
to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated   New-Hampshire,  17th 
December,  1773;  received  2d  March,  1774,  enclosing. 
No.  38.  Notification  of  the  Selectmen  of  the  Town 

of  Portsmouth. 
No.  39.  Resolves  of  Portsmouth,  in  New-Hampshire, 
respecting  the  Teas. 

Admiralty. 

No.  40.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Lords  Commissioners 
of  the  Admiralty  to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  the  20th 
January,  1774;  received  the  21st,  enclosing. 

No.  41.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Rear  Admiral  Mon- 
tagu to  Philip  Stephens,  Esqr.,  Secretary  of  the 
Admiralty,  dated  Boston,  8th  December,  1773. 
No.  42.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Lords  Commissioners 
of  the  Admiralty  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  27th 
January,  1774  ;  received  the  same  day,  enclosing. 

No.  43.  A  copy  of  a  Letter  from  Rear  Admiral 
Montagu  to  Philip  Stephens,  Esqr.,  Secretary  of 
the  Admiralty,  dated  Boston,  17th  December,  1773. 

War  Office. 

No.  44.  Copy  of  a  I^etter  from  Lord  Viscount  Barrington 
to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  War  OfEce,  28th  January, 
1774  ;  received  29tli,  enclosing. 

No.  45.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Honourable  Alex- 
ander Leslie,  Lieutenant  Colonel  of  the   Sixty- 
Fourth  Regiment  of  Foot,  to  Lord  Viscount  Bar- 
rington, dated  Castle  William,  December  6,  1773. 
No.  46.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Ditto  to  Ditto,  dated 
17th  December,  1773. 

£aj<  India  Company. 

No.  47.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  20th  De- 
cember, 1773  ;  received  21st,  enclosing, 

No.  48.  Account  of  Tea  exported  by  the  East  India 
Company  to  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in  North  Ame- 
rica, with  the  quantities,  and  to  whom  consigned. 
No.  49.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  23d  De- 
cember, 1773  ;  received  25th,  enclosing. 

No.  50.  Extract  of  a  Letter  dated  Boston,  18th  Oc- 
tober, 1773. 
No.  51.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  New- York,  dated 

5th  November,  1773. 
No.  52.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  New-  York,  dated 

5lh  November,  1773. 
No.  53.  Cony  of  a  Letter  relative  to  advices  received 
from  Philadelphia  and  New-York,  dated  21st  De- 
cember, 177.3. 


No.  54.  Copy  of  a  Letter  relative  to  advices  received 

from  Philadelphia,  dated  21st  December,  1773. 
No.  55.  Copy  of  a  Letter  relative  to  the  exportation 

of  Tea  to  Boston,  dated  21st  December,  1773. 
No.  56.  Copy  of  a  Letter  relative  to  the  exportation 

of  Tea  to  South  Carolina. 
No.  57.  Copy  of  a  Letter  relative  to  the  exportation 
of  Tea  to  New-York. 
No.  58.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  24th 
December,  1773  ;  received  25tli,  enclosing. 

No.  59.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Philadelphia,  dated 

5th  October,  1773. 
No.  60.  Extract  of  two  Letters  from  Philadelphia, 
dated  October  5th  and  30th,  1773. 
No.  61.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  and  Deputy 
Chairman  of  the  East  India  Company  to  the  Eari  of  Dart- 
mouth,dated  lOih  January,  1774  ;  received  15th,  enclosing, 
No.  62.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  East  India  Com- 
pany's Agents  at  New-York  to  the  Court  of  Di- 
rectors. 
No.  63.  Copy  of  the  Memorial  of  Henry  Wiite  and 
others.  Merchants,  to  the  Governour  of  New-  York. 
No.  64.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  an  Agent  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  his  Correspondents  in  London,  dated 
Boston,  15th  November,  1773. 

No.  65.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  an  Agent  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  his  Correspondent  in  London,  dated 
Boston,  November,  1773. 

No.  66.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  an  Agent  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Chairman,  dated  Boston,  17th  No- 
vember, 1773. 

No.  67.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Eari  of  Dartmouth,  dated  21st 
January,  1774  ;  received  25th,  enclosing, 

No.  68.  Copy  of  a  Letter  signed  "  Anglo  Ameri- 

canus,"  to  the  East  India  Company,  dated  Boston, 

17th  December,  1773. 

No.  69.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  and  Deputy 

Chairman  of  the  East  India  Company  to  the  Earl  of 

Dartmouth,  dated  26th  January,  1774 ;  received  the  same 

day. 

No.  70.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  and  Deputy 
Chairman  of  the  East  India  Company  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, dated  26th  January,  1774 ;  received  27th,  en- 
closing. 

No.  71.  Copy  of  a  Letter  to  the  Delaware  Pilots  and 
•    to  Captain  Ayres,  dated  Philadelphia,  27th  No- 
vember, 1773. 
No.  72.  Declaration  of  Messrs.  James  and  Drinker, 
Agents  for  the  East  India  Company,  at  Phila- 
delphia. 
No.  73.  Postscript  to  the  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  of 

24th  December,  1773. 
No.  74.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Messrs.  James  and 
Drinker  to  the  Directors  of  the  East  India  Com- 
pany, dated  Philadelphia,  28th  December,  1773. 
No.  75.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Messrs.  Tliomas  and 
Isaac    Wharton,   Jonathan   Brown,    and   Gilbert 
Barkley,  to  the  East  India  Company,  dated  Phi- 
ladelphia, 28th  December,  1773. 
No.  76.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  of  the  East 
India  Company  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth ;  received  3d 
February,  1774. 

No.  77.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Thomas  and  Elisha 
Hutchinson,  Richard  Clarke  and  Sons,  and  Benjamin 
Faneuil,  to  the  Directors  of  the  East  India  Company, 
dated  2d  December,  1773. 

No.  78.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Ditto  to  Ditto,  dated 
17th  December,  1773. 

No.  79.  Copies  of  two  Letters  from  Messrs.  Smith, 
Leger,  and  Greenivood,  to  the  Secretary  of  the  East  India 
Company,  dated  4lh  and  18th  December,  1773. 

No.  80.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Chairman  and  Deputy 
Chairman  of  the  East  India  Company  to  the  Earl  of 
Dartmouth,  dated  9th  February,  1774 ;  received  10th, 
enclosing, 

No.  81.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Henry  ff'hite,  Abram 
Lott,  and  Company,  and  Pigou  and  Booth,  to  the 
Directors  of  the  East  India  Company,  dated  Neiv- 
York,  27th  December,  1773. 


9 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


10 


No.  82.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Henry  fVJiitt,  and 
others,  to  Captain  Benjamin  Loclcyer,  of  the  Ship 
Nancy,  dated  New-York,  27th  December,  1773. 
No.  83.  Copy  of  a  Note  from  the  Ciiairman  and  Deputy 
Chairman  of  tiie  East  India  Company  to  the  Earl  of  Dart- 
mouth, dated   15th  February,  1774  ;  received  16th,  en- 
closing. 

No.  84.  Questions  proposed  by  Francis  Rotch,  an 
owner,  and  James  Hall,  master,  of  the  Ship  Dart- 
mouth, with  the  Answers  of  the  Consignees. 
No.  85.  Questions  proposed  by  James  Bruce,  master 
of  the  Ship  Eleanor,  with  the  Answers  of  the  Con- 
signees. 
No.  86.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Mr.  Botch,  owner  of 
the  Ship  Dartmouth,  to  Richard  Clarke  and  Sons, 
&c.,  dated  Boston,  6th  January,  1774. 
No.  87.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Richard  Clarke  and 
Sons,  and  Benjamin  Faneuil,  Jun.,  to  the  Directors 
of  the  East  India  Company,  dated  Castle  William, 
January  7th,  1774. 
No.  88.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Richard  Clarke  and 
Sons,  and  Benjamin  Faneuil,  Jun.,  to  the  East  India 
Company,  dated  January  7th,  1774. 
No.  89.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Mr.  Mitchell,  Secretary 
to  the  East  India  Company,  to  John  Pownall,  Esqr., dated 
16th  February,  1774;  received  17th.  enclosing, 

No.  90.  Copy  of  a  Memorial  of  the  East  India 
Company  to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  16th 
February,  1774. 

Treasury. 

No.  91.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Grey  Cooper,  Esqr., 
Secretary  of  the  Treasury,  to  John  Pownall,  Esqr.,  dated 
7th  March,  1774,  enclosing. 

No.  92.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Mr.  Mather,  acting  as 
Secretary  to  the  Commissioners  of  the  Customs  in 
America,  dated  7th  October,  1773,  to  John  Robin- 
son, Esqr.,  Secretary  to  the  Lords  of  the  Treasury ; 
received  14th  February,  1774. 
No.  93.  A  copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Commissioners  of 
the  Customs  in  America,  to  the  Lords  of  the  Treasury, 
dated  Boston,  4th  January,  1774  ;  received  14th  Februa- 
ry, 1774,  enclosing. 

No.  94.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  the  Collectors  and 
Comptroller  of  the  Customs  at  Boston,  to  the  Com- 
missioners of  the  Customs  there,  dated  17th  De- 
cember, 1773. 
No.  95.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Ditto  to  Ditto,  dated 

23d  December,  1773. 
No.  96.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Ditto  to  Ditto,  dated 

31st  December,  1773. 
No.  97.  Copy  of  a  Protest  of  James  Bruce,  James 

Bruce,  Jun.,  and  John  Finney. 
No.  98.  Do.  of  Hezekiah  Coffin  and  others. 
No.  99.  Do.  of  Francis  Rotch  and  others. 
No.   100.  Depositions  of  Samuel  Hunt  and  others. 
No.  101.  Do.  of  Thomas  Rick  and  others. 
No.  102.  Do.  of  miliam  Elliot  and  others. 
No.  103.  Do.  of  Alexander  Hodgson. 
No.  104.  Do.  of  James  Bruce  and  others. 
No.  105.  Report  of  Arthur  Savage. 
No.  106.  Do.  of  Robert  Parker. 
No.  107.  Memorial  of  Francis  Rotch. 
No.  108.  Do.  of  James  Bruce. 
No.   109.  Do.  of  Hezekiah  Coffin. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Papers  do  lie  on  the  table. 

Ordered,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  '•'  To  return  his  Majesty  the  thanks  of  this  House 
"  for  his  Majesty's  gracious  Message,  and  for  the  communi- 
"  cation  his  Majesty  hath  been  graciously  pleased  to  make 
"  to  this  House,  of  several  Papers  relative  to  the  present 
"  state  of  some  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in  North  Ame- 
"  rica. 

"  To  assure  his  Majesty  that  this  House,  truly  sensible 
"  that  the  peace  and  good  government  of  the  Colonies, 
"  and  the  preventing  any  obstructions  there  to  the  Com- 
"  merce  of  this  Kingdom,  are  objects  of  their  most  serious 
"  attention,  will  enter  upon  the  consideration  of  these 
"  Papers  with  an  earnest  desire  to  make  such  provisions 
"  as,  upon  mature  deliberation,  shall  appear  necessary  and 


"  expedient  for  securing  the  just  dependence  of  the  said 
"  Colonies  upon  the  Crown  and  Parliament  of  Great  Bri- 
"  tain,  and  for  enforcing  a  due  obedience  to  the  Laws  of 
"  this  Kingdom  throughout  all  his  Majesty's  Dominions.'' 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty  by  the  Lords  with  White  Staves. 

Ordered,  That  the  Papers  delivered  this  day  by  the 
Earl  of  Dartmouth,  (by  his  Majesty's  command,)  toge- 
ther with  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message,  be  taken 
into  consideration  on  Thursday,  sevennight ;  and  that  tiie 
Lords  be  summoned. 

Friday,  March  11,  1774. 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  (by  his  Majesty's  command,) 
laid  before  the  House  more  Papers  from  America,  relating 
to  the  Disturbances  there  with  regard  to  the  importation  of 
Tea.  together  with  a  list  thereof, 

Which  was  read  by  the  Clerk,  as  follows : 

No.  1 .  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  28th  January, 
1774;  received  8th  March,  enclosing. 

No.  2.  Extract  from  the  Boston  Gazette,  of  27th 
January,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Papers  do  lie  on  the  table,  and 
that  they  be  taken  into  consideration  on  Thursday  next. 

Wednesday,  March  16,  1774. 

The  House  being  moved,  "  That  the  consideration  of 
"  the  several  Papers  laid  before  tliis  House  (by  his  Majesty's 
"command,)  relating  to  D'lstwhances'm  America,  and  also 
"  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Answer  in  relation  thereto, 
"  be  adjourned  till  to-morrow  sevennight ;  and  that  the 
"  Lords  be  summoned." 

The  same  was  objected  to.  After  short  debate,  the 
question  was  put  thereupon.  It  was  resolved  in  the  Affirm- 
ative. 

Wednesday,  March  23,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  the  consideration  of  the  several  Papers 
laid  before  this  House  (by  his  Majesty's  command,)  rela- 
ting to  the  Disturbances  in  America;  and  also  his  Majesty's 
most  gracious  Message  in  relation  thereto,  which  stands 
appointed  for  to-morrow,  be  adjourned  till  Monday  next ; 
and  that  the  Lords  be  summoned. 

Wednesday,  March  30,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  all  the  Lords  who  have  been  present 
this  day,  be  appointed  a  Committee  to  inquire  into  the 
several  Proceedings  in  the  Colony  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
in  opposition  to  the  sovereignty  of  his  Majesty,  in  his 
Parliament  of  Great  Britain,  over  that  Province  ;  and  also 
what  has  passed  in  this  House  relative  thereto,  from  the  1st 
of  January,  1764. 

Ordered,  That  the  several  Papers  laid  before  this  House 
relating  to  Disturbances  in  the  Colony  of  the  Massachusetts 
Bay,  be  referred  to  the  said  Committee;  and  the  said 
Committee  is  hereby  empowered  to  send  for  Persons, 
Papers,  and  Records. 

Their  Lordships,  or  any  five  of  them,  to  meet  to-morrow, 
in  the  Prince's  lodgings,  near  the  House  of  Peers ;  and  to 
adjourn  as  they  please. 

The  Lords  present,  who  formed  the  Committee,  were  : 

Tlie  Duke  of  Gloucester;  Lord  Apsley,  Lord  High 
Chancellor;  Earl  of  Gower,  Lord  President;  Earl  of 
Hertford,  Lord  Chamberlain. 

Dukes :  Beafort,  Ancaster,  Chandos,  Montagu. 

Earls :  Suffolk,  Denbigh,  Westmoreland,  Stanford, 
Sandwich,  Doncaster,  Rod  ford  ,Abercorn, Loudon,  March, 
Marchmont,  Stair,  Roseberry,  Dartmouth,  Macclesfield, 
Waldegrave,  Asburnham,  Bucks,  Hardwicke,  Faucon- 
berg,  Ilchester,  Northington,  Spencer,  Hillsborough. 

Viscounts :  Montague,  Townshend,  Falmouth. 

Hon :  Frederick  Cornwallis,  Archbishop  of  Canterbu- 
ry; Richard  Tcrrick,  Bishop  of  Lonrfo/i;  Edmund  Keene, 
Bishop  of  Ely;  Sir  William  Asburnham,  Bart.,  Bishop  of 
Chichester;  John  Hume, Bishop  o(  Salisbury  ;  John  Green, 
Bishop  of  Lincoln  ;  Charles  Moss,  Bishop  of  St.  Davids ; 
Eihnund  Law,  Bishop  of  Carlisle;  John  Hinchcliffe, 
Bishop  of  Peterborough ;  William  Markham,  Bishop  of 
Chester. 


11 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


12 


Lords:  Abergavenny,  Wilhughhy,  Br.,  Cathcart,  Ca- 
dogan,  King,  Godolphin,  Moiitfort,  Eds:cumbe,  Sandys, 
Bruce,  IVafpok,  Mansfield,  Lyttchon,  Wycombe,  Scars- 
dale,  Boston,  Pelhavi,  Camden,  Sundridge. 

Thursday,  April  14,  1774. 

The  Earl  of  Btickinghamshirc  reported  from  the  Com- 
mittee appointed  to  inquire  into  tlie  several  Proceedings  in 
the  Colony  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  opposition  to  the 
sovereignty  of  his  Majesty  in  his  Parliament  of  Great  Bri- 
tain, over  that  Province,  and  also  what  has  passed  in  this 
House  relative  thereto,  from  the  1st  of  January,  1764, 
"  That  it  is  the  opinion  of  this  Committee,  that  the  House 
"  be  moved.  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
"  Majesty,  that  he  would  be  graciously  [)leased  to  give 
"  directions  that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  or 
"  extracts  of  all  Letters  and  Papers  which  have  been  receiv- 
"  ed  by  his  Majesty's  Secretaries  of  State,  or  the  Commis- 
"  sioners  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  from  the  Governour, 
"  Lieutenant  Governour,  or  other  Officers  in  his  Majesty's 
"  service  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  iS'ew 
'•■  England,  containing  advices  of  any  proceedings  in  the 
"  said  Province  in  opposition  to  his  Majesty's  sovereignty 
"  in  his  Parliament  of  Great  Britain,  over  the  same,  from 
"  the  7th  of  July,  1766,  which  have  not  been  already  laid 
"  before  the  House." 

Which  Report,  being  read  by  the  Clerk,  was  agreed  to 
by  the  House. 

And  the  Hou'=e  being  moved  accordingly — 

Ordered,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  "  That  he  would  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  di- 
"  rections  that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  or 
"  extracts  of  all  Letters  and  Papers  which  have  been  receiv- 
"  ed  by  his  Majesty's  Secretaries  of  State,  or  the  Com- 
"  missioners  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  from  the  Governour, 
"  Lieutenant  Governour,  or  other  Officers  in  his  ftlajesty's 
"  service  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  Neio 
"  England,  containing  advices  of  any  proceedings  in  the 
"  said  Province  in  opposition  to  his  Majesty's  sovereignty 
"  in  his  Parliament  of  Great  Britain,  over  the  same,  from 
"  the  7th  of  July,  1766,  which  have  not  been  already  laid 
"  before  the  House." 

Friday,  April  15,  1774. 

The  Lord  Chamberlain  reported,  "  That  the  Lords  with 
"  White  Staves  had  (according  to  order)  waited  on  his  Ma- 
"jesty  with  their  Lordships'  Address  of  yesterday ;  and 
"  that  his  Majesty  was  pleased  to  say  '  he  would  give 
"  directions  accordingly.'  " 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  (by  his  Majesty's  command,) 
laid  before  the  House,  the  several  Papers  in  their  Lordships' 
Address  of  yesterday,  relating  to  the  Disturbances  in  Ame- 
rica, together  with  a  list  thereof;  \yhich  was  read  by  the 
Clerk,  as  follows : 

No.  1 .  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Bernard  to 
the  Lords  of  Trade,  dated  Boston,  7th  July,  1766. 

No.  2.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Bernard  to 
the  Earl  of  Shelburnc,  dated  Boston,  7th  February,  1767, 
with  enclosures. 

No.  3.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Bernard  to 
the  Earl  of  Shelburnc,  dated  Boston,  21st  February,  1767. 
No.  4.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Bernard  to 
the  Earl  of  Shelburne,  dated  Boston,  21st  March,  1768. 
No.  5.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Bernard,  to 
the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  30th  of  May, 
1768. 

No.  6.  Answer  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  to  the  Govemour's  Message,  the  30th 
June,  1768. 

No.  7.  Printed  account  of  the  Associations  at  Boston, 
and  the  Proceedings  in  consequence  thereof. 

No.  8.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Sir  Francis  Bernard, 
Baronet,  to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  the 
1st  of  June,  1769. 

No.  9.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  lltli  July, 

1769,  with  an  enclosure. 

No.  10.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  27lh  March, 

1770,  with  an  enclosure. 

No.  11.  Extracts  of  Letters  from  Governour  Hutchinson 


to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  27th  April, 
and  21st  May,  1770. 

No.  12.  Extractof  a  Letter  from  Governour  i/i/fc^jnson, 
to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  6th  July,  1771 ; 
with  a  copy  of  his  Message  to  the  House  of  Representatives, 
and  of  the  Answer  of  the  said  House. 

No.  13.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  28th  November, 

1771,  with  enclosures. 

No.  14.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  JE/u/cAinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  29th  May, 

1772,  with  an  enclosure. 

No.  15.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 

to  the  Earl  o( Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  23d  October,  1772. 

No.  16.  Copv  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 

to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  30th  October, 

1772,  with  enclosures. 

No.  17.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson  to 

the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  3d  November,  1772. 

No.  18.  Printed  copy  of  the  Votes  and  Proceedings  of 

the  Freeholders  and  Inhabitants  of  the  Town  of  Boston. 

No.  19.  ExtractofaLetterfrom Governour  jywicAiwsonto 

the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  22d  February,  1773. 

No.  20.  Printed  copy  of  the  Speeches  of  Governour 

Hutchinson  to  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Massachusetts 

Bay,  with  the  Answers  of   the  Council  and  House  of 

Representatives. 

No.  21.  Copy  of  Petition  and  Remonstrance  from  the 
House  of  Representatives  of  the  Province  o[  Massachusetts 
Bay,  14th  July,  1772. 

No.  22.  Copy  of  Petition  to  the  King  from  the  House 
of  Representatives  of  3Iassachusetts  Bay,  dated  6th  March, 
1773. 

No.  23.  Copy  of  a  Letter  from  Governour  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  14th  February, 
1774  ;  received  5th  April,  enclosing, 

No.  24.  Copy  of  Governour  Hutchinson's  Speech  to 
the  Council   and  House   of  Representatives,  and 
their  Answer. 
No.  25.  Copy  of  Requisition  from  the  House  of  Re- 
presentatives of  Massachusetts  Bay,  to  the  Judges 
of  the  Superiour  Court. 
No.  26.  Copy  of  a  Remonstrance  of  the  House  of 
Representatives  of  Massachusetts  i?«y,  against  the 
Chief  Justice. 
No.  27.  Copy  of  Vote  of  the  Council  and  House  of 
Representatives  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  for  adjourn- 
ing the  Superiour  Court;  not  consented  to  by  the 
Governour. 
No.  28.  Copy  of  Governour  Hutchinson's  Answer  to 
the  Remonstrance  of  the  House  of  Representatives 
against  tb.e  Chief  Justice. 
Ordered,  That  the  said  Papers  be  referred  to  the  Com- 
mittee appointed  to  inquire  into  the  several  proceedings 
in  the  Colony  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  opposition  to  the 
sovereignty  of  his  Majesty  in  his  Parliament  of  Great  Bri- 
tain over  that  Province  ;  and  also  what  has  passed  in  this 
House  relative  thereto,  from  the  1st  of  January,  1764. 

Wednesday,  April  20,  1774. 

The  Earl  of  Buckinghamshire  reported  fi'om  Report  fmm 
the  Lords'  Committee,  appointed  to  inquire  into  po'Jm'd'focou^ 
the  several  Proceedings  in  the  Colony  of  Mas-  '"i""'' P"'"^ 
sachusetts  Bail,  m  opposition  to  the  sovereignty  <-i>ionyoi  .wnJ- 
01  his  Majesty  m  his  Parliament  oi  Great  Bri- 
tain over  that  Province ;  and  also  what  has  passed  in  this 
House  relative  thereto,  from  the  1st  day  of  January,  1764, 
as  follows: — 

That  in  obedience  to  your  Lordships'  commands,  the 
Committee  have  met,  and  taken  into  consideration  the  mat- 
ters to  them  referred  ;  and  having  attentively  read  and  consi- 
dered the  several  Papers  which  have  been  laid  before  the 
House,  relative  to  the  Proceedings  in  the  Colony  of  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,  in  opposition  to  the  sovereignty  of  his  Ma- 
jesty in  his  Parliament  of  Great  Britain  over  that 
Province  ;  and  having  also  carefully  inspected  the  Journals 
of  the  House,  from  the  1st  day  of  January,  1764,  to  the 
|)resent  time,  they  find  that,  on  the  2d  day  joumai.,  April 
of  April,  1764,  a  Bill  was  brought  up  from  the  ^'  "■'^• 
Commons  to  your  Lordships,  intituled,  ''  An  Act  forgrant- 
"  ing  certain  Duties  in  the  British  Colonies  and  Plantations 


13 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  IMARCH  7,  1774. 


14 


"  in  America ;  for  continuing  and  amending,  and  making 
"  perpetual,  an  Act,  passed  in  tlie  sixth  year  of  the  reign 
"of  his  late  Majesty,  King  George  the  Second,  intituled 
" '  An  Act  for  the  better  securing  and  encouraging  the 
"  Trade  of  his  Majesty's  Sugar  Colonies  in  America;'  for 
"  applying  the  produce  of  such  Duties,  and  of  the  Duties  to 
"  arise  by  virtue  of  the  said  Act,  towards  defraying  the  ex- 
"  penses  of  defending,  protecting,  and  securing,  the  said 
"  Colonies  and  Plantations  ;  lor  explaining  an  Act,  made 
"  in  the  twenty-fifth  year  of  the  reign  of  King  Charles  the 
"  Second,  intituled  '  An  Act  for  the  Encouragement  of  the 
"  Greenland  and  Eastland  Trades,  and  for  the  better  se- 
"  curin«  the  Plantation  Trade  ;'  and  for  altering  and  dis- 
"  allowing  several  Drawbacks  on  Exports  from  this  King- 
"  dom,  and  more  effectually  preventing  the  clandestine 
"  conveyance  of  Goods  to  and  from  said  Colonies  and  Plan- 
"  taiions,  and  improving  and  securing  the  Trade  between 
"  the  same  and  Great  Britain." 

April  Mh  and        That  this  Bill  passed  the  House  on  the  4th 
*'*•         oi  April,  and  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the 
following  day. 

The  Committee  having   perused    the    Report   of  the 

Dtmuhrr  uth,  Board  of  Trade,  of  the  11th  day  oi  December, 

"Ti         1764,  and  the  Papers  laid  before  his  Majesty 

Hepiwuiaiion  therewith,  find  in  the  said  Papers  the  strongest 

or  llu-  Board  ol  .  '  ,  /•    i        31  i  7 

Trade  to  iiii  asscrtious  by  the  Assembly  ol  the  Massachusetts 
»j«t>-  Bay,  of  their  sole  right  to  pass  laws,  particu- 

larly of  taxation  ;  and  of  their  resolution  to  invite  the  other 
Colonies  to  combine  with  them  in  measures  to  prevent  the 
King,  in  his  Parliament,  from  passing  any  such  laws;  for 
instance,  in  a  letter  to  Mr.  Manduit,  then  Agent 
ExtracuVroin  of  the  Province,  which  was  drawn  up  by  a  Com- 
I.nh"-'Huus!.''of  niittee  of  the  House  of  Representatives,  and 
?f'tl['c;li''n')"ar  afterwards  approved  by  the  House,  they  used 


Maisachuicits    ji,g  following  exoressious 

Bm,   1st,    Sth,  .  °i       '1  1    1 

1  III,  and  utii  "  Provmce  should  nave 


JUM,  17M. 


;  "  The  silence  of  the 
been  imputed  to  any 


"  cause,  even  to  despair,  rather  than  be  con- 
"  strued  into  a  tacit  cession  of  their  rights,  or  an  acknow- 
"  ledgement  of  a  right  in  the  Parliament  of  Great  Britain 
"  to  impose  Duties  and  Taxes  upon  a  People  who  are  not 
"  represented  in  the  House  of  Commons  ;"  and  in  the  same 
letter  they  avowed  and  authenticated  the  doctrines  advanced 

in  a  certain  pamphlet,  intituled,  "  The  Rights 
o?.Vb,'Kikfrom  of  the  Brt^w/j Colouics  asserted  and  proved;" 
Sdof'the'CoUk   written  by  James  Otis,  Esq. ;  which  pamphlet, 

amongst  other  things,  says,  "  That  the  imposi- 
"  tion  of  taxes,  whether  on  trade  or  on  land,  on  houses  or 
"  ships,  on  real  or  personal,  fixed  or  floating  property,  in 
"  the  Colonies,  is  absolutely  irreconcilable  with  the  rights 
"  of  the  Colonists,  as  British  subjects,  and  as  men." 

■loiirnaii  Feb-  The  Committee  find  that,  on  the  28th  day 
ruaryii,  1795.  gf  February,  1765,  a  Bill  was  brought  from  the 
Commons,  intituled,  "An  Act  for  granting  and  applying 
"  Stamp  Duties  and  other  Duties  in  the  British  Colonies 
"and  Plantations  in  America;  towards  further  defraying 
"  the  expenses  of  defending,  protecting,  and  securing  the 
"  same  ;  and  for  amending  such  parts  of  the  several  Acts 
"  of  Parliament  relating  to  the  Trade  and  Revenues  of  the 
"  said  Colonies  and  Plantations,  as  direct  the  manner  of 
"  determining  and  recovering  the  penalties  and  forfeitures 
"  therein  mentioned." 

That  the  said  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  22d 
of  the  same  month. 

That   on   the   17th   day  of  December,  his 

Majesty  declared,  in  his  most  gracious  Speech 
from  the  Throne,  "That  tiie  matters  of  importance  which 
"  had  lately  occurred  in  some  of  his  Colonies  in  America, 
"  were  the  principal  cause  of  his  Majesty's  assembling  his 
"  Parliament  sooner  than  was  usual  in  times  of  peace." 
No.  17.  '^  appears  to  the  Committee,  from  the  voles 

Vote,  of  the  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of  the  Colony 

HouNe  nf  Rep-        -n--  ,  r^'  r   ^       ^   \        r   i 

re.entaiivr»,    ol  Massachusetts  Bau,  ol  the  oth  ol  June,  1765, 

June  Oth,  1765.      ,  •' '  ,       .  ,,  mi  . 

that  they  came  to  a  Kesolution,  "  That  it  was 
"  highly  expedient  there  should  be  a  meeting,  as  soon  as 
"  might  be,  of  Committees  from  the  Houses  of  Reprcsent- 
"  atives  or  Burgesses,  in  the  several  Colonies  on  the 
"  American  Continent,  to  consult  on  their  then  present 
"  circumstances,  and  the  diflicultics  to  which  they  were  re- 
"  duced  by  the  operation  of  the  late  Acts  of  Parliament, 
"  for  levying  Duties  on  the  Colonies,  and  to  consider  of  a 
"  general  Address  to  his  Majesty  and  the  Parliament,  to 


December  17th. 


"  implore  relief;  and  that  letters  should  be  forthwith. pre- 
"  pared  and  transmitted  to  the  respective  Speakers  of  the 
"  several  Assemblies,  to  invite  them  to  accede  to  ,y,,,  j„„e  sn, 
"  this  proposition  :"  and  further,  that  on  the  Sth  ""*'  ^°''''  ""• 
of  June,  they  did  actually  elect  three  persons  to  be  their 
Committees  ;  and  also  voted  £450  to  bear  their  exi)enses. 

Your  Committee  find,  in  a  letter  from  the  no.  21. 
Governor  to  the  Lords  Commissioners  for  Trade  ^tru'T'uiM, 
and  Plantations,  dated  August  15tl),  1765,  an  ;f,"*;i;"'''i'JIiji 
account  of  a  violent  riot  at  Boston,  in  resistance  comnn>*i™en 
to  a  law  passed  by  the  Legislature  of  Great  Plantations 
Britain,  in  which  an  attack  was  made  upon  Mr.  Oliver, 
Distributer  of  Stamps,  and  carried  to  the  length  of  pulling 
down  and  destroying  his  houses,  manilbstinii  a  resolution, 
if  they  could  have  found  him,  of  putting  him  to  death  ; 
upon  which  occasion  the  backwardness  and  indisposition  of 
the  Council  to  support  the  peace  and  good  order  of  Gov- 
ernment, were  very  ajjparent.  Also,  in  another  x„.  22. 
letter  from  the  Governor,  ihxted  August  31st,  fjfjfJfJt'TOo'J 
1765,  to  the  said  Board  of  Trade,  they  find  IZ^'J-I'I^'a^ 
that  the  mob  attacked  the  house  of  Mr.  Storey, 
Register  of  the  Admiralty,  which  they  demolished  ;  they 
also  took  all  his  books  and  papers,  amongst  which  were 
the  Records  of  the  Court  of  Admiralty,  and  burnt  them, 
and  searched  about  for  him,  with  an  intent  to  murder  him  ; 
they  also  pillaged  the  house  of  Mr.  Hallowe/l,  Comptroller 
of  the  Customs.  But  their  most  violent  proceeding  was 
against  the  Lieutenant  Governor,  whose  house,  plate, 
books,  and  manuscripts,  to  a  very  great  value,  they  totally 
destroyed.  And,  in  this  great  extremity,  the  Council 
being,  as  the  Governor  observes,  dependent  upon  the  peo- 
ple, refused  even  to  concur  with  him  in  his  proposition  of 
giving  notice  to  General  Gage  of  the  then  situation  of  the 
town  of  Boston. 

It  is  remarkable  that  this  commotion  entirely  To.zt. 
arose  out  of  the  town  oi  Boston  ;  for  though  it  i.f,r'(rj' i.tteito 
was  given  out  that  many  People  out  of  the  'ilaifai'^'ciiJit 
country  were  concerned  in  diis  affair,  upon  in-  ^/„'j"Tjth  ami 
quiry,  it  was  found  that  such  persons  living  out  '"'■'  ""■ 
of  Boston  as  were  seen  in  the  crowd,  were  there  merely  as 
spectators. 

In  Governor  Bernard's  letter  to  the  Board  of  xo.  m. 
Trade,  of  October  12th,  1765,  he  says,  "  That  ,,»"(/v'leite"o 
"  the  real  authority  of  the  Government  is  at  an  Vrade,"o«<p4o- 
"  end  ;  some  of  the  principal  ringleaders  in  the  '^''''  '""• 
"  late  riots,  walk  the  streets  with  impunity  ;  no  Officers  dare 
"  attack  them  ;  no  Attorney  General  prosecute  them  ;  no 
"  Witness  appear  against  them ;  and  no  Judges  sit  upon 
"them." 

And  during  the  general  disorder,  the  Gov-  ao^Iml^'Ber. 
ernor  thought  it  necessary  for  some  companies  'i";^f%["n"'Jy 
of  the  Militia  to  be  mustered,  with  the  unani-  c«atoy.fl"»rwi 

1    .  ,■    ■       /-<  Ml  1  I        nfi-   •       ^cvemOer  Hit, 

mous  advice  of  the  Councd,  but  that  the  Militia  ires. 
refused  to  obey  his  orders.  No.  71. 

,       ,  /.      1      1  1-     1         .  .  'J    Kxtr.ic-tof  a  ret- 

And  we  find  that  so  little  attention  was  paid  ter  from  Gov- 

to  an  Act  of  the  British  Legislature,  by  the  ,"'7.  pnvZit 

Council  and  House  of  Representatives,  that  ,^;,1o^".i,!j|^"j' 

they  resolved  in  a  joint  Committee,  on  the  •25th  j,,,^;,";,?-;;,,  „f 

of  October,  1765,  that  it  should  and  might  be  thicouiKiianci 

...  .    I  o  •    ?         House  (.f  Itt  ()- 

lawfiil  to  do  business  without  stamps,  notwith-  rMentativi,, 
Standing  the  Act  of  Parliament  to  the  contrary. 

On  the  14th  day  of  January,  1766,  upon  the  joumai>,  ymK- 
meeting  of  the  Parliament,  after  the  recess  at  "'"  ''"'''  ''""• 
Christmas,  his  Majesty  was  pleased  to  declare  himself  in  a 
most  gracious  Speech  from  the  throne,  in  the  following 
terms : 

"  My  Lords  and  Gentlemen :  When  I  met  you  last,  I 
"  acquainted  you  that  matters  of  importance  had  happen- 
"  ed  in  America,  which  would  demand  the  most  .serious 
"  attention  of  Parliament. 

"  That  no  information  which  could  serve  to  direct  your 
"  deliberations  in  so  interesting  a  concern  might  be  want- 
"  ing,  I  have  ordered  all  the  Papers  that  give  any  light 
"  into  the  origin,  the  jjrogress,  or  the  tendency,  of  the 
"  Disturliances  which  have  of  late  prevailed  in  some  of 
"  the  Northern  Colonies,   to  be  immediately  laid  before 

"  you. 

"  No  time  has  been  lost,  on  the  first  advice  of  these 
«  Disturbances,  to  issue  orders  to  the  Governors  of  my 
"  Provinces,  and  to  the  Commanders  of  my  Forces,  in 
"  America,  for  the  exertion  of  all  the  powers  of  the  Go- 


15 


KINGS  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


16 


January  <3. 


January  27. 


January  38. 
February  10. 


"  vernment  in  the  suppression  of  riots  and  tumults,  and  in 
"  the  effectual  support  of  lawful  authority. 

"  Whatever  remains  to  be  done  on  this  occasion,  I  coin- 
"  mit  to  your  wisdom,  not  doubting  but  your  zeal  for  the 
"  honor  of  my  Crown,  your  attention  to  the  just  rights  and 
"  authority  ot  the  British  Legislature,  and  your  afleclion 
"  and  concern  for  the  welfare  and  prosperity  of  all  my 
"  People,  will  guide  you  to  such  sound  and  prudent  resolu- 
"  tions  as  may  tend  at  once  to  preserve  those  constitutional 
"  rights  over  the  Colonies,  and  to  restore  to  them  that 
"  harmony  and  tranquillity  which  have  lately  been  inter- 
"  rupted  by  riots  and  disordere  of  the  most  dangerous  na- 
"  ture." 

In  the  dutiful  Address  which  was  voted  the  same  day, 
the  House  assure  his  Majesty,  "  of  their  hearty  concur- 
"  rence  with  his  Majesty's  most  salutary  intentions;  that 
"  they  would  exert  their  utmost  endeavours  to  assert  and 
"  support  his  Majesty's  dignity  and  honor,  and  the  legisla- 
"  tive  authority  of  this  Kingdom  over  its  Colonies ;  and 
"  that  they  would  take  into  tiieir  consideration  the  most 
"  proper  methods  to  provide  for  the  restoration  of  tranquil- 
"  litv  to  those  Colonies  which  had  been  disturbed  by  such 
"  violent  and  dangerous  commotions." 

Upon  the  same  day  all  the  Papers  relating  to 
joam.K  IMS.  jj^g  information  and  advices  received  from  Ame- 
rica, of  the  riots  and  tumults  there,  were  laid  before  the 
House. 

More  Papers  relating  to  America  were  laid 
before  the  House,  which,  together  with  the  other 
Papers,  were  referred  to  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House 
for  Tuesday,  tiie  28th. 

More  Papers  were  laid  before  the  House, 
and  referred  to  the  said  Committee. 

The  Committee  met,  and  after  several  ad- 
journments, on  the  10th  oi  February,  following, 
the  Chairman  reported  several  Resolutions,  which  were 
agreed  to  by  the  House,  as  follows : 

"  1.  Resolved,  That  the  King's  Majesty,  by  and  with  the 
advice  and  consent  of  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal, 
and  Conmions  of  Great  Britain,  in  Parliament  assembled, 
had,  hath,  and  of  right  ought  to  have,  full  power  and  au- 
thority to  make  Laws  and  Statutes  of  sufficient  force  and 
validity  to  bind  the  Colonies  and  People  of  America,  sub- 
jects of  the  Crown  of  Great  Britain,  in  all  cases  whatso- 
ever. 

"  2.  Resolved,  That  it  appears  to  this  Committee,  that 
Tumults  and  Insurrections  of  the  most  dangerous  nature, 
have  been  raised  and  carried  on  in  several  of  the  North 
American  Colonies,  in  open  de6ance  of  the  Power  and 
Dignity  of  his  Majesty's  Government,  and  in  manifest  viola- 
tion of  the  Laws  and  Legislative  authority  of  this  Kingdom. 
"  3.  Resolved,  That  it  appears  to  this  Committee  that  the 
said  Tumults  and  Insurrections  have  been  encouraged  and 
inflamed  by  sundry  Votes  and  Resolutions,  passed  in  seve- 
ral of  the  Assemblies  of  the  said  Provinces,  derogatory  to 
the  honor  of  his  Majesty's  Government,  and  destructive  of 
the  legal  and  constitutional  dependency  of  the  said  Colo- 
nies on  the  Imperial  Crown  and  Pariiament  of  Great  Bri- 
tain. 

"  4.  Resolved,  That  it  is  the  opinion  of  this  Committee, 
that  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his  Majesty,  to 
desire  that  his  Majesty  would  be  graciously  pleased  to  give 
instructions  to  the  Governors  of  the  several  Provinces 
wlicre  the  above  mentioned  Tumults  and  Insurrections  have 
happened,  that  they  should,  in  his  Majesty's  name,  require 
of  the  Asseniblies  of  the  said  Provinces,  to  make  proper 
recompense  to  those  who  have  suffered  in  their  persons 
or  properties,  in  consequence  of  the  aforesaid  Tumults  and 
Insurrections ;  and  to  assure  his  Majesty  that  this  House 
will,  upon  this  and  all  occasions,  support  the  lawful  authori- 
ty of  his  Crown,  and  the  rights  of  Parliament. 

"  5.  Resolved,  That  it  is  the  opinion  of  this  Committee, 
that  all  his  Majesty's  subjects,  residing  in  tiie  said  Colonies, 
who  have  manifested  their  desire  to  comply  with,  or  to  as- 
sist in,  carrying  into  execution,  the  Act  for  laying  a  duty  on 
Stamps,  or  any  other  Act  of  Pariiament,  in  the  British 
Colonies  in  North  America, h'd\e  acted  as  dutiful  and  loyal 
subjects,  and  are  therefore  entitled  to,  and  will  assuredly 
have,  the  favor  and  protection  of  this  House." 

"  Ordered,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  pursuant  to  the  fourth  Resolution." 


On  the  5th  of  March,  &  Bill  was  brought  war.Ajth. 
from  the  Commons,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the 
"  better  securing  the  Dependency  of  his  Majesty's  Domin- 
"  ions   in  America  upon  the  Crowti  and   Parliament  of 
"  Great  Britain." 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  18lh  of  the 
same  month. 

And  also  a  Bill  intituled,  "  An  Act  to  repeal  an  Act  made 
"  in  the  last  session  of  Pariiament  intituled,  '  An  Act  for 
"  granting  and  applying  certain  Stamp  Duties,  and  other  du- 
"  ties  in  the  British  Colonies  and  Plantations  in  America; 
"  towards  further  defraying  the  expenses  of  defending,  pro- 
'•■  tecting,  and  securing  the  same;  and  for  amending  such 
"  parts  of  the  several  Acts  of  Parliament  relating  to  the 
"  Trade  and  Revenues  of  the  said  Colonies  and  Planta- 
"  tions,  as  direct  the  manner  of  determining  and  recover- 
"  ing  the  penalties  and  forfeitures  therein  mentioned.'  " 

VVhich  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the    March  isih. 
18th  of  March. 

Whilst  the  Bill  for  repealing  the  Stamp  Act  was  under 
deliberation,  petitions  from  the  Merchants  of  the  city  of 
Bristol,  from  the  Merchants  of  Glasgow,  from  Edtvard 
Montague,  Agent  for  the  Colony  of  Virginia,  and  from 
the  Merchants  of  the  city  of  London,  in  favor  of  the  said 
repeal,  were  received  and  read. 

On  the  2d  of  June,  a  Bill  was  brought  from  juneu. 
the  Commons,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  indemni- 
"  fying  persons  who  have  incurred  certain  penalties  inflicted 
"  by  an  Act  of  the  last  session  of  Pariiament,  '  for  granting 
"  certain  Stamp  Duties  in  the  British  Colonies  and  Plaa- 
"  tations  in  America ;'  and  for  making  valid  all  instruments 
"  executed  or  enrolled  there  on  unstamped  paper,  vellum, 
"  or  parchment." 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  6th  of 
the  same  month. 

It  appears  by  a  letter  from  Governor  Ber-       j,„  ,„_ 
nard  to  the  Earl  of  Shelburne,  dated  Decern-  £»'">'<  of » let- 

ipr  Iron)    *jOv. 

ber  24tb,  1766,  that  the  Governor,  by  advice  Brrnm rf,  to tho 
of  the  Council,  ordered  the  Mutmy  Act  and  *urn<-,  Bottm, 
three  other  Acts  to  be  printed  by  the  Printer  "^'  ' 
of  the  Laws,  in  the  interval  of  the  adjournment  of  the 
Assembly.  Two  companies  of  Artillery  being  driven  on 
shore  by  distress  of  weather,  and  the  said  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment having  been  consulted,  the  Council  advised  the 
Governor  to  order  the  Commissary  to  supply  them  with 
what  they  demanded  under  the  Act,  which  was  done.  Upon 
the  meeting  of  the  Assembly  a  Message  was  sent  to  the 
Council,  and  carried  by  five  members,  to  inquire  "  by  what 
"  authority  Acts  of  Parliament  were  registered  amongst 
"  the  laws  of  that  Province ;  and  whether  they  knew  of 
"  any  Act  (meaning  of  Assembly)  requiring  the  registering 
"  of  Ordinances  (their  term  for  Acts  of  Parliament)  which 
"  their  Legislature  never  consented  to." 

The  Committee  find  that,  on  the   12th  of    j„„n„], 
March,  1767,  the  Ixird  Wycombe  (by  his  Ma-     ^"^"^Aiith. 
jesty's  command)  laid  before  the  House  copies 
of  letters,  &.c.,  from  his  Majesty's  Governors  in  America, 
which  were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

That  on  the  3d  oi  April  more  copies  of  let-     ApriiM. 
ters  from  his  Majesty's  Governors  in  America, 
were  laid  before  the  House,  and  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

That  on  the  14tli  of  May,  it  was  ordered 
that  an  humble  Address  should  be  presented  to 
his  Majesty,  "  That  he  would  be  graciously  pleased  to 
"  give  directions  that  there  might  be  laid  before  this  House 
"  copies  of  all  Reports  made  to  or  by  the  Commissioners 
"  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  together  with  all  Orders  and 
"  Proceedings  made  or  had  by  the  Secretaries  of  State,  or 
"  his  Majesty's  Privy  Council,  relating  to  the  Bill  passed 
"  by  the  Governor,  Council,  and  Assembly  of  the  Massa- 
"  chusctts  Bay,  for  granting  compensation  to  the  sufferers, 
"  and  of  free  and  general  pardon,  indemnity,  and  oblivion 
"  to  the  offenders  in  the  late  times,  from  the  time  of  the 
"  receipt  of  the  said  Bill." 

That  on  the  18th  day  of  May,  pursuant  to     May  isth. 
the  said  Address,  the  Lord  Wycombe  laid  before 
the  House,  a  copy  of  the   Report  of  the  Committee  of 
Council,  &ic.,  wliich  papers  were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

That  on  the  same  day  it  was  ordered,  that  an  humble 
Address  should  be  presented  to  his  Majesty,  "  That  he 
"  would  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  directions,  that  there 


May  14th. 


17 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


18 


May  32d. 


Jutu  t3lh. 


"  might  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  of  such  prece- 
"  dents  as  had  been,  or  might  be  found,  of  Orders  in  Coun- 
"  cil,  declaring  Acts  of  Assembly  in  America,  to  be  null, 
"  illegal,  or  void;  togetiier  with  Reports  of  the  several 
"  Attorneys,  and  Solicitors  General,  or  either  of  them,  in 
"  similar  cases,  read  at  the  Council  Board  on  the  9th  in- 
"  stant." 

That  on  the  22d  of  May,  the  Lord  Wycombe, 
(by  his  Majesty's  command,)  laid  before  the 
House  copies  of  such  precedents  as  had  been  found,  of 
Orders  in  Council,  declaring  Acts  of  Assemblies  in  America 
to  be  null,  illegal,  and  void  ;  together  with  Reports  of  the 
several  Attorneys,  and  Solicitoi-s  General,  or  either  of  them, 
in  similar  cases. 

Which  Papers  were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table  ;  and  from 
a  perusal  of  them  we  find  that  several  Acts  of  different 
Colonies  have  been,  from  time  to  time,  declared  by  his 
Majesty  in  Council,  to  be  null,  illegal,  and  void. 

That  on  the  15th  of  June  a  Bill  was  brought 
juncin  .        ^p  j.^^^  ^1^^  Commons  intituled,  "  An  Act  to 

"  enable  his  Majesty  to  put  the  Customs  and  other  Duties 
"  in  the  British  Dominions  in  America,  and  the  execution 
"  of  the  laws  relating  to  Trade  there,  under  the  manage- 
"  ment  of  Commissioners  to  be  appointed  for  that  purpose, 
"  and  to  be  resident  in  the  said  Dominions. 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  29th  of  the 
same  month. 

That  on  the  18th  of  June  a  Bill  was  brought 
up  from  the  Commons,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for 
"  granting  certain  Duties  in  the  British  Colonies  and  Plan- 
"  tations  in  America  ;  for  allowing  a  drawback  of  the  duties 
"  of  Customs  upon  the  exportation  from  this  Kingdom  of 
"  coffee  and  cocoa  nuts,  of  the  produce  of  the  said  Co- 
"  lonies  or  Plantations ;  for  discontinuing  the  drawbacks 
"  payable  on  china  earthen  ware,  expoited  to  America ; 
"  and  for  more  effectually  preventing  the  clandestine  run- 
•'  ning  of  goods  in  the  said  Colonies  and  Plantations." 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  29th  of 
June. 

No.  116.  ^  Th^  Committee  find  that,  on  the  meeting  of 

No.  117.  \  the  Assembly  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts 
M«Mg,fron.  Bay,  on  the  2Sth  of  January,  1767,  a  Message 
the  Hi.uie  of  y^ag  ggnt  to  the  Governor  from  the  House  of 
to  (iovemor  Representatives  desiringto  be  informed,  "  Whe- 
«id  i'lra'prilate  "  tlier  any  provision  had  been  made  at  the 
SLr«,''dai  "  expense  of  that  Government  for  the  King's 
r4''«.T'mh;  "  Troops  lately  arrived  in  the  harbour  of  Bos- 
i767,aiso  us. '  u  (fy„  ."  a„(}  that  after  having  had  the  Minutes  of 
Council  (by  which  it  expressly  appeared  that  the  provision 
for  the  Artillery  companies  at  the  Castle,  was  made  in  pur- 
suance of  the  then  late  Act  of  Parliament)  laid  before 
them,  they  replied  that,  "  In  giving  orders,  with  the  advice 
"  of  the  Council,  for  making  provision  for  the  Artillery 
"  companies  at  the  Castle  the  Governor  had  acted  in  an 
"  essential  point  against  the  plain  intention  of  the  Charter, 
"  by  which  alone,  and  that  only,  according  to  such  Acts  as 
"  are  or  may  be  in  force  within  this  Province,  the  Governor 
"  and  Council  were  authorized  to  i.ssue  money  out  of  the 
"  Treasury  ;  "  adding,  "  That  it  was  still  more  grevious  to 
"  them  to  find  the  Governor  stating,  as  the  foundation  of 
"  the  proceeding,  a  late  Act  of  Parliament,  which  to  them 
"  appeared  as  great  a  grievance  as  the  Stamp  Act,  which 
"  took  away  the  unalienable  right  of  freedom  from  all 
"  Taxation,  but  such  as  they  should  voluntarily  consent  to 
"  and  grant." 

No  115.  Governor  Bernard  was  obliged  in  his  Re- 

t^r'Troin'ooT  joinder,  14th  and  18th  Fc'6n<nry,1767, carefully 
Beniarii to Kir\  to  avoid  giving  the  Act  of  Parliament  as  the 
loB,  i4ih  and  foundation  ot  the   provision  made :    he  would 

laih Frf.  1787.         ,  .  »  1  1      1  .u  r  »i 

otherwise  not  have  had  the  concurrence  ol  the 
Council ;  for  though  the  greater  part,  he  believed,  had  a 
due  respect  for  Acts  of  Parliament,  not  one  of  them  would 
have  dared  to  avow  it  in  that  instance,  and  at  that  time. 
Journal.  jtfarcA  The  Committee  find  that,  on  the  2d  of  March, 
2d,  1768.  1768,  a  Bill  was  brought  up  from  the  Commons, 

intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the  more  easy  and  effectual  recove- 
"  ry  of  the  Penalties  and  Forfeitures  inflicted  by  the  Acts 
"  of  Pariiament,  relating  to  the  Trade  or  Revenues  of  the 
"  British  Colonies  and  Plantations  in  America." 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  8th  of  the 
same  month. 

Fourth  Series.  2 


It  appears  to  the  Committee,  that  by  a  cir-  cTrcui^u^'r 
cular  letter  from  the  House  of  Representatives  ron<aii>ed  in 
of  the  Colony  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  address-  toK-'sMiiZnt. 
ed  to  all  the  Assemblies  upon  the  Continent  of  fX^rn'mt'. 
North  America,  they  desired  the  assent  of 
those  Assemblies  to  their  sentiments  and  proceedings  ;  ac- 
quainting them,  that  they  had  represented  to  his  Majesty 
that  the  Acts  of  Parliament  of  Great  Britain,  imposing 
duties  upon  that  Province,  with  the  sole  and  express  pur- 
pose of  raising  a  Revenue,  are  infringements  of  their 
natural  constitutional  rights,  and  desired  them  to  point  out 
any  thing  further  that  might  be  necessary  to  cany  their 
system  into  execution. 

In  this  year  the  Assembly,  at  the  election  oo^'a^nmrd', 
of  the  Council,  left  out  all  the  Crown  Officers,  '"'"  «>  Lord' 
which  measure  had  been  before  adopted,  in  "th.  "k,  ''ma 
the  years  1766  and  1767.  'S.Z.'^'' 

In  the  beginning  of  May,  1768,  subscriptions       ^^  j^, 
were  made,  and  Associations  entered  into,  for  gov.  arnoVrf'^ 
the  non-importation  of  goods  from  Great  Bri-  nes,  and  May 
tain ;  but  tliis  last  measure  was  at  that  time       ' '  ^' 
defeated  by  the  merchants  in  the  other  Colonies  refusing 
to  concur  in  it. 

On  the  9th  day  of  May,  1768,  regular  seizure  „.  '^°-  '^^. 
was  made  by  the  Collector  and  Comptroller  of  """'''  'i-""  "f 
the  Customs,  of  the  sloop  Liberty,  belonging  f- sMiJnU ; 
to  Mr.  Hancock,  of  the  town  of  Boston,  which  ''""no^'it'j!" 
occasioned  a  most  violent  tumult ;  the  Collector •  nS^^.f  Vh^ 
and  Comptroller,  with  the  son  of  the  Collector,  'f"',h"'cu™^. 
were  attacked  by  a  numerous  and  outrageous  'p ">i- 1"''''"''" 

111  11  •  *''*^      '  reasiir)-, 

mob,  who  beat  and  abused  them  in  a  most  cruel  Junemb,n6%; 
manner ;  and  in  the  night  attacked  their  houses, 
broke  the  windows,  seized  on  a  boat  belonging  to  the  Col- 
lector, which  they  carried  away  in  triumph,  and  afterwards 
burnt.  The  Commissioners  of  the  Customs  expecting  the 
same  treatment,  the  riot  still  continuing,  thought  it  pnident 
to  retreat  for  safety  till  midnight  with  their  families,  to  the 
houses  of  some  persons  in  the  neighbourhood ;  and  after- 
wards, upon  conviction  that  their  lives  were  in  danger,  took 
refiige  on  board  his  Majesty's  ship  the  Romney,  then  in 
the  harbour  of  Boston ;  and  for  their  further  security,  from 
thence  into  Castle  William.  During  the  time  of  this,  their 
perilous  situation,  they  applied  several  times  by  letter  to  the 
Governor  and  Council  for  protection,  but  couM  procure  no 
assistance  whatsoever ;  and  were  finally  told,  in  a  letter 
from  Governor  Bernard,  dated  June  13th,  that  "  After 
"  several  hours  deliberation  of  the  necessity  of  taking  some 
"  measures  to  preserve  the  peace  of  the  town,  and  what 
"  those  measures  should  be,  the  Council  had  come  to 
'•  resolution  that,  as  there  appeared  to  be  no  immediate 
•'  danger  of  further  violences,  they  were  of  opinion  that  it 
"  would  be  best  to  refer  this  matter  to  the  consideration  of 
"  a  Committee  of  both  Houses,  and  that  therefore  the 
"  Governor  at  present  could  not  let  them  know  what  kind 
"  of  aid  and  protection  they  might  expect  to  receive." 
The  consequence  of  which  was,  that  they  received  no 
protection  whatsoever.  The  disorder  and  con-  ^.^  ^^ 
fusion  remained  in  this  state  unnoticed  till  the  J.""™'''  "'j^J 
22d  July,  when  the  Governor  moved  the  Coun-  «"d  swh  July, 
cil  to  take  into  consideration  some  measures  for 
restoring  vigor  and  firmness  to  Government ;  but  on  the 
29th  of  July,  the  Council  made  a  reply  to  what  had  been 
proposed  to  them  by  the  Governor,  in  which  they  state, 
"  That  the  disorders  which  happened  were  occasioned  by 
"  the  violent  and  unprecedented  manner  in  which  the  sloop 
"  Liberty  had  been  seized  by  the  officers  of  the  Cus- 
"  toms." 

In  consequence  of  this  disorderly  state  at  N„,ra'tiv''poftiie 
Boston,  two  regiments  having  been  set  thi-  '?"■  ,''„"^'" 
ther  from  Halifax,  m  order  to  support  the 
execution  of  the  civil  power,  and  preserve  the  peace  of 
the  town,  strict  orders  were  given,  and  repeated  to  the 
troops,  not  to  quarrel  with  the  townsmen,  by  whom  they 
complained  they  had  been  frequently  ill  treated  and  in- 
sulted. 

On  Monday,  the  5th  of  March,  1768,  at  nine  at  night,  the 
alarm  bells  were  rung,  as  in  cases  of  fire  :  the  fire  said  to  be 
in  Kings  street,  and  the  People  thereby  led  thither,  where, 
finding  the  alarm  false,  they  joined  a  multitude  who  had 
been  braving  two  companies  at  the  gates  of  their  barrack, 
and  threatened  with  death  the  centinel  who  was  posted  at 


t9 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


•iO 


Cafiuiiu    Prtt- 

f«ll*«  COiC. 


the  custom  house,  where  the  King's  treasure  was  lodged. 
Tlie  ceniiiiel  being  surrounded  was  forced  to  retreat,  and 
call  for  aid,  wliicii  brought  Captain  rrvston,  Captain  of 
the  day,  with  a  party  Iroin  tiie  main  guiird,  to  extricate 
hira.  'I'liat  ofiicer  used  his  utmost  endeavours 
to  prevent  mischief,  notwithstanding  wliich,  the 
rioters  by  blows  and  every  act  of  aggravation, 
drew  upon  themsLlves  the  fire  of  several  of  the  soldiers, 
by  which  some  pt-rsons  unfortunately  were  killed  ;  and  upon 
the  Governor's  olier.ng  to  obtain  tiie  Coinmandiiig  Oliicer's 
consent  to  remove  one  of  the  regiments  to  tlie  Castle,  and 
to  station  the  other  so  as  no  opportunity  of  disputes  with 
the  townsmen  shoulJ  remain,  the  Counc.l  insisted  tliat  both 
.J,  ,„  regiments  should  go,  giving  fur  a  reason  that 
(.i.ui.  g'.v.  tlie  People  would  most  certainly  drive  out  the 
rhr*KT'-uf  troops  and  that  tiie  inliahiiants  of  otlier  towns 
Sr-^'l-  would  join  with  Jhston  in  it;  an.l  several  of 
Marc',,  1774.  ^^^^^^^  declared,  that  they  did  not  judge  Iroin  the 
general  ten.per  of  the  People  only,  but  they  knew  it  to  be 
the  determination,  not  of  a  mob,  but  of  the  generality  ol 
the  principal  inhabitants;  in  consequence  of  which  both 
ref'inients  were  accordingly  removed. 

".  In  the  Petition  presented  to  the  Governor 

petili.m'?^'.i.e  by  several  People  of  consideration,  in  pursuance 
r"<°m°r'  of  a  resolution  of  a  town  meeting,  held  at  that 
fr.TTVr™  time,  they  disavow  the  Legislative  authority  of 
""■'"•  this  country,  and  assert  that  it  wculd  be  better 

for  them  to  struggle  against  it,  than  tamely  to  relinquish 

their  rights.  ,      ,     ,      ,        r     _■  u 

And  the  Assembly  absolutely  refused,  by  a 
*mw°'r"f'ihe  ^reat  majority,  to  rescind  their  former  order 
"""■»I'iv«Tf  of  sending  circular  letters  to  the  other  Colonies, 
IL^'uMhV'of-  though  tliey  had  received  a  positive  requisition 
wrmir.juntJo,  from^hc  Crowii  to  that  pur|)ose. 

An  Association  was  entered  into  the  beginning 
s?r°"'v«n«,  of  August,  wiion  most  of  the  merchants  of 
Mi"Zg.'.'\"'il  Boston  entered  into  and  subscribed  an  agree- 
Ttl'T  "'"''"^  ment,  that  they  would  not  send  for,  or  import, 
any  kind  of  goods  or  merchandise  from  Great 
Britain,  some  few  articles  of  necessity  excepted,  from  the 
1st  of  January,  1769,  to  the  1st  of  Januari/,  1770  ;  and 
that  they  would  not  import  any  tea,  paper,  glass,  or 
painters'  colours,  until  the  Act,  unposing  duties  on  those 
articles,  should  be  repealed. 

It  was  also  voted  in  a  town  meeting  of  the 
vrJ^l%  «t  freeholders  and  other  inhabitants  of  Boston, 
the  town  nif  I-  Sevtemhcr  12th,  that  the  levying  money  within 

inr  »t   Bm  on,      ,  ^r    ,^        .  I-  ,  1  •  r  .1 

September uiii.  that  Proviuce,  lor  tlie  use  and  service  ol  the 
1768.  Crown,  in  other  manner  than  the  same  is  grant- 

ed by  the  great  and  general  Court  or  Assembly  of  the 
Province,  was  in  violation  of  the  said  Royal.  Charter,  and 
the  same  was  also  in  violation  of  the  undoubted  natural 
riffhts  of  subjects,  declared  in  the  aforesaid  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment, (meaning  the  Act  of  Succession,)  freely  to  give  and 
grant  tiieir  own  money  for  the  service  of  the  Crown,  with 
their  own  consent  in  person,  or  by  Representatives  of  their 
own  free  election. 

They  also  voted  tliat,  as  the  Governor  did  not 
think  proper  to  call  a  general  Court  for  the 
redress  of  their  (supposed)  grievances,  the  town  should 
tlien  make  choice  of  a  suitable  number  of  persons  to  act  for 
them  as  a  Committee  in  Convention,  w'ith  such  as  migbt 
be  sent  to  join  them  from  the  several  towns  in  that  Pro- 
yince,  in  order  that  such  measures  might  be  consulted  and 
advised  as  his  Majesty's  service,  and  the  peace  and  safety 
of  his  subjects  in  the  Province,  might  require. 

They  also  voted  tliat,  as  t'lcre  was  at  that  time  a  pre- 
vailing apprehension  in  the  minds  of  many,  of  an  approach- 
ing war  with  France,  in  order  that  the  inhabitants  of  that 
town  might  be  prepared,  in  case  of  sudden  ('anger,  that 
those  of  the  said  inhabitants  who  might  at  that  time  be  un- 
provided, should  he,  and  thereby  were,  requested  duly  to 
observe  at  that  time  the  law  of  the  Province,  whereby  it  is 
required  that  every  listed  soldier  and  other  householder, 
(except  troopers,  who  by  law,  are  otherwise  to  be  provi- 
ded,) shall  always  be  provided  with  a  well  fixed  firelock, 
musket,  accoutrement,  and  ammunition,  as  in  the  said  law 
Is  particularly  mentioned,  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  com- 
missioned officers  of  the  company. 

Tliey  also  voted  that  a  letter  should  be  written 
to  the  several  towns  \a  the  Provicce,  zs  follows  : 


"  Gentlemen  :  You  are  already  too  well  ac-       no.iis. 
quainted  with  the  melancholy  and  very  alarming  Jv',',',"Ii'.l'  sfu^I 
circumstances  to  which  this  l^rovince,  as  well  .t'^.'.'.^.Iif;!';^ 
as  America  in  general,  is  now  reduced  ;  taxes,  i?"*- 
eciually  detrimental  to  the    commercial    interests    of  the 
Parent  Country    and  her  Colonies,  are  imposed  on   the 
People  without  their  consent;  taxes  designed  for  the  su|)- 
port  of  the  civil  Government  in  the  Colonics,  in  a  manner 
clearly  unconstitutional,  an^l  contrary  to  that  in  which,  till 
of  late.  Government  has  been  supported  by  the  free  gift  of 
tiie  People  in  the  Ameririin  Asseiablics  or  Parliaments;  as 
also  for  the  maintenance  of  a  large  stand.ng  army,  not  for 
the  defence  of  the  newly  acquired  Terrltorits,  lut  for  the 
old  Colonies,  and  in  time  of  peace.     Ti:e  decent,  humble, 
and  truly  loyal  applications  and  petitions  from  the  Kcprt- 
scntatives  of  this  l*rovince,  for  the  redress  of  these  heavy 
and  very  threatening  grievances,  have  hitherto  been  inef- 
fectual, being  assured  from  authentic  intelligence,  that  they 
have  not  yet  readied  the  Royal  ear.     Tne  only  elfect  of 
transmitting  applications  liitherto  perceivahle,  I  as   been  a 
mandate  from  one  of  his  Majesty's  Secretaries  of  State  to 
the  Governor  of  iliis  Province,  to  dissolve  the  General 
Assembly,  merely  because  the  late  Ilcuse  of  Representa- 
tives refused  to  resc'nd  a  resolution  of  a  former  House, 
which  implied  nothing  more  than  a  right  in  the  American 
subjects  to  unite  in   humble  and  dut  ful  petitions  to  their 
gracious  Sovereign,  when  they  found  themselves  aggrieved. 
Tiiis  is  aright  naturally  inherent  in  every  man,  and  express- 
ly recognised  at  the  glorious  revolution,  as  the  birth-right 
of  an  Englishman. 

"  Tnis  dissolution  you  are  sensible  has  taken  pla?e.  The 
Governor  has  publicly  and  repeatedly  declared  that  he 
cannot  call  another  Assembly  ;  and  the  Secretary  of  State 
for  the  American  Dejiartinent,  in  one  of  liis  letters,  com- 
municated to  the  House,  has  been  p 'eased  to  say,  "  That 
"  proper  care  will  be  taken  for  the  support  of  the  dignity  of 
"  Government ;"  the  meaning  of  which  is  too  plain  to  be 
niisundeistood.  The  concern  and  perplexity  into  which 
these  things  have  thrown  the  People,  have  been  greatly 
aggravated  by  a  late  declaration  of  his  Excellency  Govern- 
or Bernard,  that  one  or  more  regiments  may  be  expect- 
ed in  this  Province. 

"  Tlie  design  of  these  troops  is  in  every  one's  apprehen- 
sion, nothing  short  of  enforcing,  by  military  pows  r,  the 
execution  of  Acts  of  Parliament,  in  the  forming  of  which 
the  Colonies  have  not,  and  cannot  have,  any  constitutional 
influence.  This  is  one  of  the  greatest  distresses  to  which  a 
free  People  can  be  reduced. 

"  The  town  which  we  have  the  honorto  serve,  have  taken 
these  things,  at  their  late  meeting,  into  their  most  serious 
consideration  :  and  as  there  is  in  the  minds  of  many  a  pre- 
vailing apprehension  of  an  approaching  war  with  Fratice, 
they  have  passed  the  several  votes  which  we  transmit  to 
you,  desiring  that  tliey  may  be  immediately  laid  before  the 
town,  whose  prudentials  are  in  your  care,  at  a  legal  meet- 
ing, for  their  candid  and  particular  attention. 

"  Deprived  of  the  counsels  of  a  General  Assembly  in  this 
dark  and  dillicult  season,  the  loyal  People  of  tliis  Province 
will,  we  are  persuaded,  immediately  perceive  the  propriety 
and  utility  of  the  proposed  Committee  of  Convention,  and 
the  sound  and  wholesome  advice  that  may  be  expected 
from  a  number  of  gentlemen  chosen  by  themselves,  and  in 
whom  they  may  repose  the  greatest  confidence,  must  tend 
to  the  real  service  of  our  most  gracious  Sovereign,  and  the 
welfare  of  his  subjects  in  this  Province,  and  may  happily 
prevent  any  sudden  and  unconnected  measures,  which,  in 
their  present  anxiety,  and  even  agony  of  mind,  they  may 
be  in  danger  of  failing  into. 

"  And  it  is  of  inipoitance  that  the  Convention  should 
meet  as  soon  as  may  be ;  so  early  a  day  as  the  22d  of  this 
instant,  ISeptember,  has  been  proposed  for  that  purpose ;  arid 
it  is  hoped,  the  remotest  towns  will  by  that  time,  or  as  soon 
after  as  conveniently  may  be,  return  their  respective  Com- 
mittees.    - 

"  Not  doubting  but  you  are  equally  concerned  with  us, 
and  our  fellow  citizens,  for  the  preservation  of  our  invaluable 
rights,  and  for  the  general  happiness  of  our  ceuntry,  and 
that  you  are  disposed,  with  equal  ardour,  to  exert  yourselves 
in  every  constitutional  way  for  so  glorious  a  purpose." 

The  Committee  observe,  that  it  does  not  appear  to  them 
that  any  steps  were  taken  to  suppress  these  measures,  or 


31 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


22 


that  they  were  noticed*  of  by  the  Council,  or  any  of  the 
Civil  Magistrates. 

The  Committee  tliink  it  necessary  here  to  insert  the  fol- 
lowing extracts. 

Journals,   Ko-       Tlio  first  extract  is  from  his  Majesty's  most 
vemi,era,nus.  g^jj^io^s  Spcechfrom  the  Throne,  on  the  Hth 

day  of  JSovcmhcr,  1768  : 

"  At  the  close  of  the  Inst  Parliament,  I  expressed  my 
"  satisfaction  at  the  appearances  whicii  then  induced  me  to 
4*  believe,  that  such  of  my  subjects  as  had  been  misled  in 
"  some  parts  of  my  Dominions,  were  returning  to  a  just 
"  sense  of  their  duty  ;  but  it  is  with  equal  concern  that  I 
"  have  since  seen  tliat  spirit  of  faction  which  1  had  hoped 
"  was  well  nigh  extinguished,  breaking  out  afresh  in  some  of 
"  my  Colonies  in  JSoith  America,  and  in  one  of  them,  pro- 
"  ceeding  even  to  acts  of  violence,  and  of  resistance  to  the 
"  execution  of  the  law  ;  the  capital  town  of  which  Colony 
"  appears,  by  late  advises,  to  be  in  a  state  of  disobedience  to 
"  all  law  and  Government,  and  has  proceeded  to  measures 
"  subversive  of  the  Constitution,  and  attended  withcircum- 
"  stances  that  manifi.st  a  disposition  to  throw  off  their  de- 
"  pendence  on  Great  Britain.  On  my  part  1  have  pur- 
"  sued  every  measure  tiiat  appeared  to  be  necessary  (or 
"  supporting  the  Constitution,  and  inducing  a  due  obedience 
"  to  tiie  authority  of  the  Legislature.  You  may  rely  upon 
"  my  steady  perseverance  in  these  purposes  ;  and  I  doubt 
"  not  but  tliai,  with  your  concurrence  and  support,  I  shall  be 
"  able  to  defeat  the  niischevious  designs  of  those  turbulent 
"  and  seditious  persons,  who,  under  false  pretences,  have 
"  but  too  successfully  deluded  numbers  of  my  subjects  in 
"  America,  and  who^e  practices,  if  sufiered  to  prevail,  cannot 
"  fail  to  produce  the  most  fatal  consequences  to  my  Colonies 
"  inunediately,  and  in  the  end,  to  all  the  Dominions  of  my 
"  Crown." 

The  second  extract  is  from  your  Lordsiiips 
y«t«rm  <rr9t  -    jj^,jjc^,[  ^ddress  to  his  Majesty  on  his  said  most 

gracious  Speech : 

"  We  feel  the  most  sincere  concern,  that  any  of  our  fel- 
"  low  subjects  in  North  America,  should  be  misled  by  fac- 
"  tious  and  designing  men,  into  acts  of  violence,  and  of 
"  resistance  to  the  execution  of  the  law,  attended  witii  cir- 
"  cumstances  that  manifest  a  disposition  to  throw  off  their 
"  dependence  upon  Great  BritcAn.  At  the  same  time  that 
'•  we  shall  be  always  ready  to  contribute  to  tlie  relief  of  any 
"  real  grievance  of  your  Majesty's  American  subjects,  we 
"  mostunfeignedly  give  your  Majesty  the  strongest  assuran- 
"  ces,  that  we  shall  ever  zealously  concur  in  support  of  such 
"just  and  necessary  measures,  as  may  best  enable  your 
"  Majesty  to  repress  that  daring  spirit  of  disobedience,  and 
"  to  enforce  a  due  submission  to  the  laws  ;  always  consider- 
"  ing  that  it  is  one  of  our  most  essential  duties  to  maintain 
"  inviolate  the  supreme  authority  of  the  Legislature  of 
"  Great  Britain  over  every  part  of  the  Dominions  of  your 
"  Majesty's  Crown." 

The  third  extract  is  from  his  Majesty's  most  gracious 
Answer  to  your  Lordships  Address  : 

"  Your  zealous  concurrence  in  every  measure 
s<n-irti  fi  1  1 1.  ;;  ^Y,^^  (..^f,  bring  relief  to  my  People  is  well  known 

"  tome,  nor  do  I  doubt  of  the  attention  that  you  will  always 
'•  give  to  any  real  grievances  of  my  American  subjects. 
"  The  strong  assurances  1  receive  from  you  at  the  same 
"  time  of  your  determination  to  vindicate  the  just  Legisla- 
"  live  authority  of  Parliament  over  all  the  Dominions  of 
"  my  Crown,  deserve  my  warmest  approbation. 

The  Conunittee  find  that  on  the  15th  of 
°"""  ""  '  Novcm'jer,  the  Lord  Harwich  acquainted  the 
House,  "That  he  had  received  his  Majesty's  commands 
"  to  lay  before  the  House,  Papers  relating  to  the  late  Dis- 
"  turbances  in  America ;  and  that  the  same  would  be  laid 
"  before  the  House  in  a  few  days." 

J   J  That  accordingly,  on  the  28th  o( November, 

the    Lord   Harwich    laid  before    the   House, 

copies  of  all  Letteis,  &,c.,  relating  to  the  late  Proceedings 

of  the  Colony  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  together  with  a 

list  thereof,  which  was  read  by  the  Clerk. 

That  on  the    15th  of  December,  the  House 

December  ^  5th.  i       r  ii        •  i      * 

came  to  the  lollowmg  resolutions: 
"  1 .  Resolved,  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled.  That  the  votes  and  resolutions,  and 


•Sic 


proceedings  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of  Massachu- 
setts Bay,  in  the  months  of  January  and  February  last, 
respecting  several  late  Acts  of  Parliament,  so  far  as  the 
said  votes,  resolutions,  and  proceedings,  do  import  a  denial 
of,  or  to  draw  into  question,  the  power  and  authority  of  his 
Majesty,  by  and  with  the  advice  and  consent  of  the  J>ords 
Spiritual  and  Temporal,  and  Conmions,  in  Parliament  as- 
sembled, to  make  laws  and  statutes  of  sufficient  force  and 
validity  to  bind  the  Colonies  and  People  of  America,  sub- 
jects of  tlie  Crown  of  Great  Biitain,  in  all  cases  whatsoever, 
are  illegal,  unconstitutional,  and  derogatory  of  the  rights  of 
the  Crown  and  Parliament  of  Great  Britain. 

"'2.  Resolved,  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  a7id  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled,  Tliat  the  resolution  of  the  siiid 
House  of  Representatives  of  the  Province  of  Massachu- 
setts Bay,  in  January  last,  to  write  letters  to  the  several 
Houses  of  Representatives  of  the  British  Colonies  on  the 
Continent,  desiring  them  to  join  with  the  said  Hcuse  of 
Representatives  of  the  Province  o^  Massachusetts  Bay,  in 
Petitions  which  do  deny,  or  draw  into  question  the  right  of 
Parliament  to  impose  duties  and  taxes  upon  his  Majesty's 
subjects  in  America ;  and  in  pursuance  of  the  said  resolu- 
tion, the  writing  such  letters  in  which  certain  late  Acts  of 
Parliament,  imposing  duties  and  taxes,  are  stated  to  be  in- 
fringements of  the  rights  of  his  Majesty's  subjects  of  the 
said  Province,  are  proceedings  of  a  most  unwarrantable  and 
dangerous  nature,  calculated  to  inHame  the  minds  of  his 
Majesty's  subjects  in  the  other  Colonies  ;  tending  to  create 
unlawful  coinjjinations,  repugnant  to  the  laws  of  Great 
Britain,  and  subversive  of  the  Constitution. 

"  3.  Resolved,  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled,  That  it  appears  th.at  the  town  of 
Boston,  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  has  for 
some  time  pa-n  been  in  a  state  of  great  disorder  and  con- 
fusion ;  and  that  the  peace  of  the  said  town  has  at  several 
times  been  disturb^'d  by  riots  and  tumults  of  a  dangerous 
nature,  in  which  the  officers  of  his  Majesty's  Revenue 
there  have  been  obstructed  by  acts  of  violence  in  the  exe- 
cution of  the  laws,  and  their  lives  endangered. 

"  4.  Resolved  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled.  That  it  appears  that  neither  the 
Council  of  the  said  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  nor  the 
ordinary  Civil  Magistrates,  did  exert  their  authority  for  sup- 
pressing the  said  riots  and  tumults. 

"  5.  Resolved  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled,  That  in  these  circumstances  of  the 
Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  and  of  the  town  of  Boston, 
the  preservation  of  the  public  peace,  and  tiie  due  execution 
of  the  laws  became  impracticable  without  the  aid  of  a  mili- 
tary force  to  support  and  protect  the  Civil  Magistrates,  and 
the  Officers  of  lis  Majesty's  Revenue. 

"  6.  Resolved  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled,  That  the  declarations,  resolutions, 
and  proceedings,  in  the  town  meeting  at  Boston,  on  the  14th 
of  June,  and  12th  of  September,  were  illegal  and  unconsti- 
tutional, and  calculated  to  excite  sedition  and  insurrection 
in  his  Majesty's  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay. 

"  7.  Resolved  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled,  That  the  appointment  at  the  town 
meeting,  on  the  12th  of  September,  of  a  Convention  to  be 
held  in  the  town  of  Boston,  on  the  22d  of  that  month,  to 
consist  of  Deputies  from  the  several  towns  and  districts  in 
the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  and  the  issuing  a 
precept  by  the  Selectmen  of  the  town  of  Boston,  to  each 
of  the  said  town?  and  districts  for  the  election  of  such 
Deputies,  were  jiroceedings  subversive  of  his  Majesty's 
Government,  and  evidently  manifesting  a  design  in  the  in- 
habitants of  the  said  town  of  Boston,  to  set  up  a  new  and 
unconstitutional  authority,  independent  of  the  Crown  of 
Great  Britain. 

"  S.  Resolved  by  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Temporal  in 
Parliament  assembled.  That  the  elections,  by  several  towns 
and  districts  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  of 
Deputies  to  sit  in  the  said  Convention,  and  the  meeting  of 
sucli  Convention  in  consequence  thereof,  were  daring  in- 
sults offered  to  his  Majesty's  authority,  and  audacious  usur- 
pations of  the  powers  of  Government." 

It  was  then  ordered,  "  That  an  humble  Address  be  pre- 
"  seiued  to  his  Majesty,  to  return  his  Majesty  thanks  for 
"  the  communication  which  he  has  been  pleased  to  make 
"  to  his  Parliament,  of  several  Papers  relative  to  public 


23 


KINGS  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7.  1774. 


34 


Jan.  ao,  1769. 


•'  transactions  in  his  Majesty's  Province  of  Massachusetts 
"  Bay. 

"  To  express  our  sincere  satisfaction  in  tlie  measures 
"  wiiicli  liLs  Majesty  has  pursued  for  supporting  tlie  Consti- 
"  tution,  and  inducing  a  due  obedience  to  the  authority  ol 
"  the  Legislature. 

•'  To  give  his  Majesty  the  strongest  assurances  tiiat  we 
••  will  effectually  stand  by  and  support  his  Majesty  in 
"  such  further  measures  as  may  be  found  necessary  to  main- 
"  tain  the  Civil  Magistrates  in  a  due  execution  of  the  laws 

■  witiiin  his  Majesty's  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay. 

"  And  as  we  conceive  that  nothing  can  be  more  inime- 
••  diately  necessary  either  for  the  maintenance  of  his  Ma- 
"  jesty"s  autiiority  in  the  said  Province,  or  for  the  guarding 
"  his  Majesty's  subjects  therein  from  being  furtiier  deluded 
"■  by  the  arts  of  wicked  and  designing  men,  than  to  pro- 
•'  ceed  in  the  most  speedy  and  effectual  manner  for  bring- 
"  ing  to  condign  punishment  the  chief  authors  and  insti- 
"  gators  of  the  lale  disorders,  to  beseech  his  Majesty,  that 
^  he  will  be  graciously  pleased  to  direct  liis  Majesty's 
"  Govemor  of  Massachusetts  Bay  to  take  the  most  effec- 
"  tual  methods  for  procuring  the  fullest  information  that  can 
"■  be  obtained,  touching  all  treasons  or  misprison  of  treason 
■'  committed  within  his  Government,  since  the  30th  of 

■  December  last,  and  to  transmit  the  same,  together  with 
•"  the  names  of  the  persons  who  were  most  active  in  the 
••'  commission  of  such  offences,  to  one  of  his  Majesty's 
"  principal  Secretaries  of  State,  in  order  that  his  Majesty 
■"  may  issue  a  special  commission  for  inquiring  of,  hearing, 
"  and  determining  the  said  offences  within  this  Realm, 
"  pursuant  to  the  provisions  of  the  statute  of  the  thirty-fifth 
•'  year  of  the  reign  of  King  Henry  the  Eighth,  if  Jiis 
"  Majesty  shall,  upon  receiving  the  said  information,  see 
'•'  sufficient  groiuid  for  such  a  proceeding." 

And  a  Message  was  sent  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
to  carrj'  down  the  said  Resolutions  and  Address,  and  de- 
sire their  concurrence  thereto. 

On  the  20th  January,  1769,  Lord  Harwich, 
(by  his  Majesty's  command,)  laid  before  the 
House  more  copies  of  letters  relating  to  America,  which 
were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

On  the  9tli  of  February,  the  Resolutions  and 

"^m  ■  j^djifess^  sent  to  tlie  Commons  on  the  15tli  of 
December  last,  for  their  concurrence,  were  returned  agreed 
to,  with  some  amendments,  which  were  read  and  agreed 
to,  and  notice  thereof  sent  to  the  Commons ;  and  the  said 
Address  was  ordered  to  be  presented  to  his  Majesty  by 
both  Houses. 

On  the  14th  of  February,  the  Lord  Chan- 

"""^^  cellor  reported  his  Majesty's  Answer  to  the  said 
Address,  as  follows : 

•'  My  Lords  and  Gentlemen:  The  sincere  satisfaction 
"  you  express  in  the  mea-sures  wliich  I  have  already  taken, 
■'  and  the  strong  assurances  yo\i  give  of  supporting  me  in 
"  those  which  may  be  still  necessary,  to  maintain  the  just 
"  legislative  authority,  and  the  due  execution  of  the  laws, 
"  in  my  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  give  me  great 
"  pleasure. 

"  1  shall  not  fail  to  give  those  orders  which  you  recom- 
"  niend,  as  the  most  effectual  method  of  bringing  the  authors 
"  of  the  late  unhappy  disorders  in  lliat  Province,  to  con- 
"  dign  punishment." 

Which  Address  and  Answer  were  ordered  to  be  printed. 

vidt  BwoUa.  ^^  *'°'''  "°^  appear  to  the  Committee  that 
acKi  Aiidn-w.-.  the  censure  of  the  proceedings  in  the  Province 
°Jt  "^viiiim'n^  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  and  of  the  conduct  of 
ui  frt.  mi.  ji,g  Council  and  otlier  Civil  Magistrates,  ex- 
pressed by  both  Houses  of  Parliament,  in  their  Resolutions, 
and  their  approbation  of  the  measure  of  sending  troops 
thither  to  support  and  protect  the  Magistrates,  and  theOfli- 
cers  of  the  Revenue,  produced  the  good  effect  that  mi"ht 
reasonably  have  been  hoped  for.  A  disposition  to  deny  the 
authority,  and  resist  the  laws  of  the  supreme  Legislature, 
continued  still  to  prevail,  not  only  in  Hagiiious  publications 
in  the  daily  newspapers,  but  also  in  a  variety  of  violent  and 
unwarrantable  resolutions  and  proceedings  of  those  mer- 
chants and  others,  who  had  subscribed  to  the  agreements 
for  non-importation  of  goods  from  Great  Britain. 

Meetings  of  the  Associators  were  represent- 
vide  '  Prii'.i.-a  ed  to  have  been  held,  in  as  regular  a  manner 
*^S(ioii.«nd  as  any  other  meeting  authorized  by  the  Consti' 


tution.    Committees  were  appointed  to  examine  Jk^pn^^'ng) 

the  cargoes  of  all  vessels  arnvnig  from  Great  <h™-"r-  Wjcs 
Britain;  and  regular  votes  and  resolutions  of 
censure  were  passed  in  those  meetings  upon  all  such  as 
refused  to  concur  in  those  unlawful  Associations;  their 
names  were  published  in  the  public  newspapers  as  enemies 
to  their  country  ;  and  the  mandates  and  decrees  of  those 
Conmiittees*  meet  with  a  respect  and  obedience  denied  to 
the  constitutional  authority  of  Government. 

in  some  cases  goods  imjKjrted  from  Great  Britain  were 
locked  up  in  ware-houses,  under  the  care  of  these  Com- 
mittees, in  order  to  prevent  their  being  sold  ;  and,  in  one 
or  two  instances,  they  were  i-e-shipped  to  Great  Britain. 

On  the  31st  of  'May,  1769,  the  General 
Court  met  at  the  court  house  at  Boston,  j)ur-  vi<i.'  sii"mn- 
suant  to  his  Majesty's  writs,  and  the  first  step  x^.^/^Tjlmr, 
the  Assembly  took,  before  they  proceeded  on  nee.''"' ■'"'"' 
any  other  business,  was  to  send  a  Message  to 
the  Govemor,  asserting  that  the  having  ships  in  the  harbor, 
and  troops  in  the  town  of  Boston,  was  inconsistent  with 
their  dignity  and  freedom;  and,  therefore,  that  they  had 
a  right  to  expect  that  he  would  give  orders  for  the  remo- 
val of  the  forces,  by  sea  and  land,  from  that  port,  and  from 
the  gates  of  the  city,  during  the  session  of  tlie  Assembly ; 
and,  at  the  same  time,  the  House  came  to  several  resolu- 
tions to  the  same  effect  as  the  declarations  contained  in 
their  Message  to  the  Governor. 

The  Governor  having  in  reply  to  their  Message,  acquaint- 
ed them  "  That  he  had  no  authority  over  his  Majesty's 
"  ships  in  that  port,  or  his  troops  in  that  town,  nor  could 
"  give  any  orders  for  the  removal  of  them,"  they  then 
proceeded  to  the  election  of  Counsellors,  in  which  election 
not  only  the  Lieutenant  Govemor,  and  other  officers  of 
Government  were  excluded,  but  also  several  other  gentle- 
men who  had  been  of  the  former  Council,  and  who  (the 
Governor  represents)  shewed  a  disposition  to  support  the 
King's  Government,  to  acknowledge  the  authority  of  Par- 
liament, and  to  preserve  tlie  People  from  a  Democratic 
despotism,  and  were  otherwise  distinguished  by  their  integ- 
rity and  ability. 

On  the  13th  of  June,  tlie  Assembly  sent  an  Answer  to 
the  Governor's  Message,  of  the  31st  of  May,  in  which  he 
had  told  them  that  he  had  no  authority  over  the  King's 
ships  or  troops.  In  this  Answer  they  assert  that  "  By  the 
"  principles  of  the  Constitution,  the  Governor  of  thatColo- 
"  ny  has  the  absolute  military  command ;  that  the  sending 
"  a  mihtary  force  there  to  enforce  the  execution  of  the  laws, 
"  is  inconsistent  with  the  nature  of  Government,  and  the 
"spirit  of  a  free  Constitution ;  that  the  unwillingness  of  a 
"  People  in  general,  that  a  law  should  be  executed,  was  a 
"  strong  presumption  of  its  being  an  unjust  law ;  that  it 
"  could  not  be  their  law,  as  tlie  People  must  consent  to 
"  laws  before  they  can  be  obliged,  in  conscience,  to  obey 
"  them." 

h  appears  by  a  vote  of  the  Assembly,  on  the 
8tli  of  July,  that  they  have  declared  that  all  F.xireciuiGo». 
trials  for  treason,  misprison  of  treason,  or  for  ^"'IC Kiri'rf 
any  felony  or  crime  whatever,  committed  or  ";."7fh'a°,''/mh 
done  in  that  Colony,  ought  of  riiiht  to  be  had  •'|''V  "'^'  ™- 
and  conducted  within  the  courts  of  the  Colon  v;  «'''"'"'»  '•""■e 

d,  ,  .    .  -^  '    House  nf  Hep- 

that  the  seizing  any  person  or  persons,  re-  rMcmntivn,  of 

siding  in  thsit  Colony,  suspected  of  any  crime  ""*"'•'"'''• 
whatsoever,  committed  therein,  and  sending  such  person  or 
persons  to  places  beyond  the  sea  to  be  tried,  is  highly  de- 
rogatory of  the  rights  of  British  subjects,  as  thereby  the 
inestimable  privilege  of  bcnig  tried  by  a  Jury  from  the 
vicinage,  as  well  as  tiie  liberty  of  summoning  and  produc- 
ing witnesses  on  such  trials,  v>'ill  be  taken  away  from  the 
party  accused. 

On  the  6th  of  April,  1770,  a  Bill  was  brought 
up  from  the  House  of  Commons,  to  your  Lord-  ^".Tto/^"' 
ships,  intituled,  "  An  Act  to  repeal  so  much  of 
"  an  Act,  made  in  tiie  sevenlli  year  of  his  present  Majesty's 
"  reign,  intituled,  'An  Act  for  granting  certain  Duties  in 
"  tiie  British  Colonies  and  Plantations  in  America ;  for 
"  allowing  a  drawback  of  the  duties  of  customs  upon  the 
"  exportation  from  this  Kingdom,  of  coffee  and  cocoa-nuts, 
"  of  the  produce  of  the  said  Colonies  or  Plantations ;  for 
'•  discontinuing  the  drawbacks  payable  on  china  earthen 


»Si«. 


25 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


26 


May  7th. 


"  ware,  exported  to  America ;  and  for  more  effectually 
"  preventing  the  clandestine  running  of  goods  in  the  said 
"  Colonies  and  Plantations  ; '  as  relates  to  tlie  Duties  upon 
"  glass,  red  lead,  white  lead,  painters'  colours,  paper  paste- 
"  boards,  millboard.-^,  and  scaleboards,  of  the  ])roduce  or 
"  manufacture  of  G'rent  Britain,  imported  into  any  of  his 
"  Majesty's  Colonies  in  America;  and  also  to  the  discon- 
"  tinuing  the  drawbacks  payable  on  cliina  earthen  ware, 
"  exported  to  America;  and  for  regulating  the  exportation 
"  thereof." 

Which  Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  12tli  of 
April. 
.ipriimh.  ^"  t''6  30th  of  April,  it  was  ordered  ''  That 

••  an  humble  Address  should  be  presented  to  his 
"  Majesty,  that  he  would  be  graciously  pleased  to  give 
"  directions  that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  of 
"  all  narratives  of  any  disputes  or  disturbances  which  have 
"  happened  between  his  Majesty's  troops,  stationed  in 
"  North  America,  and  the  inhabitants  of  any  of  his  Ma- 
"  jesty's  Colonies  there,  since  the  24th  day  of  June  last, 
"  received  by  the  Commissioners  of  his  Majesty's  Treasu- 
'•  ry,  and  of  his  Majesty's  Secretaries  of  State,  or  any  other 
"  public  officers,  together  with  copies  of  all  orders  and  in- 
"  structions  .sent  to  the  Governors,  Lieutenant  Governors, 
"  Deputy  Governors,  Presidents  of  the  Council  of  any  of 
"  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in  North  America,  or  to  the 
"  Commander-in-chief  of  his  Majesty's  forces,  or  any  offi- 
"  car,  civil,  or  military,  within  the  same,  relative  to  such 
'•  disputes  or  disturbances." 
Hay  4ih.  -^n*'  t'l'-it  on  the  4th  of  May,  the  Lord  Hai-- 

wich,  (by  his  Majesty's  command,)  laid  before 
the  House,  several  Papers  relating  to  the  late  Disturbances 
in  America,  pursuant  to  an  Address  to  his  Majesty,  for  that 
purpose,  on  the  30th  of  April  last,  together  with  a  list 
thereof;  wiiich  were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

The  Committee  find  that,  on  the  7th  of  May, 

the  Lord  Harwich,  laid  before  the  House,  (by 
his  Majesty's  command,)  a  Narrative  of  the  late  transac- 
tions at  Boston,  and  the  case  of  Captain  Thomas  Preston, 
of  the  twenty-ninth  Regiment  of  Foot,  which  had  been 
transmitted  to  his  Lordship,  from  the  War  Office ;  and  the 
same  were  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table. 

On  the  14th  of  May  it  was  ordered,  that 

an  humble  Address  should  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  that  he  would  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  di- 
rections, that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  of  the 
Earl  o{  Hillsborough's  letter  of  the  13th  oi  May,  1769,  to 
the  Governors  of  the  several  Colonies  of  North  America ; 
together  with  the  Speeches  of  the  Governors,  referring  to 
the  said  letter,  and  the  Answers  of  the  Assemblies  to  the 
same,  so  far  as  they  have  been  received. 

And  on  the  15th,  the  Lord  Harwich  laid 

before  the  House,  by  his  Majesty's  command, 
copies  of  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough's  letter  of  the  13th  of 
May,  1769,  to  the  Governors  of  the  several  Colonies  of 
North  America;  together  with  the  Speeclies  of  the  Govern- 
ors, referring  to  the  said  letter,  and  the  Answers  of  the 
As.semblies  to  the  same,  so  far  as  they  have  been  received  ; 
together  with  a  list  thereof;  which  were  ordered  to  lie  on 
the  table :  and  the  same  with  the  other  American  Papers 
presented  in  tiiis  Session,  were  also  ordered  to  be  taken  into 
consideration  on  Friday  next ;  and  the  Lords  summoned. 
N-o.-isfi.  The  Committee  find  by  Lieutenant  Governor 

v^mlr"  wl  °/T  Hutchinson's  letter  of  the  27th  of  March,  1770, 
»","'' i.'",*;n,'"  tl'at  when    the  troops  were  in  the  town,  the 

E.irl    of  Hillt-  .      .  c      X       r^  ..  i 

btrtugh,  iiaitd  Commissioners  ot  the  Customs  were  sensible 
'  '  '  they  could  have  no  dependence  upon  them,  for 
if  any  riot  had  happened,  no  Civil  Magistrate  that  he  knew 
would  ha\e  employed  them  in  suppressing  it ;  those  who, 
from  a  principle,  would  have  been  disposed  to  it,  refusing, 
and  giving  this  reason,  that  they  must  immediately  after 
have  left  the  country ;  and  that  just  the  same  principles 
pre\'ailed  with  respect  to  the  troops,  which  were  said  to  be 
unconstitutional,  although  established  by  an  Act  of  Parlia- 
ment, it  being  alleged  that  it  was  an  Act  which  did  not  bind 
Colonists.       , 

Lieutenant    Governor    Hutchinson,   in     his 

letter  to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  of  the  27th 

,"""■*""«';;•' ,  April,  1770,  complains,  that  he  has  never  been 

U-tli-r    lo     Karl  i  .  '  ,    .  r       i_ 

HiiMtrmghM  able  to  obtain  the  advice  or  consent  of  the 
jiMjfoy,  1770.  Council  to  any  proposal  made  for  discounte- 


May  mil. 


MttV  l.'th. 


No.  327. 
Vide    Li'-iilcii. 
tut      Govimor 


nancing  the  usurpation  of  the  powers  of  Go\-crnment  by 
the  town  of  Boston.  That  he  had  used  the  negative 
powers  given  him  by  Charter,  in  excluding  Mr.  Hancock 
from  being  Speaker  pro  tempore,  and  Mr.  Gushing  from 
the  office  of  Commissary  General,  to  which  offices  they 
had  been  elected  ;  but  adds,  that  this  was  doing  but  little, 
as  he  could  not  remove  any  of  those  who  were  actually  in 
office,  some  of  whom  were  more  inflammatory  than  any  out 
of  office;  he  further  says,  that  they  were  then  attempting 
to  compel  all  the  importers,  of  what  they  call  contraband 
goods,  to  send  them  back,  and  that  he  was  not  sure  they 
would  not  succeed ;  that  all  goods  which  they  have  not 
enumerated  are  called  contraband.  That  tea  from  Hol- 
land may  lawfully  be  sold  ;  tliat  it  is  a  high  crime  to  sell 
any  from  England.  That  Mr.  Hancock  offered  to  send 
one  or  more  of  his  ships  back,  and  to  lose  the  freight ;  that 
several  of  the  importers  pleaded  that  they  should  be  utterly 
ruined  ;  but  the  Boston  zealots  had  no  bowels,  and  gave  for 
answer,  "  That  if  a  ship  was  to  bring  in  the  plague,  nobody 
"  would  doubt  what  was  necessary  to  be  done  with  her ;  but 
"the  present  case  is  much  worse  than  that."  In  the  same 
letter  the  Lieutenant  Governor  observes,  "  That  the  Boston 
"  principles  obtain  more  and  more  in  the  remote  parts  of  the 
"  Province,  and  the  Representatives  of  seven-eighths  of  the 
"  town  appear,  in  the  present  session,  to  be  favourers  of 
"  the  non-importation  measures.  That  their  internal  dis- 
"  tresses  may,  in  a  course  of  years,  force  them  to  desist,  but 
"  that  the  distress  at  present,  and  it  may  be  for  some  time  to 
"  come,  lies  principally  upon  the  friends  to  Government, 
"  who  run  the  risk  of  importing  goods,  and  then  are  com- 
"  pelled,  by  the  ruling  power,  to  keep  them  unsold,  or  to 
"  ship  them  back ;  that  he  made  an  attempt  that  day  to 
"  prevail  upon  a  merchant  of  the  first  estate  and  character, 
"  to  induce  him  to  promote  an  Association,  but  to  no  pur- 
"  pose;  and  that  he  gave  him  for  answer,  '  that,  until  Par- 
"  liament  made  provision  for  the  punishment  of  the  con- 
"  federacies,  all  would  be  ineiFectual,  and  the  associates 
"  would  be  exposed  to  popular  rage."  He  observed  further, 
"  that  the  last  year,  when  the  King's  speech,  and  the  Ad- 
"  dressses  of  the  Lords  and  of  the  House  of  Commons  first 
"  came  to  them,  the  heads  of  the  opposition  were  struck  with 
"  terror,  and  the  seditious  newspaper  writers  laid  aside  their 
"  pens  for  five  or  six  w-eeks,  but  as  soon  as  the  apprehension 
'■  of  vigorous  measures  ceased,  their  fears  were  over,  and 
"  they  became  more  assuming  and  tyrannical  than  before, 
"  and  although  the  terror  was  not  so  great  the  present  year, 
"  yet  it  was  visible  ;  but  now,  that  they  expect  nothing  will 
"  be  done,  they  are  recovering  their  spirits,  knowing  there 
"  is  no  power  within  the  Government  to  restrain  them. 

The  resistance  to  the  custom-house  officers 
still  continued  to  manifest  itself  upon  every  oc-  i-nt"  from 
casion,in  consequence  of  which,  on  the  18th  of  vemo"'HutcT. 
May,  1770,  atideman  of  the  customs,  who  had  miZl"^^.''^ 
seized  a  small  coasting  vessel  belonging  to  Con-  ""'j^^'^"'"'- 
necticut,  and  a  few  casks  of  sugar,  for  breach  of  the  Acts  of 
Trade,  in  the  evening  was  seized,  stripped,  and  carried  about 
the  town,  three  or  four  hours,  besmeared  with  tar,  and  then 
covered  with  feathers,  and  followed  by  a  great  number  of 
disorderly  People, 

The  Committee  do  not  find  in  your  Lordship's  Journals 
of  the  years  1771  and  1772,  any  material  proceedings  rela- 
tive to  the  matter  to  them  referred. 

Though  in  the  year  1771,  things  remained 
tolerably  quiet  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  i,i,.^i°;,on'Go- 
Bay,  yet  the  disposition  to  disavow  the  authority  "™7,„  farfrf 
of  Parliament,  occasionally  broke   out  in  the  miMorough, 

IT  /-ill  1  •  Julytxh,  1771. 

House  ot  Assembly  and  town  meetings ;  ac- 
cordingly, in  an  Answer  from  the  House  of  Representatives 
to  a  Message  from  the  Governor,  on  the  5th  of  July,  1771, 
they  say,  that  "  They  know  of  no  Commissioners  of  his 
"  Majesty's  Customs,  nor  of  any  revenue  his  Majesty  has  a 
"  right  to  establish  m  North  America;  that  they  know  and 
"  feel  a  tribute  levied  and  extorted  from  those,  who,  if  they 
"  have  property,  have  a  right  to  the  absolute  disposal 
''of  it." 

At  the  same  time,  the  disposition  to  import       ko.4». 
goods  in  defiance  of  the  laws  of  Revenue  and  i.icuten«nt  go- 

■/_,  ....  .  vt'i-nor     Hutch- 

Trade,  and  to  support  such  iniquitous  practices,  in«r.  w  Eari  of 
by  insults  and  open  wolences  upon  the  officers  ^^J^^aetb, 
whose  duty  it  is  to  carry  the  said  laws  into  exe-  ""• 
cution,  broke  out  upon  many  occasions ;  and,  as  usual,  the 


27 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


23 


Magistrates  declined  stiving  their  assistance  and  support, 
though  applied  to  for  that  purpose ;  which  a]ij)cars  in  the 
case  of  Arthur  Savage,  Comptroller  of  his  Majesty's 
Customs  at  Falmouth,  who  was  forcibly  taken  out  of  his 
house  in  the  ni£;ht,  by  several  persons  disguised  and  anned 
with  pistols  and  other  dani^erous  weapons,  wlio  put  him  in 
the  utmost  danger  of  his  life,  and  not  only  ohlij^ed  him  to 
divulge  the  name  of  the  person  who  had  lodged  an  informa- 
tion, but  also  to  swear  to  the  truth  of  his  information,  de- 
claring at  the  same  lirr.e,  that,  if  ];e  disi-o^ered  whotliey 
were,  they  would  take  his  life  ;  aiul  that  upon  his  applica- 
tion to  tiie  Justices,  who  were  then  sitting,  they  declined 
the  examination  of  the  evidence  he  brougiit  to  prove  tiie 
fact. 

xo  310.  Things  remained  much  in  the  same  state  in 

"*"•  j*"/,^''//"  the  year  1772.     The  continued  ill  temper  of 
innuxii.  Mr:<,  thc  People  at  Jioston  was  maniiested  bv  tJieir 
Bttiun  c.aitiie  mstmctions  to  tiieir  Kepresentatives. 
^Mav  u(ix.  (_T|)on  the  news  of  his  Majesty's  granting  sala- 

(•^^"thJciim-  "es  to  the.Justices  of  the  Supreme  Court,  tlie 
""rtmouM'o?!^  most  inflammatory  pieces  were  published  in  the 
(.*fr  i3.i,  1772.  newspapers,  and  tlie  Selectmen  of  Boston  or- 

No.  332.  ,  1       '  •  -J  !• 

Addn-u,^  Ort«  dercd  a  meetmg  to  consider  ol  mea-iures  upon 
''  '  '  '  that  occasion ;  which  meetin!;  voted  an  Address 
to  the  Governor,  in  which  they  say,  "  That,  tlie  frechold- 
"  ers  and  other  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Boston,  legally 
"  assembled  in  Faneuil  Hall,  bog  leave  to  acquaint  his  Ex- 
"  cellency,  that  a  report  has  prevailed,  which  they  have 
"  reason  to  apprehend  is  well  grounded,  that  stipends  are 
"  affixed  to  the  offices  of  the  Judges  of  the  Superior  Court 
"  of  judicature,  &c.,  of  this  Province,  whereby  they  are  be- 
"  come  independent  of  the  grants  of  the  General  Assembly 
"  for  their  support,  conti-ary  to  the  ancient  and  invariable 
"  usage. 

"  Tiiat  this  report  has  spread  an  alarm  among  all  con- 
"  siderate  persons  who  have  heard  of  it,  in  town  and  country, 
"  being  viewed  as  tending  rapidly  to  com))lcte  the  sy.^tein 
"  of  their  slavery,  which  originated  in  the  House  oi  Com- 
"  nions  of  Great  Britain,  assuming  a  power  and  authority 
'■  to  give  and  grant  the  money?  of  the  Colonists  without 
'•  their  consent,  and  against  their  repeated  remonstrances. 
"  And  as  the  Judges  hold  their  places  during  pleasure,  this 
"  establishment  appears  big  with  fatal  evils  so  obvious,  that 
"  it  is  needless  to  trespa.ss  on  your  Excellency's  time  in 
"  mentioning  them." 

The  Town  Meeting  afterwards  appointed  a 
oav°rnur'  Couuiiittce  of  Correspondence,  to  write  circular 
2;ri''!rf'™«r°.  letters  to  all  the  towns  in  tiie  Province,  to  in- 
ZVti-nZ'iib  tl'ice  them  to  unite  in  me;isures  upon  that  occa- 
Muii"'"'r''  ihu  ®'°"'  "''''"^*'  Committee  met  on  the  2d  of  No- 
.ou-i  .nil  pro-  vcmber.  1772,  and  made  a  report,  contahiina 

Cft-dineij  (if  ihe  i  i      •  i-  ^ 

t.>wiio?B.«™,  several  resokuions  contradictory  to  the  supre- 
mj.""'"'*"''  macy  of  the  British  Legislature;  and  after 
setting  forth,  that  all  men  have  a  right  to  remain 
in  a  state  of  nature,  as  long  as  tliey  please,  they  proceed  to 
draw  a  report  upon  tlie  natural  rights  of  the  Colonists,  as 
No.M<.  .™^?'  chri<;tians,  and  .suhjects,  and  form  a  list  of 
ptinu-d   voir,  infringements  and  violations  of  their  rights:  one 

•nd      Tirocet-d-       c  ^\        r  c        i  •    i  •  "^  ^'^^ 

tnff.ofis.fr..-  Ol  tlie  Inst  ol  which  contains  an  assertion,  that 
illliiiun«"  "If  the  British  Parliament  have  assumed  the  pow- 
fu'.",rm., •','>„,:".  ers  of  legislation  for  the  Colonies  in  all  cases 
i^^'"'"'  "'"•  whatsoever,  without  obtaining  the  consent  of  the 
inhabitants,  which  is  ever  essentially  necessary 
to  the  rightful  establishment  of  such  a  le:.nslation. 

They  al.so  consider  it  as  an  infringement  of  tiieir  rights, 
that  a  number  of  new  officers,  unknown  to  the  Chaiter,  have' 
been  appointed  to  superintend  the  revenues;  whereas  tiie 
great  and  general  Court  or  Assembly  of  that  Province  had 
the  sole  right  of  appointing  all  civil  officers,  excepting  only 
such  officers,  the  election  and  rcnslitution  of  whom  isln  tl;e 
said  Charter  exjiressly  excepted,  among  whom  these  officers 
are  not  included. 

They  likewise  complain  of  it  as  a  giievance,  that  his 
Majesty  has  been  jileased  to  apply  £  1 500  sterling,  annually, 
out  of  the  American  revenue,  ior  the  support  of  the  Go- 
vernment of  this  Province,  independent  of  tlie  As-jembly  ; 
and  th;it  the  Judges  of  the  Superior  Court,  as  also  the 
King's  Attorney  and  Solicitor  General,  are  to  receive  their 
support  from,  wjiat  they  call,  tliis  grevious  tribute  ;  which 
tliey  say,  will,  if  acc(ira])!ished,  complete  their  slavery. 

Six  hundred  copies  uf  ibis  report  were  circulated  in  the 


towns  of  the  Province,  with  a  pathetic  letter  addressed  to 
the  inliabitants,  who  are  called  u];on  not  to  doze  any 
longer,  or  sit  supinely  in  inditference,  whilst  the  iron  hand 
of  oi)|)ressioii  is  daily  tearing  the  choicest  Ihiits  from  the 
fair  tree  of  liberty. 

On  the  (Jtli  of  May  a  Message  was  brought 
from  the  House  of  Commons  to  your  Lord-  'J™,''""!'-;,  "''' 
shi]!S,  with  a  Bill,  intituled,  "  An  act  to  allow  a 
"  draw  back  of  the  duties  of  Customs  on  the  exportation  of 
"  Tea  to  any  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies  or  Plantations  in 
"  America ;  to  increase  the  deposit  on  Bohea  tea  to  be  sold 
"  at  the  East  Lirlia  Company's  sales  ;  and  to  empower  the 
"  Commissioners  of  the  Treasury  to  grant  licences  to  the 
"  East  In  Ha  Company  to  export  tea,  duty  free;"  which 
Bill  received  the  Royal  assent  on  the  10th  o{  May. 

It  appears  to  the  Committee  in  the  Answer       N0.339. 
of  the  Council   to  the  Governor's  Speech,  at  i wil  ,"c;l!',* 
the  opening  <^i  the  session,  that  t!;ey  declare  tr,\TmV''i°m- 
"  Thev  are  of  opinion  that  tlie  Parliament  can-  ;•""•■'  >»>■«■■<* 

not,  constitutionally,  levy  taxes,  in  any  form,  >'»«. 
"  on  his  M;ije3ty's  subjects  in  that  Province." 

And  the  House  of  Kepresentative  upon  the  „  '•'»••';"■ 

11  1-^1  .  .  Hnnv   lif  Iti-p. 

same  occas-ion.  declare,  that  11  there  have  been  ■■  "•"miiv.-i  »n- 
in  any  late  instances  a  submission  to  Acts  of  »'»'•  sp..ih. 
Parliament,  it  has  been,  in  their  opinion,  rather  ""'  ^'"''•'^'^• 
from  inconsidenition,  or  a  reluctance  at  the  idea  of  contend- 
ing witii  the  Parent  State,  then  from  a  conviction  or 
acknowledgment  of  the  supreme  legislative  authority  of 
Parliament. 

The  Committee  of  Corresnondence  appear  ,.  '•■''  ^■'■ 
to  iiave  used  tlieir  utmost  endeavours  to  work  "••  '""i  Gov. 
up  the  minds  of  the  People,  not  only  for  their  K«i'i'''.!r''/Mr". 
own,  but  also  the  Southern  Governments,  to  ]vi'"'''in3'.'iith 
l)revent  the  importation  of  Te;is  from  the  East  j^'elalj^^ms"*^*: 
India  Company,  and  accordingly  on  the  3d  of 
November,  1773,  a  mob  of  about  five  hundred  persons, 
committed  several  outrageous  acts  of  violence,  ai^ainst  the 
persons  to  whom  it  was  expected  the  Tea  in  question  would 
be  consigned,  insisting  tiiat  they  should  engage  and  pro- 
mise not  to  receive  or  sell  it ;  that  if  they  did,  they  would 
be  voted  enemies  to  their  country,  and  must  expect  to  be 
treated  as  such  hereafter.  They  tiien  forced  open  tiie  doors 
of  the  ware-houses  of  Mr.  Clark,  and  tore  them  off  the 
liinges,  and  entered  with  great  violence,  attempting  to  force 
their  way  up  to  tlie  counting-house,  but  were  driven  back 
by  the  persons  who  were  in  it. 

A  Committee  then  of  the  freeholders  and   „  N"-303. 

Cnpv  ttl  a  *(»le 

Other    mhabitants,  attended    Mes.srs.    Thomas  '•'  y '"V 
and  Elisha  Hutchinson,  supposed  to  be  two  of  Km.Nav.  isiii, 
the  consignees,  and  requested  them  to  resign    "xosrs. 
their  appointment,    and   upon    their   refusing,  pJiM,','!  il.'T*!^ 
voted  tiieir  answer    unsatisfactory.     Governor  'is;'',7"3i''inHi 
Hutchinson    did    every    thinij   in    his  power,  »■;'! '"(*,''*/'"'■ 

.  1  rf-,  .1      *i.  1  c/iinttm*  I.  lif  r 

witiiout  the  Council,  for  the  preservation    of  <" -O"- 2.  i'm. 

the  peace  and  good  order  of  the  town,   and  Extmi.faiet- 

thought  that  if  lie  had  the  aid  the  Council  might  h'„>JI"!',ok  "w 

have   given,    his  endeavors  would   have  been  nZlthfn'c's"^', 

more  effiictual.  '"'••'■ '""' ''"' 

On  the  7th  November,  1773,  a  lar<;e  number  cup'';  f.tl;  u^e r 

of  People  beset  the  house  of  Mr.  Ilutchinson,  fj""  ooxmar 

I  r      ,•  I  •  I  II  --'    nt'tr/Niisun    to 

but  not  nndiiig  iiiin  at  liome,  proceeded  to  Mr.  k-h  "f  onn- 
Clark^s,  another  of  tl'e  consignees,  where  they  fl»«6/,',  su'wrr. 
committed  great  disorders;  broke  the  glasses   ''''■""■•.'"".'<<' 


and  frames  of  the  windows,  and  did  considera-  '"'" '^ 


a  eitpy  uf    lh« 
Piliiiiiii    of 
Ki./.niil   Clark 

bledamaire.     After  this  riot  the  Govern*  r  iin-  =""isoi..ii«i>- 

.  ~  """      rnuruit, 

mediately  summoned  a  Council,  and  laid  before  ""'  ^.'P/"""' 

,  ,  ■'  .  .  '  ,      .  anil  tlisha  llul- 

tiiein  the  necessity  of  some  measures  being  r/..n.i)ii,  ai,d  of 
taken;  but  tiie  Council  declined  advising;  or  If  !\'i^".,uuSi 
directing  any  measures  for  landing  the  Tea ;  ''"'""'"'"• 
suggesiini,  that  tliey  then  would  of  course  advise*  to  a 
measure  for  procuring  the  payment  of  the  duty,  and  there- 
fore be  advising  to  a  measure  inconsistent  with  the  declared 
sentiment  of  both  Houses  in  the  last  winter  session  of  the 
General  Court,  which  they  apprehend  to  be  altogether 
inexpedient  and  improper. 

After  tlie  arrival  of  a  sliip  loaded  with  Tea,  copy"t-aT»P" 
a  meeting  of  the  Peoide  o(  Boston,  and  the  v'"'uku,i  B»f 

'    ,  ,  .  lit  itiii.vnua  Orft 

neighbouring  towns,  was  held,  on  the  29th  of  i»>  r73,iiiG«Y. 
November,  and  continued,  by  adjournment,  till  1.  i'uTofJdr)«. 
next  day,  when  a  motion  was  made  and  agreed 
•Sic. 


J 


29 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


30 


to,  new,,  con.,  that  the  Tea  should  be  not  only  sent  back, 
but  that  no  duty  should  be  paid  tiiereon. 

It  was  also  voted,  ncm.  con.,  that  Mr.  Rotch,  owner  of 
the  vessel,  ;uid  Captain  Hall,  the  master  of  tiie  ship,  at 
their  per.l,  should  not  suffer  any  of  the  Tea  to  be  landed ; 
it  was  also  vottd,  that  Gov.  liuUhinsons  conduct,  in 
requesting  the  Justices  of  the  Peace  to  meet  to  suppress 
all  riots  and  unlawful  assemblies,  carried  a  designed  reflec- 
tion upon  the  People  there  met,  and  was  solely  calculated 
to  serve  the  views  of  "Adinini-stnition.  They  afterwards 
voted  that  the  Tea  brought  by  Captain  Hall,  should  be 
returned,  by  Mr.  Rotch,  to  England,  in  tl.e  same  bottom 
in  which  it  came;  it  was  also  voted,  nam.  con.,  that  six 
persons  should  be  appointed  to  give  due  notice  to  the  towns 
in  the  country,  when  they  should  be  required  so  to  do  upon 
any  iinjjortaiu  occasion. 

They  also  resolved,  that  if  any  person  or  persons  should 
hereafter  import  any  Tea  from  Great  Biitain,  or  if  any 
master  or  masters  of  any  vessel  or  vessels  in  Great  Britain, 
should  take  the  s.tnie  en  board  to  be  imported  to  that 
place,  until  the  said  unrighteous  Act  should  be  repealed,  he 
or  they  shoald  he  deemed  by  that  body  an  enemy  to  his 
country,  and  tiiat  t!)ey  would  prevent  the  landing  and  sale 
of  the  same,  and  the  payment  of  any  duty  thereon,  and 
that  they  would  efl'ect  the  return  thereof  to  the  place  from 
whence  it  came. 

They  also  resolved  that  these  their  votes  be  printed,  and 
sent  to  England,  and  all  the  sea  ports  in  the  Province. 
Befove  they  separated  they  voted  that  their  brethren  in 
the  country  should  be  desired  to  give  their  assistance  upon 
the  first  notice  that  should  be  given. 
'  \'o.  ,109.  After  tl:e  dissolution  of  this  Assembly  of  the 

firrc/.v.'/'L"  People,  what  is  called  the  Committee  of  Cor- 
<•*'"''"""'■-»;'  respondence,  called  in  Committees  of  other 
Biiitii.  Dec.  towns,  or  other  persons  to  jom  with  them,  kept 
up  a  mihtary  watch  and  guard  eveiy  night,  to 
prevent  the  landing  any  Teas,  and  appeared  to  be  the 
Execut'oners  of  the  resolves  and  orders  passed  at  the 
aforesaid  Assembly. 

The  consignees  having  retired  to  the  Castle,  the  owner 
of  the  first  ship  that  arrived  was  the  principal  person  ap- 
plied to,  and  he  was  sent  for  repeatedly  by  these  Commit- 
tees, and  was  frequently  required  to  send  back  the  ship 
with  the  Teas;  he  pleaded,  "That  he  could  not  get  a 
"  clearance  at  the  custom-house,  nor  a  pass  for  the  Castle  ; 
"  and  that  if  he  should  be  able  to  get  his  ship  out  of  the 
"  harbour,  bDth  sliip  and  cargo  would  be  forfeited  in  every 
"  part  of  the  King's  dominions."  Tliis  was  not  thouglit 
satisfactory,  and  tlie  next  morning  another  Assembly  of  the 
People  met  and  chose  a  Moderator.  At  this  meeting  it 
was  determined,  that  Mr.  Rotch,  the  owner  of  the  ship, 
should  demand  at  the  custom-house,  a  clearance  of  the 
Teas  for  England,  which  was  done  the  15th,  when  the 
Collector  and  Conq)troller  refused  to  grant  it. 

v„.  310.  He  tlien    was  obliged  to  demand  a  permit 

fo'.Ttlm''//;;;.  '"'■om  tl'e  Naval  Office  to  pass  the  Castle  ;  after- 
"''/jn«",S,l  ^^^''''^  ^^  "'^s  sent  to  the  Governor  to  apply  to 
mi"m'''  '  ''""  ''"'^  *'"'  permit,  who  soon  satisfied  him  that 
no  permit  could  be  granted  until  the  vessel  was 
regularly  cleared.  He  returned  to  town  that  evening  and 
reported  this  answer  to  the' meeting.  Lmnediately  where- 
upon nunibers  of  the  People  cried  out  a  mob!  a  mob  I  left 
the  house,  repaired  to  t'le  wharfs  where  tliree  of  the  vessels 
lay  aground,  havin;;  on  board  three  hundred  and  forty 
chests  of  Tea,  and  in  two  hours  t'me  it  was  totally  de- 
stroyed. A  sufficient  number  of  People  for  doing  the  work 
were  disguised,  and  these  were  surrounded  by  numbers,  as 
svell  of  tiie  inhabitants  of  lioslon,  as  of  other  towns. 

xo.59:.  The  Committee  observe,  tJiat  many  persons 

ralPv.  "h^g";  of  consideration  in  tl;e  town  oi  Boston  took  the 
Mw'.'r^ov.  Ie;id  in  the  proceedings  of  this  meeting,  for 
4iii,  1773.  whose   names  they   beg   leave  to  refer   your 

Lordships  to  the  papers  themselves. 

j...i™ii  ^(h  On  tlie  4th  of  March,  1774,  tiie   Earl  of 

March.ai*.  Drtrt;noM</t  acquainted  the  House,  "That  his 
"  Majesty  had  given  directions  that  the  several  Papers 
"  received  from  America,  relating  to  the  Disturbances  tlieie, 
"  with  regard  to  the  Impojtation  of  Tea,  should  be  laid 
"  before  the  House ;  and  that  the  same  would  be  delivered 
"  on  Monday  next." 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth  acquainted  the  House  "  That 


"  he  had  a  Message  from  his  Majesty,  under  March,  nik, 
"  his   Royal  sign  manual,  which  his  Majesty  '"*• 
"  had  commanded  him  to  deliver  to  this  House. 

And  the  same  was  read  by  the  Lord  Chancellor,  and  b 
as  follows ;  (videlicet :) 

"  GEORGE  R. 

His  Majesty,  upon  infomiation  of  the  unwarrantable 
practices  which  h.ave  been  lately  concerted  and  carried  on 
in  Noith  America,  and  part;culai,ly  of  the  violent  and 
outrageous  proceedings  at  the  town  and  port  oi Boston,  in 
the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  with  a  view  to  ol)- 
structing  the  commerce  of  this  Kingdom,  and  upon  grounds 
and  pretences  immediately  subveisive  of  tiie  Constitution 
thereof,  hath  thought  fit  to  lay  tlie  whole  matter  before 
his  two  Houses  of  Parliament,  fully  confiding  as  well  in 
their  zeal  for  the  maintenance  of  his  Majesty's  authority,  as 
in  their  attachment  to  tlie  common  interest  and  welfare  of 
all  ills  Dominions,  that  they  will  not  only  enable  his  Majesty 
effectually  to  take  such  measures  as  may  be  most  likely  to 
put  an  immediate  step  to  the  present  disorders,  but  will 
also  lake  into  their  most  serious  consideration  what  farther 
regulations  and  permanent  provisions  may  be  necessary,  to 
be  established  for  better  securing  the  execution  of  the  laws, 
and  the  just  dependence  of  the  Colonies  upon  the  Crown 
and  Parliament  of  Great  Britain.  G.  R." 

The  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  also,  (by  his  Majesty's  com- 
mand,) laid  before  the  House,  copies  of  all  letters,  &,c., 
received  from  North  America,  relating  to  the  Disturbances 
there  with  regard  to  the  Importation  of  Tea,  with  a  list 
thereof. 

It  was  ordered,  that  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to 
bis  Majesty,  "  To  return  his  Majesty  the  thanks  of  this 
"  House  for  his  Majesty's  gracious  Message,  and  for  the 
"  communication  his  Majesty  hath  been  graciously  pleased 
"  to  make  to  this  house  of  the  several  Papers  relative  to 
"  the  present  state  of  some  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in 
"  North  America. 

"  To  assure  his  Majesty,  that  this  House,  truly  sensible 
"  that  tlie  peace  and  good  Government  of  the  Colonies, 
"  and  the  prevent"ng  any  obstructions  there  to  the  com- 
"  merce  of  this  Kingdom,  are  objects  of  their  most  serious 
"  attention,  will  enter  upon  the  consideration  of  these  Pa- 
"  pers  with  an  earnest  desire  to  "make  such  provisions  as, 
"  upon  mature  deliberation,  shall  appear  necessary  and 
"  expedient  for  securing  the  just  dependence  of  the  said 
"  Colonies  upon  the  Crown  and  Parliament  of  Great 
"  Britain,  and  for  enforcing  a  due  obedience  to  the  laws 
"  of  this  Kingdom  throughout  all  his  Majesty's  domin- 
"  ions." 

And  the  said  Papers  and  his  Majesty's  most  gracious 
Speech  were  likewi'^e  ordered  to  be  taken  into  consideration 
on  Thursday  sevennight,  and  the  Lords  summoned. 

On  the  11th  of  March,  the  Earl  of  Dart-  j^^^^^„^ 
mouth  (by  his  Majesty's  command)  laid  before 
the  house  more  Papers  from  America,  relating  to  the  Dis- 
turbances there  with  regard  to  the  Importation  of  Tea,  to- 
gether with  a  list  thereof;  and  the  same  was  read,  and 
ordered  to  lie  on  the  table  ;  and  to  be  taken  into  conside- 
ration on  Thursday  next. 

On  the  -^Gth  March,  a  Message  was  brought  ^ 

from  the  House  of  Commons,  with  a  Bill  intitu- 
led, "  An  act  to  discontinue,  in  such  manner,  and  for  such 
"  time,  as  are  therein  mentioned,  the  landing  and  discharg- 
"  ing,  lading  or  shipping,  of  goods,  wares,  and  merchan- 
"  disc,  at  the  town  and  within  the  hajbour  of  Boston,  in  the 
"  Province  of  jMassachiisetts  Bay,  in  North  America. 

On  the  28th  of  March,  a  Petition  of  Mr.  „  ^„,.^ 
i:iayer,  and  others,  natives  of  Amencaywns  pre- 
sented and  read,  praying  the  said  Bill  may  not  pass  into  a 
law;  which -was  ordered  to  lie  on  the  table.  Then  the 
House  took  into  consideration  the  several  Papers  in  his 
Majesty's  most  gracious  Message ;  and  the  said  Bill  was 
read  a  second  time  and  committed. 

On  the  :30th  of  March,  a  Petition  of  fHlliam 
Bollan,  Esq.,  Agent  for  the  Council  ol  tlie 
Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  was  presented  to  the  House 
and  read  ;  and  he  was  called  in,  and  heard  at  the  bar;  and 
being  vvithdrav.n,  the  said  Bill  was  read  a  third  time  and 
passed  ncm.  diss. ;  and  receiv<?d  the  Royal  assent  on  thei 
foUpwing  day. 


31 


KINGS  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


32 


»,  ^.  It  ap-nears  to  the  Cominittee,  that  on  the 

LfitrrrroroGo-  aSlh  of  Jdmuinj  a  great  lumibcr  ot  rioters  in  tne 
]^MVMvC  town  of  Boston,  committed  a  most  inluiman 
w^rMih  act  of  violence  upon  the  person  of  Jolm  Mal- 
jaHuan.  1774.  ^.^Ij^  g  preventive  officer  for  the  port  of  Fal- 
mouth, in  Casto  Bay,  who  imd  lately  seized  a  vessel  in 
that  port  for  want  of  a  register;  no  complaint  of  irregulari- 
ty was  made  against  him,  but  it  was  thought  proper  by  the 
above  rioteis  to  punisli  him  by  tarring  and  feathering  hiin, 
(but  whhout  stripping  him.)  and  carrying'  him  about  in  deri- 
sion. This  unfortunate  man  having  afterwiu-ds  been  fre- 
quently hooted  at  in  the  streets,  was  provoked  on  the  '25th, 
by  a  tradesman,  who,  he  alleged,  had  sevei-al  times  before 
affronted  him,  to  strike  him  witii  his  cane  ;  in  consequence 
of  which  a  warrant  was  issued  against  him,  but  the  con- 
stable not  being  able  to  find  him,  a  mob  gatliered  about 
his  house  in  the  evening,  and  having  broke  his  windows,  he 
pushed  through  the  broken  window  with  his  sword,  and 
gave  a  slight  scratch  to  one  of  the  assailants ;  soon  after 
which  the  mob  entered  his  house,  lowered  him  by  a  rope 
from  an  upper  chamber  into  a  cart,  tore  his  clothes  off, 
tarred  his  head  and  body,  feathered  him,  and  dragged  him 
through  the  main  street  into  King  Street,  from  thence  to 
Liberty  Tree,  and  from  thence  to^TAe  Neck,  as  far  as  the 
gallows,  where  they  whipt  him,  beat  him  with  sticks,  and 
threatened  to  hang  him.  Having  kept  him  under  the  gal- 
lows above  an  hour,  tliey  carried  him  back  in  the  same 
manner,  to  the  extremity  of  the  north  end  of  the  town,  and 
returned  him  to  his  own  house,  so  benumbed  by  the  cold, 
having  been  naked  near  four  hours,  and  so  bruised,  that  his 
life  was  despaired  of.  It  appears  that  none  but  the  lowest 
class  of  the  people  were  suspected  of  having  been  concerned 
in  it ;  and  that  Mr.  Malcolm  having  for  some  time  before 
been  threatened  by  the  populace  with  revenge  for  his  free 
and  open  declarations  against  the  late  proceedings,  had  oc- 
casionally indiscreetly  given  them  provocation. 

The  House  of  Representatives  of  Massachu- 
ci^mor'  sett's  Bay,  on  the  1st  o(  February,  required  the 
SfJf;"n„"  Chief  Justice  Oliver,  and  the  four  Judges  of 
fti^arf  u°h',  l'>e  Superior  Court  to  declare,  whether  they 
ItesVir^."''  ™'  "Of Id  receive  the  grants  of  Assembly  for  their 
salaries,  or  accept  their  support  from  the  Crown, 
and  were  answered  by  the  four  Judges,  (they  being  fearful 
of  making  themselves  objects  of  popular  resentment,  one  of 
their  number  having  been  previously  brought  over  to  that 
consent,)  "  that  they  would  receive  their  salaries  fi:om  the 
"  Province  ;"  but  by  the  Chief  Justice,  "  that  he  would 

N0.34J.  "continue  to  accept  his  support  from  the 
I^mtraDce^rf  "  Crown."  On  the  1 1th  of  February,  they  re- 
uie  HouK  of  monstrated  to  the  Governor,  "  That  the  .said 
of  Mmtachu-  "  Chiel  Justice  1  eter  Oliver,  havmg  received 
•Eainu  th«  "  his  Salary  and  reward  out  of  the  revenue  un- 
"  justly  and  unconstitutionally  levied  and  ex- 
"  torted  from  the  American  Colonies,  and  being  determined 
"  to  continue  to  receive  it,  contrary  to  the  known  sense 
"  of  the  body  of  the  People  of  the  Province,  had  thereby 
"  proved  himself  an  enemy  to  its  Constitution,  placed 
"  himself  under  an  undue  bias,  and  rendered  hhiiself  dis- 
"  qualified  to  hold  his  office  any  longer."  And  not  having 
procured  his  removal  from  the  Governor  in  consequence  of 

xo.343  '''^"^  remonstrance,  they  passed  a  vote  to 
Copy  of »  vote  adjoum  the  Superior  Court,  which,  by  law,  is 

of  the  Coiincil     ^      ,       ,      ,  ,  ,'        .  ,-   ,        y  »i   i  "^    ,        ^,,  . 

and  Ho.m-  of  to  bc  held  on  the  1.5th  ol  I'ebrtwry,  to  the  2-2d 
Ft^rm"y''ui",  of  that  month,  to  which  the  Governor  refused 
'"*•  his  assent,  and  complains  that  he  now  considers 

himself  as  acting  altogetiicr  on  the  defensive,  avoiding  his 
consent  where  he  cannot  justify  it,  destitute  of  any  aid  from 
any  part  of  the  Legislature  or  Executive  Powers  of  Govern- 
ment in  maintaining  order,  when  the  breach  of  it  is  caused, 
or  pretended  to  be  caused  by  such  Acts  of  Parliament,  or 
such  exercise  of  his  Majesty's  authority,  as  the  People  are 
taught  by  their  leaders  to  call  grievances. 

Which  Report  being  read  by  the  Clerk, 

Ordered,  that  the  said  Report  be  printed.* 

•m  the  SprinfT  of  1774,  I  Brit  out  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  IzanI,  to  make 
a  lour  of  France  ami  Italt/ :  but  provions  to  my  jroinf;,  I  drew  up  a 
pierc  pntitli^l  "  A  Truo  Stitc  of  the  Proccodinirg  in  the  Province  of 
.VantachuKtf  Bay,"  which  h  is  been  attributed  to  Dr.  Fianklin,  be. 
Ciuisa  it  was  left  wit)i  him,  as  agent,  to  hive  it  printed.  The  purpose 
oi  It  w.ns  to  remove  the  unjust  iind  injuriouH  impresi-ions  made  by  a 
Ruport  of  a  C'ommittae  of  the  House  »f  Lorde,  on  the  same  aubicct. — 
Arthur  Lee,  Vol.  I,  p.  262. 


HOUSE  OF  COMMONS. 
March  1th,  1774. 
The  Lord  North  acquainted  the  House,  that  he  had  a 
Message  from  his  Majesty  to  this  House,  signed  by  his 
Majesty ;  and  he  presented  the  same  to  the  House ;  and 
it  was  read  by  Mr.  Speaker,  (all  the  members  of  the  House 
being  uncovered,)  and  is  as  iollowetli,  viz  : 

GEORGE  R. 

His  Majesty,  upon  information  of  the  unwanantable 
practices  whicli  have  been  lately  concerted  and  carried  on 
in  North  America,  and  particularly  of  the  violent  and  out- 
rageous proceedings  at  the  town  of  Boston,  in  the  Province 
of  Mussachusctis  Bay,  with  a  view  of  obstructing  the  com- 
merce of  this  Kingdom,  and  upon  grounds  and  jiretences 
immediately  subversive  of  the  constitution  thereof,  have 
thought  fit  to  lay  the  whole  matter  before  his  two  Houses 
of  Parliament,  fullv  confiding  as  well  in  their  zeal  for  the 
maintenance  of  his  Majesty's  authority,  as  in  their  attach- 
ment to  the  common  interest  and  welfare  of  all  his  Domin- 
ions, that  they  will  not  only  enable  his  Majesty  effectually 
to  take  such  measures  as  may  be  most  likely  to  put  an 
immediate  stop  to  the  present  disorders,  but  will  also  take 
into  their  most  serious  consideration  what  further  regulations 
and  permanent  provisions  may  be  necessary  to  be  esta- 
blished, for  better  securing  the  execution  of  the  laws,  and 
the  just  dependence  of  the  Colonies  upon  tlie  Crown  and 
Parliament  of  Great  Britain.  G.  R. 

The  Lord  North  presented  (o  the  House,  by  his  Majes- 
ty's command,  copies  of  the  same  Papers  that  were  this  day 
communicated  to  the  House  of  Lords.     [See  folio  5-10.) 

Mr.  Rice  then  rose,  and  after  remarking  on  the  very- 
critical  situation  of  the  whole  Continent  of  North  America, 
and  enlarging  on  the  imminent  necessity  there  was  for  vin- 
dicating the  controlling  right  of  the  British  Legislature 
over  the  Colonies,*  moved,  "  Tliat  an  humble  Address  be 
"  presented  to  his  Majesty,  to  return  his  Majesty  the  thanks 
"  of  this  House,  for  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message, 
"  and  for  the  communication  his  Majesty  hath  been  gra- 
"  ciously  pleased  to  make  to  this  House,  of  the  several 
"  Papers  relative  to  the  present  state  of  some  of  his  Ma- 
"  jesty's  Colonies  in  North  America. 

"To  assure  his  Majesty,  that  this  House  will,  without 
"  delay,  proceed  to  take  into  their  most  serious  considera- 
"  tion  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message,  together  with 
"  the  Papers  accompanyiug  the  same  ;  and  will  not  fail  to 
"  exert  every  means  in  their  power,  in  effectually  providing 
"  for  objects  so  important  to  the  general  welfare,  as  main- 
"  taining  the  due  execution  of  the  laws,  and  securing  the 
"just  dependence  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies  upon  the 
''  Crown  ;ind  Parliament  of  Great  Britain." 

*  Tlie  presentment  of  tlie  Papers  was  accompanied  with  a  comment 
upon  them,  and  ])articularly  tlioso  that  related  to  the  transactions  al 
Boston,  in  wliich  the  conduct  of  the  Governor  was  described  and  ap. 
plauiled  ;  and  that  of  the  prevailing  faction  represented  in  the  most 
atrocious  lifrht.  It  was  said  that  he  had  taken  every  measure  which 
prudence  could  suggest,  or  good  policy  justify,  for  the  security  of  the 
East  India  Company's  projierty,  the  safety  of  the  consignees,  and  the 
|)resinving  of  order  and  quiet  in  the  town.  Evi-ry  civil  precaution  to 
prevent  the  mischief  that  followed  had  been  usid  in  vain.  His  Ma- 
jesty's Council,  the  Militia,  and  the  corps  of  Cadets,  had  been  all 
separately  applied  to,  for  their  assistance  in  the  preservation  of  the 
public  peace,  and  the  support  of  the  laws,  but  all  without  eff.'ct:  they 
refused  or  declined  doing  their  duty.  The  Shfiriff  read  a  Proclama- 
tion to  the  faction,  at  their  town  meeting,  by  which  they  were  com. 
inanded  to  break  up  their  Assembly ;  but  tile  Proclamation  was  treated 
with  the  greatest  contempt,  and  the  Sheriff  insulted  in  the  grossest 
manner. 

That  he  hail  it  undouhtedlj'  in  his  power,  by  calling  in  the  assis- 
tance of  tlie  naval  force  which  was  in  the  harbor,  to  have  prevented 
the  destruction  of  the  Tea;  but  that  as  the  leading  men  in  Boston  had 
always  made  great  compl  tints  of  the  interposition  of  the  army  and 
navy,  and  charged  all  disturbances  of  everj'  sort  to  their  account,  he 
witli  great  prudence  and  temperance,  determined  from  the  beginning 
to  decline  a  measure  which  would  have  been  so  irrit  iting  to  the  minds 
of  the  People ;  and  might  well  have  hoped,  that  by  this  confidence  in 
their  conduct,  and  trust  reposed  in  the  civil  power,  he  should  have 
calmed  their  turbulence,  and  preserved  the  public  tranquillity. 

Thus,  said  the  Ministers,  the  People  of  Boston  were  fairly  tried. — 
They  were  left  to  their  own  conduct,  and  to  the  exercise  of  their        ^^ 
judgments,  and  the  result  has  given  the  lie  to  all  their  former  profes.        ^B 
sions.     Tliey  are  now  without  an  excuse,  and  all  the  powers  of  Go.       '^m 
vemnicnt  in  that  Province,  are  found  insufficient  to  prevent  the  most 
violent  outrages.     The  loyal  and  peaceable  People  of  a  mercantile 
town,  (as  th  y  aff'ctto  bo  peculiarly  considered,)  have  given  a  notable 
proof  to  the  world  of  llieir  justice,  moderation,  loyalty,  and  affection, 
for  the  Mother  Country,  by  wantonly  committing  to  the  waves  a  valu. 
able  commoility,  the  propurty  of  another  loyal  mercantile  body  of  sub- 
jects,  without  the  pretence  of  necessity,  even  supposing  that  their 
opposition  to  the  payment  of  the  duties  could  justify  such  a  plea;  as 


KING'S  MESSAGE,  MARCH  7,  1774. 


84 


Lord  Clare  said,  he  agreed  with  the  honorable  gentle- 
man, and  hoped  he  should  find  this  measure  carried  through 
with  unanimity  ;  he  should  therefore  second  the  motion. 

Mr.  DowdeswclL  1  would  be  very  far  from  offering 
any  thing  on  the  present  occasion,  which  might  wear  the 
most  distant  appearance  of  opposition,  or  a  desire  to  im- 
pede measures  of  such  high  consideration.  Nevertheless, 
I  cannot  consent  to  give  my  voice,  by  any  means,  lor  what 
I  am  convinced  in  my  soul  is  wrong ;  and  though  1  do  not 
mean  to  divide  the  House  on  any  particular  opinion  I  may 
entertain  on  the  subject,  1  wish  lo  have  it  understood,  that 
I  do  not  approve  of  the  present  hasty,  ill-digested  mode  of 
proceeding. 

Governor  Pownall.  I  think  the  motion  for  an  Address 
extremely  proper,  as  it  can  mean  no  mere  than  to  return 
thanks  to  his  Majesty  for  the  present  communication. 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke  then  n)oved,  that  the  entries  in  the 
Journal  of  the  House,  of  the  8th  day  of  iSovcmLcr,  17G8, 
of  so  much  of  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Speech  to  both 
Houses  of  Parliament,  and  tiie  Address  of  this  House 
thereupon,  as  relates  to  the  state  of  his  Majesty's  Govern- 
ment in  North  America,  might  be  read  : 

And  the  same  was  read  accordingly. 

Mr.  Burke  also  moved,  that  the  entry  in  the  Journal  of 
the  House,  of  the  9th  day  of  May,  1769,  of  so  nmch  of 
his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Speech  to  both  Houses  of  Par- 
liament, as  relates  to  the  state  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies 
in  North  America,  might  be  read  : 

And  the  same  was  read  accordingly. 

Mr.  Burke  also  moved,  that  the  entries  in  the  Journal 
of  the  House,  of  the  9th  day  of  January,  1770,  of  so 
much  of  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Speech  to  both  Houses 
of  Parliament,  and  the  Address  of  this  House  thereupon, 
as  relates  to  the  state  of  his  Majesty's  Government  in 
North  America,  might  be  read  : 

And  the  same  was  read  accordingly. 

Mr.  Burke  also  moved,  that  the  entries  in  the  Journals 
of  the  House,  of  the  13th  day  of  November,  1770,  of  so 
much  of  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Speech  to  both  Houses 
of  Parliament,  and  the  Address  of  this  House  thereupon, 
as  relates  to  the  stale  of  his  Majesty's  Colonies  in  Ameri- 
ca, might  be  read  : 

And  the  same  was  read  accordingly. 

He  next  desired  the  Clerk  to  search  for  the  supposed 
Resolutions  that  were  entered  into  by  the  House,  in  obe- 
dience and  conformity  to  tliis  communication  from  the 
Throne ;  and  none  being  to  be  found,  he  resumed  his 
speech  :  Sir,  (addressing  himself  to  the  Clerk,)  1  am  tho- 
roughly satisfied  of  your  integrity  and  assiduity  in  the  dis- 
charge of  the  station  you  now  fill ;  but  however  high  you 

they  had  nothing  to  do  but  to  adhero  to  their  own  Resolutions,  of  non- 
consumption,  effjctually  to  evade  the  revenue  liiws. 

It  was  concluded  upon  tlie  whob,  that  by  an  impartial  review  of 
the  Papers  now  before  them,  it  would  manifestly  appear,  that  nothing 
could  be  done,  by  eithi^r  civil,  military,  or  naval  offic -rs,  to  effjctuate 
the  re. -establishment  of  tranquillity  and  order  in  that  Province,  with, 
out  additional  Parliamentary  powers  to  give  efficacy  to  th:;ir  proceed, 
ings.  That  no  parson  employxl  by  Government,  could  in  any  act, 
however  common  or  ligal,  fulfil  the  duti?8  of  his  office  or  station, 
without  its  b;ing  immediately  exclaimed  against  by  the  licentious,  as 
ein  infringsmont  of  their  liberties.  That  it  was  the  settled  opinion  of 
some  of  tile  wisjst  men,  both  in  England  and  America,  and  the  best 
acquainted  with  the  aifiirs  of  the  Colonies,  that  in  their  present  state 
of  Gov  .rnment,  no  measures  whitso:!ver  could  be  pursued  that  would, 
in  any  degree,  remedy  those  glaring  evils,  which  were  every  day 
growing  to  a  more  enormous  and  dangerous  height.  That  Parli  u 
ment,  and  Parli  imont  only,  were  cap.bb  of  reestablishing  tranquil, 
lity  among  thos;;  turbulent  Puople,  and  of  bringing  order  out  of  con. 
fusion.  And  that  it  was  therefore  incumbent  on  every  member  to 
weigh  and  consider  with  an  intention  suitable  to  the  great  importanca 
of  the  subject,  the  purport  of  the  Pipers  before  them,  and  totally  lay. 
ing  all  prejudices  aside,  to  form  his  opinion  upon  the  measures  most 
eligible  to  be  pursued,  for  supporting  the  supreme  legislative  aulhori. 
ty,  tlie  dignity  of  Parliament,  and  the  great  interesUi  of  the  British 
Empire. 

This  if*  the  substinco  of  what  was  urged  by  the  Ministry  upon  the 
subject  whi-n  th:y  presented  the  Papers;  but,  as  things  were  to  bo 
brought  to  a  crisis  with  the  Colonis,  and  very  strong  moa*ures  were 
resolved  upon,  it  was  apprehended  th  it  the  merchants  would  be  af. 
fected,  and  make  some  opposition.  To  prevent  this,  all  the  public 
papers  were  systematically  fdlad  with  writings  on  this  subject,  piint- 
ing  the  misconduct  of  the  Colonies  in  the  strongest  colours,  and  in 
particular,  urging  the  impossibility  of  tiie  future  existence  of  any 
trade  to  America,  if  this  fl  igrant  outrage  on  commerce  should  go  un- 
punished. 

These,  with  many  other  endeavours  to  the  same  end,  were  not  with, 
out  an  eifect.  Thj  spirit  raised  ag  ;inst  the  Americans  became  as 
high  and  as  strong  as  could  be  desired,  both  within  and  without  the 
House.  In  this  temper  a  motion  wai  made  for  an  Address  to  the 
Throne. — Ann.  Regia. 

Second  Series.  3 


may  stand  in  my  estimation,  1  would  much  sooner  suppose 
you  guilty  of  some  fatal  negligence,  which  now  leaves  us 
at  a  loss  lor  those  proceedings,  than  presume  the  House  to 
have  so  far  forgot  its  duty  to  its  Sovereign,  its  country,  and 
its  constituents,  as  to  omit  what  was  so  strongly  recommend- 
ed to  its  consideration  from  the  Throne,  as  well  as  what 
was  in  its  nature  so  essential  to  our  most  important  inter- 
ests. And  even  you.  Sir,  (to  the  Speaker,)  1  should  not 
hesitate  to  charge  as  guilty  of  some  improper  conduct  on 
this  occasion,  sooner  than  the  House. 

Mr.  Solicitor  General.  Tlie  honorable  gentleman  over 
the  way  has  endeavored  to  entertain  us  with  an  epigram, 
but  it  wants  one  of  its  most  essential  requisites,  it  seems 
rather  too  long.  Foregoing  therefore  the  wit,  which  here 
comes  in  somewhat  unseasonably,  1  should  imagine  that 
the  grand  object  we  ought  to  labor  to  accomplish,  on  the 
present  occasion,  would  be  unanimity.  The  voice  of  this 
House  should  be  that  of  one  man.  It  is  not  what  this 
Administration  has  done,  what  that  has  omitted,  or  the 
mixed  errors  of  a  third,  that  we  are  now  to  consider.  It  is 
not  this  man's  private  opinion,  or  that  man's ;  the  particu- 
lar sentiments  of  this  side  of  the  House,  or  the  other.  We 
are  arrived  at  a  certain  point,  and  the  question  now  is,  in 
what  manner  we  shall  think  proper  to  act.  The  proposed 
Address  by  no  means  precludes  us  from  giving  our  opinions 
freely,  when  the  matter  comes  properly  before  us,  accom- 
panied by  the  necessary  information.  When  this  informa- 
tion is  properly  digested,  let  us  proceed  coolly  and  with 
deliberatif.n.  We  cannot  yet  determine,  whether  the  de- 
pendence insisted  on  in  the  Message,  may  be  proper  to  be 
vindicated  or  asserted.  We  cannot  even  say  but  it  may  be 
entirely  relinquished.  We  do  not  pretend  to  judge  what 
sort  or  degree  of  connection  may  be  necessary  to  be  kept 
up  for  our  mutual  benefit.  It  perhaps  may  be  prudent  to 
grant  them  other  charters,  to  enlarge  those  they  already 
have,  or  to  enter  into  commercial  regulations  different  from 
those  which  at  present  bind  them. 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke.  The  learned  gentleman,  who  has 
now  held  forth  with  so  much  ingenuity,  and  so  great  an 
appearance  of  candor,  has  left  his  epigram  liable  to  the 
same  objection  which  he  made  to  mine ;  it  is  not  short 
enough.  Besides,  he  forgets  to  enumerate  one  of  the 
qualities  which  distinguish  an  epigram,  and  which  mine  had: 
it,  I  think,  carried  a  sting  with  it.  The  learned  gentleman 
suggests  (and  I  presume  he  speaks  from  authority)  that 
the  several  Governments  in  America  may  be  new-modell- 
ed ;  that  connections  different  from  those  already  existing 
may  be  formed,  and  commercial  regulations,  planned  on 
another  scale,  take  place.  But  I  will  venture  to  inform 
him,  that  an  English  Government  must  be  administered  in 
the  spirit  of  one,  or  it  will  that  moment  cease  to  exist.  As 
soon,  I  say,  as  the  civil  Government  of  those  Colonies  shall 
depend  for  support  on  a  military  power,  the  former  will 
that  moment  be  at  an  end.  The  spirit  of  English  legisla- 
tion is  uniform,  permanent,  and  universal ;  it  must  execute 
itself,  or  no  power  under  heaven  will  be  able  to  effect  it. — 
[Here  Mr.  Burke  entered  into  an  historical  detail  of  the 
weakness  and  violence,  the  ill-timed  severity  and  lenity, 
the  irresolution  at  one  time,  and  the  invincible  obstinacy 
at  another,  the  arrogance  and  meanness  of  the  several  Ad- 
ministrations, relative  to  their  conduct  towards  the  Ameri- 
cans for  the  last  seven  years.  He  observed,  with  some 
degree  of  severity,  on  the  act  of  political  indemnity,  pro- 
posed by  the  learned  gentleman,  and  his  endeavors  to  con- 
found all  parties,  as  equally  involved  in  the  cause  of  the 
present  confusions  now  prevailing  in  that  country,  contend- 
ing that  all  dissentions,  occasioned  by  the  attempt  to  levy 
a  tax  there,  gave  way  to  perfect  tranquillity  on  the  repeal 
of  the  Stamp  Act.] 

Lord  George  Germain.  The  honorable  gentleman  who 
spoke  last  has  taken  great  pains  to  expose  the  conduct  of 
different  Administrations,  and  to  extol  those  who  advised 
the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Act.  For  my  part,  however  great 
the  abilities  and  good  intention  of  those  gentlemen  might 
have  been,  I  was  of  opinion,  tiiat  it  should  not  be  repealed, 
and  voted  accordingly.  It  is  now  contended,  that  that 
measure  produced  tlie  desired  effect,  and  that  on  its  passing 
every  thing  was  peace  and  tranquillity.  I  know  the  con- 
trary was  the  case,  and  we  had  evidence  at  your  bar  which 
proved,  that  the  Americans  were  totally  displeased,  because 
in  the  preamble  to  the  repeal,  we  asserted  our  right  to  enact 


35 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


36 


laws  of  sufficient  force  and  authority  to  bind  tliem.  I  am,  on 
the  whole,  fully  convinced,  that  the  prej^ent  situation  of  affairs 
in  that  country,  would  have  never  been,  and  that  the  People 
there  must  and  would  have  returned  to  their  obedience,  if 
the  Stamp  Act  had  not  been  unfortunately  repealed. 

General  Conway.  1  by  no  means  agree  with  the  noble 
Lord  in  any  one  argument  lie  has  made,  or  conclusion  he 
has  drawn  from  tiieni.  1  attribute  the  very  disagreeable 
situation  we  are  now  in  to  the  weakness  of  our  counsels, 
and  to  a  series  of  misconduct.  The  noble  FiOrd  attributes 
the  present  distracted  state  of  that  country  to  the  repeal. 
1  believe  he  has  neither  fully  attended  to  the  immediate 
effects  of  that  measure,  nor  to  those  which  have  followed 
fixjni  a  contrary  conduct,  or  he  could  never  have  given  such 
a  judgment.  The  operation  of  both  are  known,  and  1  leave 
the  House  to  judge,  which  was  the  healing  and  wliicii  the 
distracting  measure. 


Colonel  Barre.  1  shall  agree  with  the  motion  for  an 
Address  as  a  mere  matter  of  course,  not  holding  myself 
engaf^ed  to  a  syllable  of  its  contents.  A  right  honorable 
gentleman  near  me,  (Mr.  DoivdesweU,)  has  very  fully 
proved  on  a  former  occasion,  tl)at  our  present  peace  estab- 
lishment is  a  ruinous  one :  and  that  it  eats  up  that  fund 
which  should  be  appropriated  towards  relieving  our  burdens 
or  preparing  for  a  war.  I  have  the  most  authentic  infor- 
mation, however  improbable  it  may  appear,  that  the  ex- 
pense of  our  military  at  this  moment,  exceeds  that  of 
France.  These  may  be  matters  well  worthy  of  our  con- 
sideration in  the  course  of  our  proceedings.  It  may  induce 
us  to  make  a  very  considerable  saving  in  that  service. 

The  motion  for  the  Address  was  then  agreed  to. 

Ordered,  That  the  Address  be  ])resented  to  his  Majesty 
by  such  members  of  this  House  as  are  of  his  Majesty's 
most  honorable  Privy  Council. 


II.     THE    BOSTON    PORT    BILL 


HOUSE  OF  COMMONS. 

Monday,  March  7,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message 
[folio  32,]  together  with  the  Papers  this  day  presented  to 
the  House,  [folio  5 — 10]  by  the  Lord  North,  be  taken 
into  consideration  on  Friday  morning  next. 

Friday,  March  11,  1774. 

The  Lord  North  presented  to  the  House,  by  his  Ma- 
jesty's command  : 

No.  1.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  HutchiTison 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  28th  January, 
1774;  received  8th  March,  inclosing, 

No.  2.  Extract  from  tlie  Boston  Gazette,  of  the  27th 
January,  1774. 

Together  with  a  list  of  said  Papers. 

And  the  said  list  was  read. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Papers  be  taken  into  considera- 
tion at  the  same  time  that  the  Papere  presented  to  the 
House  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  Monday  last,  are  ordered 
to  be  taken  into  consideration. 

The  order  of  the  day  being  read,  for  taking  into  conside- 
ration his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message  of  Monday  last, 
together  with  the  Papers  which  were  presented  to  the 
House  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  Monday  last,  and  this  day, 
by  his  Majesty's  command. 

The  House  proceeded  to  take  the  same  into  considera- 
tion. And  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message  was  again 
read  by  Mr.  Speaker,  all  tiie  members  of  the  House  being 
uncovered.     And  the  said  Papers  were  also  read. 

Ordered,  That  his  Majesty's  said  most  gracious  Mes- 
sage, together  with  the  said  Papers,  be  taken  into  further 
consideration  upon  Monday  morning  next. 

Monday,  March  14,  1774. 

A  Petition  of  William  Bollan,  Esq.,  Agent  for  the  Council 
of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  New  England,  was 
presented  to  the  House,  and  read,  setting  forth,  that  the 
English  America)i  Colonies  were  deduced  and  planted  by 
the  adventurers  and  settlers,  at  their  expense,  in  foreign  in- 
hospitable lanils,  acquired  by  their  vigorous  efforts,  made 
under  the  authority  of  their  princes,  granted  with  the  en- 
couragement proper  for  this  spirited  and  noble  enterprise ; 
and  that  the  several  princes,  by  whose  authority  the  Colo- 
nies were  established,  and  the  numerous  nobles  and  other 
worthy  persons,  of  whom  several  were  men  of  tlie  greatest 
accomplishments,  endued  with  the  wisdom  proper  for  ob- 
taining and  preserving  Empire,  by  whose  advice,  aid,  and 
concun-cnce,  they  were  undertaken  and  advanced,  were  so 
tar  from  understanding  that  these  adventurers  and  settlers, 
who  by  their  travail,  expenses,  labors,  and  dangers,  should 
enlarge  the  public  dominion,  should  thereby,  contrary  to 
natural  justice,  lessen  their  public  liberties ;  that,  from  the 


many  letters  patent  Royal,  made  and  passed  for  obtaining 

and  regulating  new  dominion,  and  the  whole  history  of  their 
settlement,  it  manifestly  appears,  it  was  the  intent  of  all 
parties,  that  tlie  settlers,  and  their  posterity,  should  enjoy 
the  same  ;  whereupon,  they  became  adventurers  ;  and,  in- 
spirited by  their  confidence  therein,  with  their  long  and 
quiet  enjoyment  of  tiieir  public  rights,  overcoming  difficul- 
ties, perils,  and  liardsbips,  inexpressible  and  innumerable, 
they  raised  the  King's  American  Empire  out  of  a  dreary 
and  dangerous  wilderness,  with  so  great  and  continual  in- 
crease of  commerce,  that  of  late  years  it  hath  given  em- 
ployment unto  two-thirds  of  the  British  shipping,  with  a 
comfortable  support  to  no  small  part  of  the  inhabitants  of 
Great  Britain,  and  great  addition  to  the  dignity  and 
strength  of  its  Naval  Empire ;  and  that,  by  the  statute  law 
of  this  Kingdom,  it  is  clearlj  supposed,  and  in  effect  fully 
declared,  that  the  Colonists  were  well  entitled  to  the  En- 
glish right,  and  the  lands  they  inhabit  free ;  and  that  the 
Acta  Regia  of  Queen  Elizabeth  and  her  successors,  where- 
by the  acquests  of  new  dominion  were  made  and  establish- 
ed, and  security  given  to  the  adventurers,  planters,  and  their 
descendants,  of  the  ]5erpetual  enjoyment  of  tlieir  public 
liberties,  having,  as  tiie  Petitioner  presumes,  never  been 
laid  before  the  House,  nor  tiie  Colonies  ever  yet  had  any 
opportunity  to  ascertain  and  defend  their  invaluable  rights, 
and  the  House,  as  the  Petitioner  is  advised,  now  having 
under  their  consideration  the  state  of  the  Northern  Colonies, 
the  Petitioner  therefore  prays,  that  he  may  be  permitted  to 
appear,  and  lay  before  the  House,  authentic  copies  of  the 
proper  Acta  Regia,  and  to  support  the  matters  herein  con- 
tained, in  a  manner  suitable  to  their  nature,  and  to  the  in- 
clinations of  the  House. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Petition  do  lie  upon  the  table. 

The  order  of  the  day  then  being  called  for,  the  House 
was  silent  for  a  few  minutes,  when  Mr.  Cornwall  rose,  and 
moved  that  the  gallery  be  cleared.  This  occasioned  a 
vehement  debate.  Colonel  Barre  said,  that  if  the  motion 
was  insisted  on,  the  ladies  would  be  oliliged  to  withdraw. 
Mr.  C.  Fox  ^vas  of  the  same  opinion.  Mr.  Jtiikinson  con- 
tended, if  it  was  proper  to  shut  the  gallery  on  Friday, 
against  strangers,  it  was  much  more  so  then.  Mr.  T. 
Townshcnd  desired  that  the  standing  order  might  be  read, 
which  being  complied  with,  he  observed,  that  it  contained 
no  exceptions,  for  the  order  recited  that  all  strangers  should 
be  taken  into  custody.  Mr.  Grtnville  remarked,  that  it 
was  easily  seen  from  what  quarter  the  present  motion  origi- 
nated, as  he  could  perceive  that  applications  had  been  ma- 
king ever  since  the  House  met,  for  the  purpose  now  intend- 
ed to  be  carried  into  execution,  though  the  authors  did 
not  choose  to  appear  publicly  in  it  themselves. 

The  majority  of  the  House  did  not  seem  to  approve  of 
the  motion,  when  it  was  first  made  ;  but  the  interference  of 
the  Speaker  at  length  turned  the  scale,  and  not  only  the 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


38 


gallery  but  all  the  rooms  and  avenues  leading  to  it,  were 
cleared  about  four  o'clock. 

As  soon  a.s  the  House  had  resumed  its  former  tranquiU 
lity,  it  was 

Ordered,  That  the  order  of  the  day,  for  taking  into 
consideration  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message  of 
Monday  last,  together  with  tlie  Papers  which  were  pre- 
sented to  the  House  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  tlie  7th  and 
11th  days  of  this  instant,  March,  (by  his  Majesty's  com- 
mand,) be  now  read : 

And  the  said  order  being  read  accordingly, 
The  House  proceeded  to  take  the  same  into  further  con- 
sideration. 

And  his  Majesty's  said  most  gracious  Message  was  again 
read  by  Mr.  Speaker,  (all  tiie  members  of  the  House  beuig 
uncovered.)     Upon  which. 

Lord  North  rose.     He  said  it  contained  two  proposi- 
tions :  the  one  to  enable  his  Majesty  to  put  an  end  to  the 
present  disturbances  in  America,  the  other  to  secure  the 
just  dependence  of  the  Colonies  on  the  Crown  of  Great 
Britain.     His  Lordship  observed,  that  the  present  disor- 
ders originated  in  Boston,  in  the  Province  o( Massachusetts 
Bay;  and  hoped  that  the  method  he  should  propose  to  the 
House  would  be  adopted.     He  should  confine  himself  par- 
licularlv  to  those  disturbances  which  had  been  created  since 
the  1st  of  December.     He  said,  that  it  was  impossible  for 
our  commerce  to  be  safe,  whilst  it  continued  in  the  harbour 
of  Boston,  and  it  was  highly  necessary  that  some  port  or 
other  should  be  found  for  the  landing  of  our  merchandise 
where  our  laws  would  give  full  protection ;  he  therefore 
hoped  that  the  removal  of  the  custom-house  officers  from 
the  town  of  Boston,  would  be  thought  a  necessary  step ; 
and  that  the  consequence  of  that  would  produce  one  other 
proposition,  which  would  be,  the  preventmg  any  shipping 
from   endeavouring  to  land  their  wares  and  merchandise 
there,  by  blocking  up  the  use  of  that  harbour;  he  said  he 
should  move  for  leave  to  bring  in  a  Bill  for  those  two  pur- 
poses.    He  observed,  that  this  was  the  third  time  the  offi- 
cers of  the  customs  had  been  prevented  from  doing  their 
duty  in  the  harbour  of  Boston ;  he  thought  the  inhabitants 
of  the  town  of  Boston  deserved  punishment ;  he  said,  per- 
haps it  may  be  objected,  that  some  few  individuals  may 
suffer  on  this  account  who  ought  not ;  but  where  the  au- 
thority of  a  town  had  been,  as  it  were,  asleep  and  inactive, 
it  was  no  new  thing  for  the  whole  town  to  be  fined  for  such 
neglect ;  he  instanced  the  city  of  London,  in  King  Charles 
the  Second's  time,  when  Dr.  Lamb  was  killed  by  unknown 
persons,  the  city  was  fined  for  such  ;  and  the  case  oi Edin- 
burgh, in  Captain  Forteovss  affair,  when   a  fine  was  set 
upon  the  whole ;  and  also  at  Glasgoiv,  when  the  house  of 
Mr.  Camj)bell  Avas  pulled  down,  part  of  the  revenue  of  that 
town  was  sequestered  to  make  good  the  damage.     He  ob- 
served, that  Boston  did  not  stand  in  so  fair  a  light  as  either  of 
the  three  before  mentioned  places,  lor  that  Boston  had  been 
upwards  of  seven  years  in  riot  and  confusion,  and  associa- 
tions had  been  held  against  receiving  British  merchandise 
so  long  ago.     He  observed  that  proceedings  were  openly 
carried  on  in  the  beginning  of  last  November,  to  the  17th 
of  December,  denying  the  force  or  efficacy  of  the  laws  of 
this  country,  to  be  exerted  in  the  harbour  of  Boston;  that 
during  the  above  time,  there  was  not  the  least  interposition 
offered  by  the  inhabitants  of  the  town ;  that  at  their  public 
meetings,  they    had    regularly   given    orders    for   nightly 
watches  to  be  appointed,  consisting  of  a  large  body  of 
persons,  which  were  to  prevent  the  landing  of  the  tea.     As 
the  merchandise  of  Great  Britain,  this  surely  was  highly 
criminal,  and  a  direct  opposition  to  the  execution  of  an  Act 
of  Parliament ;  and  as  the  tea  belonging  to  the  India  Com- 
pany had  remained  twenty  days  in  the  harbour,  without  a 
clearance,  they  were  afraid  lest  it  should  be  seized  by  the 
custom-house  officers,    and  by  that  means  landed ;    they 
therefore  fiestroyed  it  on  tlie  20th  day.     That  this  appeared 
to  be  a  violent  and  outrageous  proceeding  done  to  our  fel- 
low subjects,  by  a  set  of  People,  who  could  not,  in   any 
shape,  claim  more  than  the  natural  privilege  of  trading  with 
their  fellow  subjects.     Tliat  Boston  had  been  the  ringlea- 
der in  all  riots,  and  had  at  all  times  shown  a  desire  of 
seeing  the  laws  of  Great  Britain  attempted  in  vain,  in  the 
Colony  of  Massachusetts  Bay.     That  the  act  of  the  mob 
in  destroying  the  tea,  and  other  proceedings,  belonged  to 
the  act  of  the  public  meeting ;    and  that   though  other 


Colonies  were  peaceable  and  well  inclined  towards  the 
trade  of  this  country,  and  the  tea  would  have  been  landed 
at  New  York  without  any  opposition ;  yet,  when  the  news 
came  from  Boston,  that  the  tea  was  destroyed.  Governor 
Tryon,  from  the  advice  of  the  People,  thought  that  the  face 
of  things  being  changed  since  that  account  was  sent,  it 
would  be  more  prudent  to  send  the  tea  back  to  England, 
than  to  risk  the  landing  of  it.  His  Lordship  observed  that 
Boston  alone  was  to  blame  for  having  set  this  example, 
therefore  Boston  ought  to  be  the  principal  object  of  our 
attention  for  punishment.  He  proposed  one  clause  to  the 
Bill,  which,  he  said,  would  prevent  the  Crown  from  re- 
storing the  re-establishment,  till  full  satisfaction  was  made 
to  the  East  India  Company  for  the  loss  of  their  tea.  He 
said,  he  did  not  propose  it  by  way  of  tax,  but  by  way  of 
restitution  to  the  injured,  who  were  our  own  subjects  ;  and 
to  let  it  go  forth  to  the  world,  that  the  Parliament  of  Great 
Britain  will  protect  their  subjects  and  their  property ;  that 
the  Crown,  by  that  clause,  will  not  even  then  be  obliged  to 
restore  the  custom-house,  unless  his  Majesty  is  thoroughly 
convinced  that  the  laws  of  this  country  will  be  better  ob- 
served in  the  harbour  of  Boston  for  the  future  ;  this  resti- 
tution entirely  depended  upon  Boston  alone.  He  should 
be  happy  to  have  those,  who  had  been  the  promotei-s  of 
these  disturbances  in  Boston  found  out,  and  that  they  might 
be  obliged  to  make  good  the  damage  to  the  East  India 
Company ;  but  as  those  persons  are  unknown  to  us,  Boston 
will,  no  doubt,  endeavour  to  find  out  such  persons,  or  pass 
acts  of  their  own  Assembly,  to  levy  such  money  in  the  most 
equitable  and  just  manner.  We  have  only  to  request  it  for 
the  East  India  Company.  He  said  that  this  Bill  was  not 
all  he  meant  to  propose  ;  that  other  parts,  of  more  nice 
disquisition,  will  remain  for  the  future  consideration  of  Par- 
liament. There,  perhaps,  might  be  other  methods  propo- 
sed that  were  better  than  this ;  but  he  had  as  yet  found  out 
none  that  deserved  a  preference.  Some  persons  had  pro- 
posed that  the  fishery  might  be  taken  away  ;  but  this,  he 
observed,  would  affect  the  Colony  at  large.  Others  pro- 
posed tiie  Straits  trade  ;  and  this  would  be  liable  to  the 
same  objection.  No  method  of  punishment  ever  came 
from  him,  but  with  great  regret :  he  therefore  hoped  for 
that  unanimity  in  a  vote  of  this  sort,  which  would  give 
strength  to  the  measure.  It  had  been  said,  that  we  owed 
this  proceeding  of  the  Americans  to  our  own  ill  conduct  in 
taxing  and  repealing ;  but  if  gentlemen  would  recollect, 
when  the  Stamp  Act  passed,  there  was  hardly  a  dissenting 
voice  ;  and  when  it  was  repealed,  it  had  the  consent  of  a 
great  majority  of  that  House;  that  the  doctrine  then  laid 
down  was,  that  external  duties  were  our  right,  internal 
taxes  theu's;  that  when  the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Act  took 
place  here,  the  clamour  raised  against  that  Act  in  America 
had  subsided  ;  that  the  non-importation  agreements,  it  was 
true,  were  not  remedied,  because  they  ceased  of  themselves. 
It  was  my  fate,  he  said,  to  propose  the  repeal  of  the  duties 
laid  on  in  1767,  and  to  continue  the  Tea  Duty  only.  The 
reason  was,  I  thought,  the  non-importation  agreements 
would  break  up  of  themselves ;  which  was  afterwards  the 
case.  It  was  proposed  by  some,  that  the  Tea  Duty  should 
be  taken  off;  it  was  urged  by  others,  that  it  would  then 
become  a  monopoly  of  the  Ea^t  India  Company ;  nor  did 
I  think  the  giving  up  the  duty  to  the  East  India  Company 
of  consequence  enough  to  venture  the  struggle  of  the  Le- 
gislative authority  of  this  country.  If  they  could  sell  tea 
cheaper  than  any  other  People,  they  would  certainly  have 
the  market  to  tiiemselves.  His  Lordship  observed,  that  at 
Boston  we  were  considered  as  two  independent  States  ;  but 
we  were  no  longer  to  dispute  between  legislation  and  taxa- 
tion, we  were  now  to  consider  only  whether  or  not  we 
have  any  authority  there ;  that  it  is  very  clear  we  have 
none,  if  we  suffer  the  property  of  our  subjects  to  be  de- 
stroyed. He  hoped  that  all  would  agree  with  him,  both 
peers,  members,  and  merchants,  to  jiroceed  unanimously  to 
punisli  such  parts  of  America  as  denied  the  authority  of 
this  country.  We  must,  he  said,  punish,  control,  or  yield 
to  them.  He  did  not  wish  to  molest  without  an  offence 
given  ;  he  therefore  proposed  this  measure  to  day ;  and 
observed,  if  such  conduct  was  followed,  it  would  tend  to 
cement  two  countries,  as  important  to  the  one  as  the  other ; 
he  therefore  moved,  "That  leave  be  given  to  bring  in  a 
"  Bill  for  the  immediate  removal  of  the  officers  concerned 
"  in  the  collection  and  management  of  his  Majesty's  duties 


39 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


40 


"  and  customs  from  the  town  of  Boston,  in  tlio  Province  of 
"  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  Amtrica  ;  and  to  discon- 
•'  tinue  the  landing  and  discharging,  lading  and  shipping,  of 
''  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  at  the  said  town  of  Bos- 
"  ton,  or  within  the  liarbour  thereof." 

When  Lord  North  sat  down,  there  was  a  perfect  silence 
for  some  minutes. 

Mr.  Grosvenor  got  up  to  second  the  motion,  and  con- 
demned very  much  the  proceedings  of  Boston ;  he  said, 
they  were  all  entirely  owing  to  the  repeal  of  the  Stamp 
Act. 

Governor  Johnstone  desired  to  know,  if  it  was  to  be  left 
to  the  Crown,  to  what  part  of  America  the  custom-house 
should  be  removed  ? 

Lord  North  said,  a  clause  was  intended  to  be  inserted  in 
the  Bill  to  leave  that  matter  to  the  Crown. 

Mr.  Dempster  observed,  that  should  this  indemnification 
to  the  East  India  Company  take  place  by  way  of  tax,  it 
would  be  collected  over  America,  and  thereby  injure  tlie 
property  of  People  who  had  been  entirely  innocent  of  this 
afiair  ;  that  when  he  spoke  formerly  so  much  about  taxa- 
tion in  general,  he  meant  not  as  to  the  right  which  we  had, 
but  only  as  to  the  prudence  and  policy  of  the  measure. 

Mr.  Sawbrid^e  got  up  to  speak,  but  the  noise  of  the 
Flouse  being  great  for  the  question,  he  sat  down,  he  said, 
till  gentlemen  had  done  coughing,  and  the  House  had  done 
calling  for  the  question  ;  that  though  he  could  not  be  heard 
now,  he  should  sit  cooly  till  he  could.  The  House  being 
little  silent,  he  said,  he  always  gai-e  his  genuine  opinion, 
and  he  was  now,  and  always  had  been,  of  such  opinion, 
that  this  country  had  no  right  to  tax  America;  that  it 
might  be  said  by  some  People  here,  that  America  Is  not 
represented  ;  that  if  this  country  had  a  right  to  take  a  sin- 
gle shilling  out  of  an  American's  pocket,  they  have  a  right 
to  take  the  whole.  He  then  sat  down  a  second  time,  the 
House  being  noisy,  and  said  though  he  could  not  be  allowed 
to  speak  long,  he  could  sit  long ;  and  observed,  that  this 
destruction  of  the  tea  was  entirely  done  by  a  mob  unarmed  ; 
and  Uiat  if  a  requisition  was  to  be  sent  to  Boston  to  make 
satisfaction  to  the  India  Company  he  made  no  doubt  but 
what  it  would  be  complied  with.  He  said,  he  was  against 
the  motion. 

Mr.  Byng  sa\d,  he  only  meant  to  ask  the  noble  Lord  one 
question,  whether  this  measure  was  not  preventing  the 
English  ships  from  trading  there,  and  a  punishment  on 
ourselves  ? 

Mr.  B.  Fuller  said,  the  Bill  brought  in  would  shew 
whether  it  was  a  punishment  upon  A  or  B  ;  that  he  should 
therefore  reserve  his  opinion  until  he  saw  the  Bill, 

Mr.  Dowdesioell  rose,  upon  which  the  House  thought 
the  debate  would  continue  ;  he  said,  he  was  of  opinion 
they  were  going  to  do  very  great  mischief,  and  should 
think  it  his  duty  to  give  that  opinion  in  tliis  early  stage  of 
the  Bill:  he  said,  this  Bill  was  to  punish  the  town  of 
Boston:  why  will  you  punish  Boston  alone?  Did  not 
other  towns  send  your  tea  back  to  England,  and  refuse 
the  landing?  Have  they  committed  no  offence?  He  asked, 
if  there  was  any  evidence  of  a  general  concurrence  of  the 
inhabitants  of  Boston ;  he  said,  the  examples  of  punishment 
the  noble  Lord  had  mentioned,  were  not  similar  to  the  pre- 
sent case ;  that  the  counties  being  obliged  by  law  to  make 
good  the  loss  between  sun  and  sun,  wal;  an  old  established 
law,  not  made  for  a  particular  purpose  ;  that  this  Bill 
would  be  an  ex-post-facto  law  ;  that  the  case  of  a  corpora- 
tion was  different  from  the  present ;  the  corporation  chose 
their  own  officers,  the  magistrates  of  the  town  of  Boston 
were  chosen  by  the  Province  at  large.  Would  the  House 
nor  hear  what  Boston  had  to  say  in  its  defence  ?  Would 
the  House  condemn  without  evidence,  in  the  absence  of 
the  parties?  He  should  trouble  the  House  no  more  at 
present ;  he  thought  they  were  going  to  do  a  wrong  act, 
nor  could  he  think,  that  the  cases  of  London,  KHnlwgh, 
or  Glasgow,  could  at  all  be  brought  as  examples  of  pun- 
ishment in  this  case.  He  disapproved  much  of  the  Bill, 
and  said,  he  should  give  a  negative  to  it. 

Mr.  Cavendish  approved  of  the  proposition  ;  but  hoped, 
il  the  merchants  of  this  country  could  any  way  be  injured 
by  it,  that  time  would  be  given  tlioin  to  come  and  petition. 
Captain  Phipps  said,  he  felt  no  reason  to  imagine  that 
any  opposition  to  the  Bill  at  Boston  could  be  effectual : 
That  It  was  no  new  thing  to  direct  and  order  a  port  for  the 


reception  of  the  trade  of  America;  that  harbours  were  in 
great  plenty  there ;  that  all  authority  had  been  trampled 
upon  in  that  country  for  many  years;  that  if  our  subjects 
could  not  trade  to  Boston,  they  must  go  where  thev  could 
trade  with  safety  ;  that  he  did  not  attribute  the  disturbances 
to  the  Stamp  Act,  or  the  repeal  of  it.  When  he  was  in  that 
country,  he  thought  that  that  Act  might  have  been  put  in 
execution ;  that  the  repeal  might  be  proper.  He  imagined, 
one  of  the  provisions  that  would  be  adopted  by  the  House, 
would  be  to  repeal  the  Declaratory  Act,  which,  he  said,  was 
tlie  most  absurd  and  unconstitutional  Act  ever  passed.  Let 
America  alone,  and  it  would  return  of  itself  to  obedience, 
and  do  not  let  us  scare!)  for  trifling  taxes,  by  way  of  expe- 
riment, to  try  our  power ;  the  moment  they  see  that  taxa- 
tion is  not  for  effectually  collecting  of  money,  but  for 
experiment  only,  they  will  always  oppose  you. 

Lord  G.  Cavendish  said,  lie  was  not  sure  but  the  object 
before  the  House  would  be  prejudicial  to  our  trade ;  that 
he  looked  lo  the  mutual  interest  of  the  two  countries ;  that 
they  were  united  by  proper  measures,  and,  he  hoped,  they 
would  be  kept  so  ;  he  wished  tiiat  no  idle  ideas  of  superio- 
rity might  prevail,  for  that  country  which  is  kept  by  power, 
is  in  danger  of  being  lost  every  day. 

Colonel  Brrre  said,  he  was  urged  to  rise  to  discharge 
his  duty  in  not  giving  a  silent  vote  upon  the  occasion.  The 
proposition  before  tlie  House,  he  could  not  help  giving  his 
hearty  affirmative  to ;  that  he  liked  it,  harsii  as  it  was ;  he 
liked  it  for  its  moderation  ;  and  arirued,  that  the  noble  Lord's 
{Nortfi)  conduct  would  be  of  the  same  stamp  throughout. 
He  said,  I  think  BoUon  ought  to  be  punished,  she  is  your 
eldest  son.  |Here  the  House  laughed,  and  some  members 
observed  by  him,  that  he  would  be  a  proper  person  to 
direct  the  admission  of  Irish  members  into  the  House,  as 
he  had  hinted  a  day  before  that  office  for  Mr.  Bigby.] 
After  the  House  had  laughed  heartily,  he  said,  I  mean  ycur 
daughter,  she  is  a  noble  prop ;  she  gave  herself  that  form 
of  constitution  she  now  has  ;  cherish  and  support  her.  He 
wished  to  see  an  unanimous  vote  in  the  onset  of  this  busi- 
ness ;  that  when  Boston  saw  this  measure  was  carried  by 
such  a  consent,  they  would  the  more  readily  pay  the  sum 
of  money  to  the  East  India  Company ;  that  he  hoped, 
if  they  did,  that  the  Crown  would  mitigate  the  rest  of 
their  punishment ;  if  the  Crown  went  further,  perhaps 
they  could  not  do  it  witliout,  as  Governor  Tryon  ob- 
served, at  the  muzzle  of  your  guns ;  that  we  had  given 
America  limited  and  prescribed  means  to  acquire  wealth  ; 
that  he  hoped  they  would  leave  the  rest  of  the  matter  to 
themselves  ;  that  he  had  often  thought,  in  the  coolest  hours, 
that  America  ought  not  to  be  taxed  by  this  country. 
Endeavour,  says  he,  to  take  the  power  of  taxing  out  of 
their  Assemblies,  and  it  will  be  strongly  opposed ;  he 
meant  not  to  stick  to  experimental  taxes  ;  the  tax  of  the 
Stamp  Act  was  made  to  please  this  side  [meaning  Mr. 
Grcnville's  friends]  of  the  House.  Go,  says  he,  to  some 
great  request  at  once,  and  if  they  wont  comply  with  it,  try 
then  your  power.  You  have  been  paying  £4,000,000, 
for  doing  of  nothing,  only  for  teasing  and  scratching  ;  I  wish 
to  see  a  fair  decided  line  at  once  ;  I  dent,  says  he,  see  any 
appearance  of  war  at  present ;  now  is  your  time  to  try,  in 
a  civilized  manner,  your  power  over  the  Americans  ;  other 
of  your  enemies  are  not  in  a  condition  to  take  part  with 
them.  I  am  not  in  office,  that  my  advice  can  be  taken  ;  if 
I  was,  I  should  give  it  freely.  If  office  comes  to  me,  it 
comes  as  an  atonement  for  repeated  and  unmerited  affronts. 
I  shall  at  all  times  speak  the  language  of  a  free  and  disin- 
terested member. 

The  motion  of  Ixird  North,  for  leave  to  bring  in  the  Bill 
was  then  agreed  to;  and  I^ord  North,  Mr.  Onslow,  Mr. 
Charles  Townshcnd,  Mr.  Attorney  General,  Mr.  Solicitor 
General,  Mr.  Bice,  Mr.  Cooper,  and  Mr.  Robinson,  were 
ordered  to  prepare  and  bring  in  the  same. 

Ordered,  That  the  further  consideration  of  the  Message 
and  Papers  be  referred  toaCoinmittie  of  the  whole  House. 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will,  on  Friday  morning 
next,  resolve  itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  to 
consider  of  the  said  Message  and  Papers. 

Friday,  March  18,  1774. 

The  Lord  North  presented  to  the  House,  according  to 
order,  a  Bill  for  the  immediate  removal  of  the  Officers  con- 
cerned in  the  collection  and  management  of  his  Majesty's 


I 


41 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


42 


duties  of  Customs,  from  the  town  of  Boston,  in  the  Province 
of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  America;  and  to  discon- 
tinue the  landing  and  discharging,  lading  and  shipping,  of 
goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  at  the  said  town  o{ Boston, 
or  within  the  harbour  tliereof:  and  the  same  was  received  ; 
and  read  the  first  time. 

Resolved,  That  the  Bill  be  read  a  second  time. 

Ordered,  Tiiat  die  said  Bill  be  read  a  second  time  upon 
Monday  next. 

A  motion  was  made,  and  the  question  being  put,  that 
the  said  Bill  be  printed  ? 

It  passed  in  the  Negative. 

The  order  of  the  day  being  read,  for  the  House  to  re- 
solve itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  to  take 
into  further  consideration  his  Majesty's  most  gracious 
Message  of  Monday,  the  7th  day  of  this  instant,  March, 
together  with  the  Papers  which  were  presented  to  the 
House,  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  the  7lh  and  11th  days  of 
this  instant,  March,  by  his  Majesty's  conmiand ; 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will,  upon  Wednesday  morn- 
ing next,  resolve  itself  into  the  said  Committee. 

Monday,  March  21 ,  1774. 

The  Bill  was  read  a  second  time,  and  committed  to  a 
Committee  of  the  whole  House. 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will,  upon  Wednesday  movn- 
ing  next,  resolve  itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole 
House,  upon  the  said  Bill. 

Wednesday,  March  23,  1774. 

The  order  of  the  day,  for  the  House  to  resolve  itself  into 
a  Committee  of  the  whole,  on  the  Message  and  Papers,  was 
discharged,  and  the  Message  together  with  the  Papers,  was 
referred  to  the  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  to  whom  the 
Bill  for  the  immediate  removal  of  the  officers  concerned  in 
the  collection  and  management  of  his  Majesty's  duties  of 
Customs,  from  the  town  of  Boston,  in  the  Province  of  Mas- 
sachusetts Bay,  in  North  America ;  and  to  discontinue  the 
landing  and  discharging,  lading  and  shipping,  of  goods, 
wares,  and  merchandise,  at  the  said  town  of  Boston,  or 
within  the  harbour  thereof,  is  committed. 

The  House  then  resolved  itself  into  a  Committee -of  the 
whole,  on  the  said  Bill. 

Sir  Charles  Whitworth  took  the  Chair  of  the  Com- 
mittee. 

Mr.  Fuller  said,  he  intended  to  make  an  alteration  in  the 
Bill,  by  first  substituting  a  fine  before  the  blocking  up  the 
port ;  lie  should  tlierefore  propose,  that  the  words  "  from 
and  after,"  be  left  out,  in  order  to  insert  one  of  his  own. 
He  said,  that  Boston  was  a  port  of  the  gi-eatest  consequence 
to  this  country  of  any  existing ;  that  the  Bill  before  them 
was  totally  unprecedented ;  for  that  the  case  of  Edinburgh, 
Glasgow,  and  others,  that  had  been  mentioned,  was  not  in 
the  least  similar;  that  the  penalty  of  blocking  up  their 
ports  was  too  severe  for  the  first  offence ;  that  when  the 
nation  came  to  know  the  contents  of  this  Bill,  he  was  sure 
they  would  be  dissatisfied  with  it ;  that  the  Bostonians, 
upon  the  first  rcsistence,  will  tell  you  they  will  not  remit 
the  money  which  they  owe  you ;  that  nothing  but  confed- 
eracies would  spring  up  among  tliem  ;  that  he  was  strongly 
of  opinion,  that  this  Bill  could  not  be  carried  into  execution 
without  a  military  force;  that  if  we  sent  over  a  small 
number  of  men,  the  Boston  militia  would  immediately  cut 
them  to  pieces  ;  that  if  we  sent  over  a  larger  number,  six  or 
7,000,  the  Americans  would  debauch  them  ;  and  that  by 
these  means  we  should  only  hurt  ourselves.  I  would 
begin,  said  he  by  an  amercement;  nor  would  I  wish  this 
Bill  to  take  place,  until  they  had  refused  the  payment  of 
it.  He  should  apprehend,  that  about  £15,000  would 
make  amends  to  the  East  India  Company,  and  would  in 
some  measure  be  a  relief  to  poor  Malcolm  (the  custom- 
house officer,  who  had  been  tarred  and  feathered.)  It  was 
always  a  rule  in  law,  he  said,  where  damages  are  done  by 
unknown  persons,  that  the  community  should  be  made  to 
pay ;  he  therefore  wished  that  the  House  would  adopt  the 
proposition  he  had  made. 

Mr.  Herbert  opposed  the  measure  which  Mr.  Fuller 
proposed.  He  said,  the  proposition  would  by  no  means 
relieve  us,  but  throw  us  into  greater  difficulties  ;  the  Bos- 
tonians would  certainly  resist  the  payment  of  the  fine  ; 
that  we  must  then  have  recourse  to  this  method.     The 


measure  proposed  was  still  more  likely  to  be  resisted  than 
the  Bill,  because  the  fine  would  be  laid  on  all  America, 
which  would  induce  others  to  join  in  the  opposition,  who 
before  were  not  concerned  in  it.  He  said,  the  Americans 
were  a  strange  set  of  People,  and  that  it  was  in  vain  to 
expect  any  degree  of  reasoning  from  them  ;  that  instead 
of  making  their  claim  by  argument,  they  always  chose  to 
decide  the  matter  by  tarring  and  feathering ;  that  the 
method  now  proposed  in  tlie  Bill  would  become  more  a 
punishment  by  their  refusal  than  by  their  compliance  ;  that 
the  Americans  alone  were  the  persons  by  whose  behaviour 
the  lenity  or  severity  of  the  measure  was  to  be  proved  :  he 
therefore  should  agree  to  the  Bill,  in  preference  to  the 
amendment  proposed. 

Lord  North  opposed  the  amendment.  He  said,  howe- 
ver great  his  obligations  were  to  the  candour  and  public 
spirit  of  the  honorable  gentleman  who  made  the  motion,  yet 
he  differed  much  from  him  in  the  amendment  proposed. 
His  lordship  observed,  that  tliough  the  honorable  gentleman 
had  said  it  was  the  first  offence,  yet  upon  recollection  he  was 
very  sure  he  would  not  be  of  that  opinion,  as  the  People  at 
Boston  had  begun  many  years  ago  to  endeavour  to  throw 
of  all  obedience  to  this  country ;  that,  indeed,  this  was  the 
first  time  that  Parliament  had  proceeded  to  punish  them. 
He  said,  I  am  by  no  means  an  enemy  to  lenient  measures, 
but  I  find  that  resolutions  of  censure  and  warning  will  avail 
nothing ;  we  must  therefore  proceed  to  some  immediate 
remedy  ;  now  is  our  time  to  stand  out,  to  defy  them — to 
proceed  with  firmness,  and  without  fear ;  they  will  never 
reform  until  we  take  a  measure  of  this  kind.  Let  this  Bill 
produce  a  conviction  to  all  America,  that  we  are  in  earnest, 
and  that  we  will  proceed  with  firmness  and  vigour ;  that 
conviction,  will  be  lost,  if  they  see  us  hesitating  and  doubt- 
ing. It  will  be  enough  to  shew  that  Great  Britain  is  in 
earnest.  The  merchandise  now  will  be  landed  at  Marble- 
head,  in  the  port  of  Salein,  which  is  putting  Boston  about 
seventeen  miles  from  the  sea  with  respect  to  foreign  trade. 
This  restriction  will  be  continued  as  long  as  they  persist  in 
their  proceedings  ;  it  will  operate  severely  or  mildly  against 
them,  according  to  their  behaviour;  if  they  are  obstinate, 
the  measure  will  be  severe ;  if  not,  mild.  I  believe  that 
Boston  will  not  immediately  submit  to  a  fine,  nor  to  the 
intention  of  the  present  Bill,  unless  it  comes  attended  with 
a  mark  of  resolution  and  firmness  that  we  mean  to  punish 
them,  and  assert  our  right ;  it  is  impossible  to  suppose  but 
some  of  our  own  People  may  in  some  degree  suffer  a  little, 
but  we  must  compare  those  temporary  inconveniences 
with  the  loss  of  that  country,  and  its  due  obedience  to  us ; 
they  bear  no  comparison  ;  and  the  preference  must  certain- 
ly be  given  to  the  latter.  The  honorable  gentleman  tells  us, 
that  the  Americans  will  not  pay  their  debts  due  to  this 
country,  unless  we  comply  with  their  disposition.  I  believe 
things  will  remain  much  in  the  same  state  as  they  did  upon 
a  like  occasion ;  they  threatened  us  with  the  same  thing  if 
we  did  not  repeal  the  Stamp  Act ;  we  repealed  that  Act, 
and  they  did  not  pay  their  debts.  If  this  threat  is  yielded 
to,  we  may  as  well  take  no  remedy  at  all ;  their  threats 
will  hold  equally  good  to  the  fine  proposed  by  the  honorable 
gentleman,  as  to  the  operation  of  this  Bill.  I  hope  we 
every  one  feel,  that  it  is  the  common  cause  of  us  all,  and 
such  an  unanimity  will  go  half  way  to  their  obedience  to 
this  Bill.  The  honorable  gentleman  tells  us,  that  the  Act 
will  be  a  waste  piece  of  paper,  and  that  an  army  will  be  re- 
quired to  put  it  in  execution.  The  good  of  this  Act  is, 
that  four  or  five  frigates  will  do  the  business  without  any 
military  force  ;  but  if  it  is  necessary,  I  should  not  hesitate 
a  moment  to  enforce  a  due  obedience  to  the  laws  of  this 
country.  Tlie  situation  of  the  troops  in  that  country  has 
been  such,  that  no  magistrate  or  civil  officer  of  the  peace 
has  been  willing  to  call  forth  their  strength  on  proper 
occasions  ;  it  will  become  us  to  find  out  some  method 
whereby  the  military  force  may  act  with  effect,  and  with- 
out bloodshed,  in  endeavouring  to  support  and  maintain  the 
authority  of  Great  Britain;  but  I  hope  that  this  Act  will 
not,  in  any  shape,  require  a  military  force  to  put  it  in 
execution :  the  rest  of  the  Colonies  will  not  take  fire  at  the 
proper  punishment  inflicted  on  those  who  have  disobeyed 
your  authority  ;  we  shall  then  be  nearly  in  a  situation,  that 
all  lenient  measures  will  be  at  an  end  if  they  do;  but  if 
we  exert  ourselves  now  with  firmness  and  intrepidity,  it  is 
the  more  likely  they  will  submit  to  our  authority.     If  the 


43 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


44 


consequences  of  their  not  obeying  this  Act  are  likely  to 
produce  rebellion,  those  conse(juences  belong  to  tliem,  and 
not  to  us :  it  is  not  what  we  have  brought  on,  but  what 
they  alone  have  ocrasioned  ;  we  are  only  answerable  that 
our  measures  are  just  and  equitable,  l^et  us  continue  to 
proceed  with  firmness,  justice,  and  resolution :  which,  if 
pursued,  will  certainly  produce  that  due  obedience  and 
respect  to  the  laws  of  this  country,  and  the  security  of  the 
trade  of  its  People,  \vhich  I  so  ardently  wish  for. 

Mr.  Oascoi^HC  said  he  diiiered  nuich  from  the  proposi- 
tion made  by  Mr.  Fuller,  as  an  amendment  to  the  Bill. 
Will  gentlemen  consider  w]i;;t  sort  of  Acts  of  Assembly  tiie 
Bosionians  have  lately  passed  ?  They  have  sent  over  one 
law,  to  be  appro\ed  of  by  his  Majesty,  for  the  raising  and 
purchasing  twelve  pieces  of  brass  caimon  ;  these,  he  sasd, 
were  to  be  produced  against  the  present  proposition  of 
amendment.  Do  these  proceedings  look  with  a  peaceable 
eye  to  the  proposition  of  his  honorable  friend  ?  It  is  not,  says 
he,  the  acts  of  tarring  and  feathering  only  that  shew  their 
displeasure  to  persons  who  have  oftended  them  ;  tliey  have 
other  modes  of  punishment,  which  they  make  use  of  by 
way  of  argument  and  reason;  the  house  of  any  pereon  with 
whom  they  are  displeased,  they  immediately  daub  over  with 
excrement  and  tar,  by  wliich  means  the  wjiole  family  is 
obliged  to  quit  it.  These  People,  he  was  afraid,  would 
hardly  ever  be  brought  to  reason  ;  for  the  moment  a  person 
otfered  to  argue,  the  reply  was,  either  tarring,  feathering, 
or  daubing  the  house.  The  Bill  before  tiiem  now,  he  ap- 
prehended, would  brinj!;  these  tarring  and  feathering  casuists 
to  a  little  better  reason ;  nor  did  he  imagine  that  a  military 
force  would  be  in  the  least  necessary :  as  their  meetings 
were  chiefly  made  up  of  merchants,  the  prescribing  limita- 
tions to  their  trade  would  be  the  only  way  to  bring  such 
merchants  to  their  senses. 

Mr.  Montague  (second  son  of  Ix)rd  Sandwich)  rose  for 
the  first  time  in  the  House.  He  said,  that  it  was  usual  to 
begin  by  making  some  sort  of  apology  to  the  House  as  a 
virgin  orator;  that  he  should,  for  tiie  present,  wave  that 
custom,  but  should  venture  what  little  he  had  to  say  with 
as  much  propriety  and  decency  as  he  was  able.  He  said, 
he  was  the  youngest  member  in  the  House,  and  therefore, 
might  more  properly  lay  his  thoughts  before  the  House,  in 
order  that  they  might  hereafter  be  corrected  by  men  more 
able,  and  of  greater  experience  ;  and  that  he  miuht  at  last 
be  induced  to  give  his  vote  at  least  rectified  with  some 
sanction  of  autiiority.  He  expatiated  much  on  the  load  of 
debt  which  this  country  had  incurred  on  obtaining  America 
in  Germany :  that  we  had  spilt  the  dearest  and  best  blood 
we  had  in  the  attainment  of  it ;  that  it  had  been  the  result 
and  deliberation  of  our  Councils  to  obtain  tlie  possession  of 
it  by  any  means,  and  at  any  risk  whatsoever ;  that  it  had 
been  the  darling  object  of  this  country,  ever  since  we  pos- 
sessed it,  to  cherisli  and  nourish  it  as  the  main  prop  and 
support  of  the  constitutional  body  of  Great  Britain ;  that 
after  all  these  struggles  for  the  possession  of  such  a  jewel  in 
the  crown  of  this  country,  it  would  be  madness,  it  would 
be  folly  indeed  to  the  last  extremity,  were  we  not  to  pursue 
the  most  determined  conduct  to  preserve  it;  the  giving  up 
that  gem  which  we  have  so  carefully  and  so  diligently  po- 
lished, or  neglecting  to  enforce  that  due  obedience,  and  cul- 
tivate the  friendship,  would  be  as  it  were  an  actual  surren- 
der of  all  our  right  and  claim.  He  spoke  much  upon  the 
indulgence  that  had  been  shewn  to  the  Colonies  by  the 
mother  country,  and  observed,  that  we  had  re*-,eived  nothing 
in  return  but  contempt  of  Government.  Was  this  filial 
friendship  ?  Was  tliis  that  debt  of  gratitude  which  was 
owing  to  this  country?  Or  was  this  that  bond  of  mutual 
connection  which  ought  to  have  subsisted  between  the 
mother  country  and  its  Colonies?  He  said,  he  looked 
upon  the  unity  of  legislation  to  be  as  essential  to  the  body 
politic,  as  the  Deity  was  to  religion;  that  the  disorders 
abroad  had  entirely  been  owinij  to  our  weak  Coiuicils  at 
home,  and  condemned  much  the  tame,  unmanly  proceed- 
ings of  Government  towards  the  Avuricaiis.  Those  acta 
of  the  Americans  call  now  loudly  for  that  power  and  diat 
interposition  wliich  has  been  so  long,  and  with  so  much 
danirer  to  this  country  withheld.  I>etus  now  proceed,  and 
consider  wjiat  it  is  most  prudent  to  do  in  the  present  situa- 
tion of  things,  rebus  sic  stantibus.  Let  us  consider  whether 
the  Bill  before  us  w  ill  not  l)c  the  most  proper  method  that 
nan  be  adopted.     The  Bill,  he  said,  would  ojicrate  as  a  res- 


torative and  palliative;  but  if  the  amendment  was  adopted, 
which  was  proposed  by  the  honorable  member,  it  would 
indeed  produce  a  punishment,  the  sting  of  which  Great 
Britain  would  in  some  n)easure  feel.  He  expatiated  also 
upon  gentlemen  in  that  House,  who  had  been  clamorous 
against  the  measures  of  Government,  with  a  view  to  make 
diemselves  jKipular:  he  termed  diem  a  faction,  whose  very 
existence  had  arose  merely  as  it  were  from  the  vilest  ex- 
crement of  the  eartli.  He  begged  pardon  for  having  de- 
tained the  House  so  long  ;  as  they  had  been  so  kind  and 
indulgent  to  him  in  the  attention  which  they  shewed,  he 
would  conclude  with  giving  his  hearty  approbation  to  the 
Bill,  as  it  bore  on  its  face  those  distinguisiiing  lines  which 
ought  to  be  tiie  true  characteristic  of  every  British  Minister, 
moderation  and  courage. 

Mr.  Byng.  i  rise.  Sir,  to  speak  my  mind  upon  tliis 
Bill.  Whatever  principles  I  have  hitherto  adopted,  be 
tiiey  right,  or  be  tliey  wrong,  I  have  always  adhered  to  ; 
and  as  I  live  with  such  opinions,  I  hope  I  shall  die  in  them. 
Men's  characters  are  known  after  their  death,  and  to  have 
steadily  adopted  one  uniform  set  of  principles,  from  which  I 
have  not  deviated,  I  hope  will  not  be  deemed  factious. 
This  Bill  will  prevent  all  importation  of  goods  to  Boston, 
and  thereby  create  that  association  in  the  Americans  which 
you  have  so  much  wished  to  annihilate.  You  are  not 
punishing  tl;e  Bostonians ;  you  are  punishing  the  English 
merchants.  Tliey.  Sir,  would  petition  this  House  ;  but 
they  might  petition  it  in  vain.  I  am  against  both  tlie 
amendment  and  the  Bill  itself;  I  therefore  propose,  that 
after  the  words,  "  not  to  import  goods,"  the  words  "except 
of  jBrt/ijj/i  merchants,"  be  inserted. 

Mr.  Stanley  said,  that  the  place  where  trade  and  mer- 
chandise could  not  be  landed  in  safety  was  not  a  port ;  it 
was  therefore  proper  that  some  other  port  should  be  found 
out  where  the  subjects  of  this  country  might  land  their 
merchandise  in  safety.  1  think,  said  he,  the  Bill  which  is 
now  before  you,  as  far  as  it  can  convey  punishment  will  be 
unavoidable  ;  something  must  be  done  ;  an  immediate  reme- 
dy must  be  had,  and  I  think,  none  can  be  adopted  so  free 
from  objection  as  the  Bill  before  you. 

Mr.  Dempster  said,  that  he  knew  of  no  Act  to  which  he 
gave  his  hearty  consent  in  a  more  willing  manner  than  to 
that  which  was  for  the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Act ;  he  said, 
our  disorders  had  arisen  from  our  attempts  to  tax  the 
Americans  by  that  odious  Act ;  he  was  very  sure  the  de- 
struction o{  America  uould  be  certain  if  we  should  ofTer  to 
tax  it.  Have  we  not,  said  he,  given  an  extent  of  power  to 
his  Majesty ,  to  prevent  the  port  of  Boston  from  ever  being 
reinstated  if  tlie  King  should  tliink  proper  ?  What  limit  or 
line  is  drawn  to  define  when  it  will  be  proper,  right,  and 
just,  that  the  port  of  Boston  should  be  reinstated  ?  He  said, 
the  dignity  of  Parliament  was  by  no  means  concerned  in  the 
disputes  with  our  Colonies  ;  and  that  we  should  treat  them 
as  our  children,  nourish  and  protect  them. 

Lord  North  rose  to  explain.  When  he  mentioned  the 
threats  of  Boston  were  not  to  be  depended  upon  at  the  re- 
peal of  the  Stamp  Act,  he  said,  he  did  not  mean  to  rip  up 
wantonly  the  mention  of  the  repealing  the  Stamp  Act ; 
that  he  begged  to  be  understood  in  that  light,  only  to  siiew, 
that  the  threats  o(  Boston,  at  that  time,  in  not  paying  their 
debts,  unless  the  Stamp  Act  was  repealed,  were  not  always 
to  be  depended  upon. 

Mr.  Ward  said,  he  was  surprised  to  hear  that  we  were 
not  now  to  tax  America  ;  that  he  was  equally  surprised  not 
to  find  that  unanimity  which  he  expected  upon  the  present 
Bill ;  that  he  himself  was  much  against  the  repeal  of  the 
Stamp  Act ;  that  he  had  presented  four  petitions  from  his 
Constituents  in  favour  of  the  repeal,  but,  that  he.  at  the 
same  time,  told  them  he  must  be  against  them.  He  ap- 
proved, he  said,  of  this  Bill,  because  there  was  no  other  re- 
source left ;  that  we  were  drove  to  the  wall.  He  disap- 
proved, he  said,  of  the  amendment. 

Mr.  Jenldnson.  I  think  Great  Britain  right ;  I  com- 
mend much  the  measure  of  the  Stamp  Act,  and,  as  the 
honorable  gentleman,  (Mr.  Grenville,)  who  was  the  au- 
thor of  that  Act,  has  been  much  praised  and  commended 
for  another  Bill,  (^le  Election  Bill,)  I  beg  leave  to  throw 
in  my  hearty  approbation  of  my  honorable  friend  for  the 
Stamp  Act.  VVhat,  said  he,  is  to  become  of  all  your  trade, 
if  the  proceedings  of  the  Bostonians  are  to  become  a  prece- 
dent to  the  rest  of  the  Colonies  ;  we  have  gone  into  a  very 


m 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


46 


expensive  war  for  tlie  attainment  of -4menea ;  the  struggle 
we  shall  now  have  to  keep  it,  will  be  but  of  little  expense. 
General  Conway  observed,  that  the  right  honorable 
gentleman  who  spoke  last,  had  spoken  with  some  degree 
of  wannth,  which  the  present  debate,  lie  apprehended,  did 
not  at  all  call  for.  1  will  just  say  one  very  short  word,  he 
said,  in  favour  of  the  Bill.  I  am  particularly  happy  in  the 
mode  of  punisiimentthat  is  adopted  in  it,  but  I  disclaim  any 
thing  in  the  debate  that  tends  to  call  up  old  sores,  or  create 
anger.  I  was  much  for  the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Act,  and 
am  not  ashamed  to  own  it ;  nor  do  1  think  that  that  measure 
was  the  reason  of  these  disorders. 

Mr.  R.  Fuller  said,  we  all  agree,  that  the  Bostonians 
ought  to  be  punished,  but  we  difier  in  the  mode  of  it.  He 
did  not  insist  any  farther. 

The  debate  ended,  and  the  blanks  were  filled  up  in  the 
Bill.     It  was  then  read. 

On  the  question  u]3on  the  clause,  which  vests  the  power 
in  the  Crown  to  restore  the  port, 

Mr.  Charles  Fox  said,  he  should  give  it  his  negative,  as 
it  was  ti-usting  the  Crown  with  that  power  which  Parlia- 
ment were  afraid  to  trust  themselves  with  ;  and  if  he  did  not 
succeed  in  his  negative  to  tiiis  clause,  he  should  object  to 
the  clause  following,  which  seemed  to  militate  against  the 
measure  adopted  in  this,  as  a  restraint  was  then  laid  upon 
the  Crown  until  the  East  India  Company  were  made  satis- 
faction. This  Bill,  he  said,  was  calculated  for  three  purpo- 
ses ;  the  first  for  securing  the  trade,  the  second  for  punish- 
ing the  Bostonians,  and  the  third  for  satisfaction  to  the  East 
India  Company.  He  said,  the  first  clause  did  not  give  a 
true  and  exact  distinction  by  what  means,  and  at  what 
period,  the  Crown  was  to  exercise  that  power  vested  in  it ; 
lie  thought  that  application  for  relief  should  come  to  Par- 
liament only,  and  that  the  power  of  such  relief  should  not 
be  lodged  in  the  Crown.  The  quarrel,  he  said,  was  with 
Parliament,  and  Parliament  was  the  proper  power  to  end  it; 
not  that,  said  he,  (in  a  kind  of  sneer)  there  is  any  reason  to 
distrust  his  Majesty's  Ministers,  that  they  will  not  restore 
the  port  when  it  shall  be  proper ;  but  I  want  to  hear  the 
reason  why  this  clause  should  be  so  left  in  the  judgment  of 
the  Crown,  and  the  next  clause  should  be  so  particularly 
granted,  with  such  a  guard  upon  his  Majesty,  to  prevent 
him  from  restoring  the  port  until  the  East  India  Company 
shall  be  fully  satisfied. 

Captain  Fhip])s  said,  that  nothing  surely  was  so  proper 
as  to  allow  the  Crown  that  power  which  always  had  been 
attributed  to  it,  that  of  mercy  ;  his  Majesty  cannot  deprive 
the  People  of  a  port  without  the  leave  of  Parliament,  but 
he  may  certainly  give  one  ;  as  to  the  power  being  lodged 
in  the  Crown,  of  restoring  the  port  upon  proper  contrition, 
it  is  highly  proper,  and  not  in  Parliament,  for  Parliament 
may  not  be  sitting  at  the  time  when  the  trade  of  Boston 
ought  to  be  restored ;  that  power  wliicli  has  a  right  to  give 
a  port,  has  also  a  power  of  appointing  quays  and  wharfs ;  if 
the  power  was  not  lodged  in  the  Crown,  quays  and  wiiarfs 
might  be  made  at  places  totally  inconvenient  to  the  custom- 
house officers,  and  thereby  prevent  the  collection  of  his  Ma- 
jesty's revenue. 

Lord  North.  The  test  of  the  Bostonians  will  not  be  the 
indemnification  of  the  East  India  Company  alone,  it  will 
remain  in  the  breast  of  the  King,  not  to  restore  the  port 
until  peace  and  obedience  shall  be  observed  in  the  port  of 
Boston.  I  am  ready  to  admit  a  clause  to  secure  those 
wharfs  and  quays  which  are  now  in  use,  to  be  the  same 
when  the  port  shall  be  restored.  He  observed,  he  had 
been  charged  witli  changing  his  opinion  ;  that  the  declara- 
tion which  he  had  made  tended  chiefly  to  the  punishment  of 
the  Bostonians,  and  that  the  Bill  particularly  adhered  to  the 
views  of  making  the  India  Company  satisfaction.  He  be- 
lieved tlie  House  would  do  him  the  justice  to  say,  that  he 
had  declared  botli  those  measures  to  be  his  intention  at  the 
first  setting  out  of  the  business,  as  well  as  to  restore  tlie  trade 
to  a  proper  footing ;  that  he  hoped  he  had  never  deviated 
Crom  them,  notwithstanding  what  the  honorable  gentleman, 
(Mr.  Fox)  had  charged  him  with  ;  that  he  should  never  be 
a.shamed,  at  any  time,  to  give  up  his  opinion  upon  good 
grounds  ;  it  would  be  the  height  of  obstinacy  not  to  do  it, 
when  he  saw  any  good  reasons  to  guide  his  opinion  to  better 
judgment. 

Mr.  Van  said,  he  agreed  to  the  flagitiousness  of  the  of- 
fence in  the  Americans,  and  therefore  was  of  opinion,  that 


the  town  of  Boston  ought  to  be  knocked  about  their  ears, 
and  destroyed.  Delenda  est  Carthago :  said  he,  1  am  of 
opinion  you  will  never  meet  with  that  proper  obedience  to 
the  laws  of  this  country,  until  you  have  destroyed  that  nest 
of  locusts. 

Colonel  Barre  said,  he  had  very  little  tiioughts  of 
troubling  the  Committee  upon  this  clause,  but  for  an  expres- 
sion which  fell  from  an  honorable  gentleman  under  the  gal- 
lery, delenda  est  Carthago.  I  should  not  have  risen,  said 
he,  had  it  not  been  for  those  words.  The  Bill  before  you  is 
the  first  vengeful  step  that  you  have  taken.  We  ouo'lit  to 
go  coolly  to  this  business,  and  not  trouble  our  heads  with 
who  passed,  or  who  repealed  the  Stamp  Act,  or  other  taxes. 
We  are  to  proceed  rcbiis  sic  stantibus.  Tlie  proposition 
made  ye  I  tliought  a  moderate  one,  though  I  must  confess  I 
hate  the  word  fine  ;  it  is  a  tax,  and  as  long  as  I  sit  here 
among  you,  1  will  oppose  the  taxing  of  America.  This 
Bill,  I  am  afraid,  draws  in  the  fatal  doctrine  of  submitting 
to  taxation  ;  it  is  also  a  doubt  by  this  Bill,  whether  the  port 
is  to  be  restored  to  its  full  extent.  Keep  your  hands  out  of 
the  pockets  of  the  Americans,  and  they  will  be  obedient 
subjects.  I  have  not  a  doubt,  but  a  very  small  part  of  our 
strength  will,  at  any  time,  overpower  them.  I  think  this 
Bill  a  moderate  one  ;  but  1  augur  that  the  next  proposition 
will  be  a  black  one.  You  have  not  a  loom  nor  an  anvil  but 
what  is  stamped  with  America  ;  it  is  the  main  prop  of  your 
trade.  Parliament  may  fancy  that  they  have  rights  in  theo- 
ry, which  I  will  answer  for,  they  can  never  reduce  to  prac- 
tice. America  employs  all  your  workmen  here :  nourish 
and  protect  it,  that  they  may  be  supported. 

The  clause  objected  to  by  Mr.  Charles  Fox,  passed  in 
the  Affirmative  without  any  division,  but  one  or  .two  nega- 
tives being  given  against  it. 

The  Committee  then  rose. 

Sir  Charles  Whitworth  reported  from  the  Committee, 
that  they  had  gone  through  the  Bill,  and  made  several 
amendments  thereunto. 

The  amendments  were  agreed  to  by  the  House ;  and 
several  amendments  were  made  by  the  House  to  the  Bill. 

Ordered,  That  the  Bill  with  the  amendments  be  en- 
grossed. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  be  read  the  third  time,  to- 
morrow morning,  if  the  said  Bill  shall  be  then  engrossed. 

Thursday,  March  24,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  be  read  the  third  time,  to- 
morrow at  twelve  of  the  clock. 

Friday,  March  25,  1774. 

Mr.  Crosbie  offered  to  present  a  Petition  of  William 
Bollan,  Esq.,  (styling  himself  agent)  for  and  in  behalf  of  the 
Council  of  tlie  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  and  likewise 
of  himself  and  the  other  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Boston. 

And  a  motion  being  made,  that  the  said  Petition  be 
brought  up  ;  it  produced  a  short,  but  wann  debate.* 

And  the  question  being  put,  the  House  divided;  yeas  40, 
nays  170. 

So  it  passed  in  the  Negative. 

A  Petition  of  several  Natives  of  North  America,  was 
presented  to  the  House,  and  read;  setting  forth, 

*  In  the  progress  of  the  Bill,  opposition  seemed  to  collect  itself, 
and  to  take  a  more  active  part.  Mr.  Bollan,  the  agent  of  the  Council 
of  Massachusetts  Bay,  presented  a  Petition,  desiring  to  be  heard  for  the 
siiid  Council,  and  in  behalf  of  himself  and  other  inhabitants  in  the 
town  of  Boston.  The  House  refused  to  receive  the  Petition.  It  was 
said  tliat  the  agent  of  the  Council  was  not  agent  for  the  Corporation, 
and  no  agent  would  bo  received,  from  a  body  corporate,  except  he  were 
appointed  by  all  the  necessary  constituent  parts  of  that  body — besides, 
the  Council  was  fluctuating,  and  the  body  by  which  ho  was  appointed 
could  not  be  then  actually  existing. 

This  vote  of  rejection  was  heavily  censured.  The  opposition  cried 
out  at  the  inconsistency  of  the  House,  who  but  a  few  days  ago  received 
a  Petition  from  this  very  man  in  this  very  character;  and  now,  only 
because  they  choose  to  exert  their  power  in  acts  of  injustice  and  con. 
tradiction,  totally  refuse  to  receive  any  tiling  from  him,  as  not  duly 
qualified.  Were  not  the  reasons  equally  strong  against  receiving  the 
first  as  the  second  Petition?  But  what,  they  asserted,  made  this  con. 
duct  the  more  unnecessary  and  outrageous,  was,  that  at  that  time  the 
House  of  I^rds  were  actually  hearing  Mr.  Bollan  on  his  Petition,  as  a 
person  duly  qualified,  at  their  bar.  Thus  said  they,  this  House  is  at 
once  in  contradiction  to  the  other  and  to  itself  As  to  the  reasons 
given  against  his  qualification,  they  are  equally  applicable  to  all 
American  agents;  none  of  whom  are  appointed  as  the  Minister  now 
required  they  should  be-and  thus  the  House  cuts  oft  all  commumca. 
tion  between  them  and  the  Colonies,  whom  they  are  affecting  by  their 
acts. — Ann.  Kegis. 


47 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL, 


48 


That  the  Petitioners,  being  natives  of  his  Majesty's  Do- 
minions  in  America,  and  deeply  interested  in  every  pro- 
ceeding of  the  House,  which  touches  the  Hfe,  hberty,  or 
property,  of  any  person  or  persons  in  tlie  said  Dominions ; 
and  that  the  Petitioners  conceive  themselves  and  their  fel- 
low subjects  entitled  to  tiie  rights  of  natural  justice,  and  to 
the  common  law  of  England,  as  their  unalienable  birtliright; 
that  they  apprehend  it  to  be  an  inviolable  rule  of  natural 
justice,  that  no  man  shall  be  condemned  unheard  ;  and  that 
according  to   hnv,  no   person  or  persons   can  be  judged 
without  being  called  upon  to  answer,  iind  being  permitted  to 
hear  the  evidence  against  tiiem,  and  to  make  their  defence; 
and  that  it  is  therefore  witii  the  deepest  sorrow  they  under- 
stand that  the  House  is  now  about  to  pass  a  Bill,  to  punish 
with  unexampled  rigour,  the  town  of  Boston,  for  a  trespass 
(MJimnitted  by  some  persons  unknown,  uj)on  tlie  properly  of 
the  East  India  Company,  without  tiie  said  town  being  ap- 
prized of  any  accusation  brought  against  them,  or  having 
i)een  permitted  to  hear  the  evidence,  or  to  make  their  de- 
fence ;  and  that  the  Petitioners  conceive  such  proceedings 
to  be  directly  repugnant  to  every  princi|)al  of  law  and  justice ; 
and  that,  under  such  a  precedent,  no  men,  or  body  of  men 
in  America,  could  enjoy  a  moment's  security  ;  for  if  judg- 
ment be  immediately  to  follow  an  accusation  against  the 
People  of  America,  supported  even  by  persons  notoriously 
at  enmity  with  them,  the  accused,  unacquainted  with  the 
charge,  and,  from  the  nature  of  their  situation,  utterly  inca- 
pable of  answering  and  defending  themselves,  every  fence 
against  false  accusation  will  be  pulled  down  ;  justice  will  no 
longer  be  theii"  shield,  nor  innocence  an  exemption  from 
punishment ;  and  representing  to  the  House,  that  the  law  in 
America  ministers  redress  for  any  injuries  sustained  there ; 
and  they  can  most  truly  affirm,  that  it  is  administered  in  that 
country  with  as  much  impartiality  as  in  any  other  part  of 
his  Majesty's  Dominions  ;  in  proof  of  this,  they  appeal  to 
an  instance  of  great  notoriety,  in  which,  under  every  cir- 
cumstance that  could  exasperate  the  People,  and  disturb  the 
course  of  justice.  Captain  Preston  and  his  soldiers  had  a 
fair  trial,  and  favourable  verdict.     While  the  due  course  of 
law  holds  out  redress  for  any  injury  sustained  in  America, 
they  apprehend  the  interposition  of  Parliamentary  power  to 
be  full  of  danger,  and  without  any  precedent.    If  the  persons 
who  conmiitted  this  trespass  are   known,  then  the    East 
India  Company  have  their  remedy  against  them  at  law ;  if 
they  are  unknown,  tlie  Petitioners  conceive  that  there  is  not 
an  instance,  even  in  the  most  arbitrary  times,  in  which  a 
city  was  punished  by  Parliamentary  authority,  without  being 
heard,  for  a  civil  offence  not  committed  in  their  jurisdic- 
tion, and  without  redress  having  been  sougin  at  common 
law.  The  cases  which  they  have  heard  adduced,  are  direct- 
ly against  it.    That  of  the  King  against  tlie  city  of  London, 
was  for  a  murder  committed  within  its  walls,  by  its  citizens, 
in  open  day ;  but  even  then,  arbitrary  as  the  times  were,  the 
trial  was  public,  in   a  court  of  common   law;  the  party 
heard,  and  the  law  laid  down  by  the  Judges  was,  that  it  was 
an  offence  at  the  common  law  to  suffer  such  a  crime  to  be , 
committed  in  a  walled  town,  tempore  diumo,  and  none  of 
the  offenders  to  be  known  or  indicted.     The  case  of  Edin- 
Imrgh,  in  which  Parliament  did  interpose,  was  the  commis- 
sion of  an  atrocious  murder  within  her  gates,  and  at^orava- 
ted  by  an  overt  act  of  high  treason,  in  executing,  aganist  the 
express  will  of  the  Crown,  the  King's  laws.     It  is  observa- 
ble, that  these  cities  had,  by  charter,  the  whole  executive 
power  within  themselves  ;   so  that  a  failure  of  justice  ne- 
cessarily ensued  from  the  connivance  in  both  cases  ;   howe- 
ver, full  time  was  allowed  tliem  to  discharge  their  duty,  and 
they  were  heard  in  their  defence.     But'neither  has  time 
been   allowed  in  tliis  case  ;  nor  is  the  accused  heard ;  nor 
is  Boston  a  walled  town,  nor  was  the  act  committed  witiiin 
it;  nor  the  Executive  power  in  their  hands,  as  it  is  in  those 
o{  London  and  Edin'mrgh;  on  the  contrary,  the  Governor 
himself  holds  that  power,  and  has  been   advised  by  his 
Majesty's  Council  to  can-y  it  into  execution  ;  if  it  has  been 
neglected,  he  alone  is  answerable  :  if  it  has  been  executed, 
perhaps  at  this  instant,  while  punishment  is  inflicting  here 
on  those  who  have  not  been  legally  tried,  the  due  course  of 
law  is  operating  there,  to  the  disr-overy  and  prosecution  of 
the  real  offenders;  and  the  Petitioners  tliink  themselves 
bound  to  declare  to  the  House,  that  they  a])prchend  a  pro- 
ceeding of  executive  rigour  and  injustice  will  sink  dixjp  in 
the  minds  of  their  countrymen,  and  tend  to  alienate  their 


affections  from  this  country  ;  and  that  the  attachment  of 
America  cannot  survive  the  justice  of  Great  Britain ;  and 
that,  if  they  see  a  different  mode  of  trial  established  for 
them,  and  for  the  People  of  this  country,  a  mode  which 
violates  the  sacred  principles  of  natural  justice,  it  must  be 
productive  of  national  distrust,  and  extinguish  those  filial 
feelings  of  respect  and  aftcction  which  have  hitherto  attach- 
ed them  to  the  Parent  State.  Urged  therefore  by  every 
motive  of  all'ection  to  both  countries,  by  the  most  earnest 
desire,  not  only  to  preserve  their  own  rights  and  those  of 
their  countrymen,  but  to  prevent  the  dissolution  of  that 
love,  harmony,  and  confidence  between  the  two  countries, 
which  were  their  mutual  blessing  and  support,  beseech  the 
House  not  to  pass  the  Bill. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Petition  do  lie  upon  the  table. 
Tiie  order  of  the  day  being  read,  the  Bill  was  accor- 
dingly read  the  third  time. 

Mr.  Charles  Fox,  then   proposed  as  an  amendment  to 
the  Bill,  to  leave  out  the  following  clause  : — 

"  And  be  it  further  enacted,  by  the  authority  aforesaid. 
"  That  whenever  it  shall  be  made  to  appear  to  his  Majesty 
"  in  his  Privy  Council,  that  peace  and  obedience  to  the  laws 
"  shall  be  so  far  restored  in  the  said  town  of  Boston,  that 
"  the  trade  of  Great  Britain  may  safely  be  caiTied  on 
'•  there,  and  his  Majesty's  customs  duly  collected,  and  his 
"  Majesty  in  his  Privy  Council  shall  adjudge  the  same  to 
"  be  true,  it  shall  and  may  be  lawful  for  his  Majesty,  by 
"  proclamation  or  order  of  Council,  to  assign  and  appoint 
"  the  extent,  bounds  and  limits,  of  the  port  or  harbour  of 
"  Boston,  and  of  every  creek  or  haven  within  the  same,  or 
"  in  the  islands  within  the  precincts  thereof;  and  also  to 
"  assign  and  appoint  such  and  so  many  open  places,  quays, 
"  and  wharfs,  within  the  said  harbour,  creeks,  havens,  and 
"  islands,  for  the  landing,  discharging,  lading  and  shipping, 
"  of  goods,  as  his  Majesty,  his  heirs,  or  successors,  shall 
"judge  necessary  and  expedient;  and  also  to  appoint  such 
'•  and  so  many  officers  of  the  customs  therein,  as  his 
"  Majesty  shall  think  fit ;  after  which  it  shall  be  lawful  for 
"  any  person  or  persons  to  lade  or  put  off  from,  or  discharge 
"  and  land  upon,  such  wharfs,  quays  and  places,  so  appoin- 
"  ed  within  the  said  harbour,  and  none  other,  any  goods, 
"  wares,  and  merchandise,  whatever.  Provided  always, 
"  That  if  any  goods,  wares,  or  merchandise,  shall  be  laden 
"  or  put  off  from,  or  discharged  or  landed  upon,  any  other 
"  place  than  the  quays,  wharfs,  or  places,  so  to  be  appoint- 
"  ed,  the  same,  together  with  the  ships,  boats  and  other  ves- 
"  sels,  employed  therein,  and  the  horses  or  otlier  cattle, 
"  and  carriages,  used  to  convey  the  same,  and  the  person  or 
"  persons  concerned  or  assisting  therein,  or  to  whose  hands 
"  the  same  shall  knowingly  come,  shall  suffer  all  the  foifei- 
"  tures  and  penalties  imposed  by  this  or  any  other  Act,  on 
"  the  illegal  shipping  or  landing  of  goods." 

And  the  question  being  put,  that  the  said  clause  stand 
part  of  the  Bill  ? 

It  was  resolved  in  the  Affirmative. 
Mr,  Fox  objected  to  another  clause  :  he  had  objected  to 
these  two  clauses  in  the  Committee.  He  said,  he  now- 
made  his  objections,  in  order  that  it  might  appear  on  th(> 
Journals  that  somebody  did  object  to  them.  He  then 
moved  as  a  further  amendment  to  the  Bill,  to  leave  out  the 
following  clause  : — 

"  Provided,  also,  And  it  is  hereby  declared,  and  enacted, 
'•  that  notliing  herein  contained  shall  extend,  or  be  con- 
"  stnied,  to  enable  his  Majesty  to  appoint  such  port, 
"  harbour,  creeks,  quays,  wharfs,  places,  or  officei-s,  in  the 
"  said  town  o{  Boston,  or  in  the  said  bay,  or  islands,  until  it 
"  shall  sufficiently  appear  to  his  Majesty,  tiiat  full  satisfac- 
"  tion  hath  been  made  by  or  on  behalf  of  the  said  town  of 
"  Boston,  to  the  United  Company  of  the  East  Indies,  for 
"  the  damage  sustained  by  tiie  said  Company,  by  the 
"  destruction  of  their  goods  sent  to  the  said  town  of  Bos- 
"  t:m,  on  board  certain  ships  or  vessels  as  aforesaid,  and 
•'  until  it  shall  be  certified  to  his  Majesty  in  Council,  by 
"  the  Governor  or  Lieutenant  Governor  of  the  said  Pro- 
"  vince,  that  reasonable  satisfaction  hath  been  made  to  the 
"  officers  of  his  Majesty's  revenue,  and  others,  who  suffered 
"  by  the  riols  and  insurrections  above  mentioned,  in  the 
"  month  of  November." 

And  the  question  being  put,  that  those  words  stand  part 
of  tiie  Bill  ? 

It  was  resolved  in  the  Affirmative. 


49 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


bt} 


On  the  question,  that  this  Bill  do  Pass  : 

Mr.  Dowdeswell  said,  he  rose  to  give  his  dissent  to  pass- 
ing the  same  into  a  law;  tliat  he  had  not  the  least  degree 
of  timidity  in  rising  to  oppose  it ;  that  he  always  thought 
the  proposition  totally  unjust  and  unfair.  By  the  Bill,  a 
person  is  to  understand,  that  the  commerce  of  all  his  Ma- 
jesty's subjects  is  interrupted  ;  and,  said  he,  I  cannot  give 
my  assent  to  it,  until  I  hear  the  complaints  from  the  differ- 
ent manufactures  of  iron,  leather,  wool,  Stc,  and  the  mer- 
chants of  this  country,  which  complaints,  1  imagine,  the 
liurry  of  passing  this  Bill  totally  prevents.  It  is  not,  says 
he,  that  any  other  goods  are  interrupted  in  the  port  of 
Boston,  but  those  which  are  charged  with  a  duty  from 
hence.  Look  to  the  consequences  of  this  Bill  ;  you  are 
contending  for  a  matter  whicii  the  Bostonians  will  not  give 
up  qfiietly.  I  remember,  said  he,  when  it  was  held  a 
doctrine  in  this  House,  by  persons  of  great  and  extensive 
knowledge,  that  wc  had  no  right  to  tax  America,  There 
is  now  no  such  opinion  ;  the  question  was  then,  "  Whether 
"  with  the  profits  which  we  receive  from  all  our  manufac- 
■'■'  tures  exported  hence,  it  would  be  a  wise  measure  to  tax 
■"  America  V  What  is  the  reason,  said  he,  that  you  single 
out  Boston  for  your  particular  resentment  ?  Have  there 
been  no  other  towns  in  America  which  have  disobeyed 
your  orders  ?  Has  not  Fhiladclj)hia,  New  York,  and 
several  other  Provinces,  sent  back  their  tea  ?  Has  not  the 
East  India  Company  suffered  nearly  as  much  damage  from 
the  tea  being  sent  back,  as  indeed  where  they  have  landed 
it  ?  Charlestown  is  the  only  place  where  they  have  suf- 
fered the  tea  to  be  landed  ;  and  what  have  they  done  ? 
They  have  put  it  into  a  damp  cellar,  and  the  whole  has 
become  rotten  and  useless.  You  find  yourselves  mtich  at 
a  loss  about  this  Bill,  and  are  hurt,  because  the  innocent 
are  likely  to  be  involved  in  the  same  punishment  with  the 
guilty.  You  are  now  going  to  censure  them,  in  the  same 
manner  as  was  done  in  the  case  of  Edinburgh,  and  Glasgow, 
where  the  l*eople  at  large  were  to  suffer  for  the  neglect  of 
their  Magistrates.  There  is  a  great  difference  between  the 
Magistrates  of  Edinburgh,  and  those  of  Boston ;  those  at 
Edinburgh  are  chosen  by  the  People  ;  those  at  Boston  are 
not ;  they  are  appointed  by  the  Council,  and  the  Council 
are  elected  by  the  Province  at  large.  You  are  going  to 
appoint  a  new  port,  where  there  are  neither  sufficient 
wharfs,  quays,  or  ware-houses  for  carrying  on  business. 
You  hereby  punish  the  British  merchants  much  more- 
severely  than  the  People  of  Boston.  The  folly  and  child- 
ishness of  carrying  on  such  a  project  is  certainly  very  evi- 
dent. All  that  you  have  effected,  is  to  carry  your  mer- 
chandise seventeen  miles  further  from  the  town  of  Boston, 
so  that  the  Bostonians  shall  be  obliged  to  be  at  an  addition- 
al expense  in  conveying  their  merchandise  from  the  port 
of  Salem  by  land.  You  ask  why  the  Americans  do  not 
pay  their  debts?  If  you  stop  the  exports,  you  will  of 
course  stop  the  payment  of  those  debts.  Now,  Sir,  let  us 
consider  how  this  Bill  is  founded  upon  principles  of  justice  ; 
if  Parliament  continually  passes  Bills,  sometimes  to  punish 
the  person,  at  other  times  the  places,  you  will,  by  and  by, 
have  your  hands  fully  employed ;  you  will  soon  inflame  all 
America,  and  stir  up  a  contention  you  will  not  be  able  to 
pacify.  The  passing  this  Bill  in  a  week  or  so,  does  not 
give  time  to  the  injured  persons  in  America  to  petition  this 
House  for  redress.  I  rejoice,  that  you  have  at  least  had 
one  petition  from  the  natives  of  America  residing  in  this 
country  :  the  language  of  that  petition  bears  the  face  of  a 
well  written,  unanswerable  argument ;  it  is  no  common  pe- 
tition: it  is  the  strong  and  pathetic  language  that  tells  their 
own  feelings,  and  those  of  their  fellow  subjects  in  America. 
I  wish  to  hear  some  arguments  offered  against  what  is  con- 
tained in  it,  for  it  will  be  said,  both  here  and  in  America, 
that  such  reasons  and  arguments  deserve  an  answer. 

Mr.  Wdbore  Ellis  said,  he  did  not  rise  to  answer  the 
honorable  gentleman  to  the  first  part  of  what  he  ad- 
vanced, being  arguments  which  had,  in  a  fornner  debate, 
been  urged  and  sufficiently  replied  to.  He  said  this  beha- 
viour of  the  Americans  was  the  most  direct  opposition  to 
the  laws  of  this  country  that  could  possibly  be  conceived. 
If  this  country,  said  he,  has  not  a  right  to  pass  a  tax  on 
Am.erica.  they  have  no  right  to  pass  any  law  whatsoever 
relative  to  it.  The  present  Bill  confirms  no  tax  ;  it  enacts 
none;  it  imposes  none  ;  the  tax  upon  tea  was  introduced  to 
prevent  tea  being  smuggled  into  that  country.  The  hon- 
FouRTii  Series.  4 


orable  gentleman  (Mr.  Dowdawell)  has  said,  this  Bill 
was  unjust  and  unwise.  I  differ  much  from  him,  and  think 
it  both  just  and  wise.  This  Bill  makes  it  expedient  for 
them  to  do  their  duty,  and  puts  the  Bostonians  upon  the 
inquiry  to  find  out  who  were  the  parties  that  committed 
this  riot;  the  persons  or  magistrates  in  the  town,  not  in- 
quiring into  the  proceedings,  are  much  to  blame,  and  I  can- 
not think  this  Bill  in  the  least  unwise.  Can  it,  Sir,  be  un- 
wise, unless  it  is  unwise  to  maintain  the  authority  of  this 
country,  and  to  punish  those  who  have  been  the  a<)-"-ressors 
against  its  laws?  The  honorable  gentleman,  he  said,  had 
mentioned  that  others  were  guilty,  and  why  were  they  not 
punished  ?  There  is,  said  he,  a  different  degree  of  crime 
in  each  of  them,  and  some  are  more  to  blame  than  others. 
It  is  treason  in  the  Bostonians,  and  can  only  be  deemed  a 
high  crime  and  misdemeanor  in  the  others  ;  but,  in  my 
mind,  it  appears  to  be  wise,  first  to  single  out  Bostonas  the 
principal  ringleader  of  the  whole  disturbance,  and  begin  this 
punishment  there,  in  order  to  see  what  effect  the  proceed- 
ings will  have  ;  1  therefore  think  this  Bill  wise,  prudent, 
and  just. 

Mr.  Edmund  Burke.  I  trouble  you.  Sir,  in  the  last 
stage  of  this  Bill,  because  I  would  not  appear  petulant 
when  my  objections  nm  to  the  whole  of  it.  I  never  knew 
any  thing  that  has  given  me  a  more  heart-felt  sorrow  than 
the  present  measure.  This  Bill  is  attempted  to  be  hasten- 
ed through  the  House  in  such  a  manner,  that  I  can  by  no 
means  assent  to  it ;  it  is  to  be  carried  bj'  force  and  threats 
into  execution ;  and  you  have  even  refused  to  hear  Mr. 
BoUan,  the  agent,  declaring  him  to  be  no  agent  for  Mas- 
sachusetts Bay,  or  not  properly  authorized  by  them  to  pre- 
sent such  petition  ;  you  have  not  now  one  left  in  Englaiul 
to  be  heard  in  behalf  of  any  of  the  Colonies  ;  the  only  ob- 
struction that  this  Bill  has  had,  has  been  owing  to  its  own 
vis  inertia ;  but  persons  who  oppose  this  Bill,  are  immedi- 
ately put  to  the  same  kind  of  punishment  in  the  public 
Papers  which  offenders  in  America  are.  Ix)ok,  Sir,  into  the 
public  Papers,  you  will  see  Cinna,  and  a  thousand  other 
Boman  names,  throwing  out  their  invectives,  and  tarring 
and  feathering  all  those  who  dare  oppose  the  Bill.  I  sup- 
pose 1  shall  reap  my  share  for  this  opposition  :  but,  Sir,  at 
all  events,  I  will  enter  my  protest  against  this  Bill,  and  will 
mount  my  little  palfrey,  and  speak  of  the  injustice  which 
the  Bill  contains  with  the  greatest  confidence.  The  griev- 
ance which  is  stated  in  the  Papers  before  you  on  the  table 
appears  to  be  an  universal  resistance  from  all  America 
against  any  goods  or  merchandise  that  shall  be  loaded  with 
taxes. — He  desired  that  that  part  of  General  Haldiman's 
letter,  declaring  the  resolution  of  the  Americans  not  to  sub- 
mit to  receive  goods  with  duty  upon  them,  might  be  read ; 
he  read  the  extract  he  had  made  in  his  place  ;  he  said,  the 
whole  meeting  in  the  town  of  Boston  consisted  of  six  or 
seven  hundred  men  of  the  first  rank  and  opulent  fortune  in 
the  place ;  that  the  proceedings  were  conducted  with  the 
utmost  decency.  He  said,  this  was  not  a  meeting  of  mean 
persons,  but  that  the  acts  of  resistance  were  all  counte- 
nanced by  universal  consent.  Observe,  said  he,  that  the 
disturbances  arc  general  ;  shew  me  one  port  in  all  America 
where  the  goods  have  been  landed  and  vended  ;  the  dis- 
temper is  general,  but  the  punishment  is  local,  by  way  of 
exchange.  Whether  it  will  be  effectual  or  not,  I  do  not 
know;  but,  Sir,  let  me  paint  to  this  House  the  impropriety 
of  a  measure  like  this  ;  it  is  a  remedy  of  the  most  uncertain 
operation  ;  view  but  the  consequence,  and  you  will  repent 
the  measure  ;  give  orders  at  once  to  your  Admirals  to  burn 
and  destroy  the  town  ;  that  will  be  both  effectual,  proper, 
and  moderate,  and  of  a  piece  with  the  rest  of  your  pro- 
ceedings, cventus  tristis.  One  town  in  proscription,  the  rest 
in  rebellion,  can  never  be  a  remedial  measure  for  general 
disturbances.  Have  you  considered  whether  you  have 
troops  and  ships  sufficient  to  enforce  an  universal  proscrip- 
tion to  the  trade  of  the  whole  Continent  of  America  1  If 
you  have  not,  the  attempt  is  childish,  and  the  operation 
fruitless.  Only,  Sir,  see  the  consequence  of  blocking  up 
one  port;  for  instance,  that  of  Virginia  Bay;  which,  if 
you  do,  you  will  destroy  the  tobacco  trade,  and  thereby 
bring,  as  it  were,  a  certain  ruin  on  your  own  merchants  at 
Glasgotv  and  Elinburgh.  This  Bill  has  been  thought  a 
vigorous,  but  not  a  rigorous  punishment.  It  is  my  opinion 
that  you  might  even  punish  the  individuals  who  committed 
the  violence,  without  involving  the  innocent :  I  should  ap- 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


52 


prove  inucli  of  ilr.ii;  but,  Sir,  to  f.ike  away  the  trade  from 
the  town  of  Boston,  is  surely  a  severe  punislinient.  Would 
it  not  be  a  risoroiis  measure  to  take  a\vay  the  trade  of  the 
Thames,  for  instance,  and  dirert  the  merrhandiseto  be  land- 
ed at  (fravescnd!  1  call  this  Bill  most  unjust,  for  is  il 
not  fundamentally  unjust  to  prevent  tlie  parties  who  iiave 
offended  from  hein;;  heard  in  their  defence ?  Justice,  Sir, 
is  not  to  be  measured  by  geographical  lines  nor  distances. 
Every  man,  Sir.  is  authorized  to  be  a  magistrate,  to  put  a 
stop  to  disturbances  which  he  perceives  to  be  conunitted 
against  his  Majesty's  peace  ;  but  did  you  expect  that  the 
People  wiio  were  not  present  at  sucii  disturbances,  would 
be  equally  punished  for  not  aiding  and  assisting  in  putting 
an  end  to  those  riots  which  they  never  saw  or  heard  of? 
This,  Sir,  is  surely  the  doctrine  of  devils,  to  require  men  to 
be  ))resent  in  every  part  of  America  wherever  a  riot  hap- 
l>ens:  but  this  Bill  involves  those  who  have  never  in  the 
least  been  guilty  ;  and  then  you  again  say,  tiiat  the  distur- 
bances whicii  did  happen  ought  to  liave  been  iuniiediately 
put  a  stop  to  by  the  People  o(  Boston,  and  that  they  were 
bound  to  preserve  the  good  order  of  tiie  town  ;  but.  Sir,  I 
have  too  mucii  reverence  for  the  image  of  God  to  conceive 
that  the  honorable  gentleman  (Mr.  WcJborc  Ellis)  does 
reallv  and  trulv  imbibe  such  a  doctrine.  He  then  read  part 
of  Colonel  Lsslie's  letter.  No.  45,  wiierein  the  Colonel 
said,  that  neither  the  Governor,  nor  the  Council,  nor  any 
of  the  custom-house  olHcers,  have  ever  yet  applied  to  nie 
for  any  assistance  ;  if  they  had,l  could  most  certainly  have 
put  a  stop  to  all  their  riot  and  violences,  but  not  without 
some  bloodshed,  and  firing  upon  their  town,  and  killing 
many  innocent  People.  VVhy,  Sir.  did  not  the  Governor 
at  once  send  for  this  assistance?  Was  it  contrary  to,  or  do 
you  think  he  would  have  broke  dirough  his  instructions,  if 
iie  had  endeavoured,  by  such  ways  and  means,  to  ))reserve 
the  public  peace,  and  prevent  violences  from  being  com- 
mitted ?  The  fault  of  this  Governor  ought  not  to  be  the 
means  of  punishinent  for  the  innocent.  You  have  found 
that  there  was  no  Government  there.  Why  did  not  the 
(iovernor  exercise  his  authority  ?  Why  did  not  the  ships 
execute  their  duty  ?  What  was  the  reason  they  did  not 
act  ?  Why  is  not  Mr.  Hancock,  and  the  chief  People,  who 
are  known,  punished,  and  not  the  innocent  involved  with 
the  guilty  in  one  universal  calamity  ?  You,  surely.  Sir, 
cannot  have  power  to  take  away  tiie  trade  of  a  port,  and 
■<all  it  privilege  !  Why  was  not  your  force  that  was  pre- 
sent applied  to  quell  the  disturbances  ?  How  came  they  to 
be  so  feeble  and  inactive?  How  are  you  sure  that  the  or- 
ders and  frigates  which  you  now  send  will  act  better  ?  I 
cannot  think  this,  by  any  means,  a  pmdent  measure,  in 
blocking  up  one  port  after  another ;  the  consequence  will 
be  dreadfid,  and  I  am  afraid  destructive  ;  you  will  draw  a 
foreign  force  upon  you,  perhaps,  at  a  time  when  you  little 
expect  it ;  I  will  not  say  where  th:it  will  end ;  I  will  be 
silent  upon  that  head,  and  go  no  further ;  but  think,  I  con- 
jure you,  of  the  consequence.  Again,  Sir,  in  one  of  the 
clauses  of  the  Bill  you  proscribe  the  property  of  the  People 
to  be  governed  and  measured  by  the  will  of  the  Crown. 
This  is  a  ruinous  and  dangerous  principle  to  adopt.  There 
Ls  an  universal  discontent  throughout  all  Amerirn,  from  an 
Internal  bad  Government.  There  are  but  two  ways  to 
govern  America ;  either  to  make  it  subservient  to  all  yoitr 
laws,  or  to  let  it  govern  itself  by  its  own  internal  policy.  I 
abhor  the  measure  of  taxation  where  it  is  only  for  a  quarrel, 
and  not  for  a  revenue;  a  measure  tiiat  is  teazing  and  irrita- 
ting without  any  good  effect  ;  but  a  revision  of  this  ques- 
tion will  one  day  or  other  come,  wherein  1  iiope  to  give  my 
opinion.  But  this  is  the  day,  then,  that  you  wish  to  go  to 
war  with  all  America,  in  order  to  conciliate  that  country  to 
tliis  ;  and  to  say  that  America  shall  be  ot)edient  to  all  the 
laws  of  this  country.  1  wish  to  see  a  new  regulation  and 
plan  of  a  new  legislation  in  that  country,  not  founded  upon 
your  laws  and  statutes  here,  but  grounded  upon  the  vital 
principles  of  Eniclish  lilierty. 

Mr.  Grei/  Cooper  said,  he  could  not  agree  in  the 
doctrines  laid  down  by  the  honorable  gentleman  who  spoke 
last,  that  the  Bill  was  unjust  or  unwise  ;  it  was.  in  his 
opinion,  a  temperate  and  pmdent  law,  to  preserve  the  trade 
of  this  country,  and  protect  the  peace  of  America  ;  he  was 
sorry  to  find  that  honorable  gentleman  in  particular  should 
be  upbraiding  (iovernment  for  not  making  use  of  militaiy 
force  :  nor  should  he  have  expected  that  such  u  proposition 


woidd  have  come  from  him.  It  has  been  said  that  the 
Ameiicans  cannot  be  heard  in  tiieir  ow  n  defence  before  this 
measure  takes  etl'ect.  Look  at  the  papers  on  the  table, 
where  you  see  the  resolutions  of  their  public  meetings  or- 
flered  to  be  sent  over  here,  that  we  might  be  acquainted 
witii  them.  After  such  a  defiance,  can  it  be  expected, 
that  thev  would  come  over  here  to  be  heard,  and  say  any 
thing  at  your  bar  but  what  they  had  already  told  you,  and 
sent  to  you  expressly  in  the  |)apers  on  your  table,  where 
they  refuse  a  direct  obedience  to  all  your  laws  ?  It  is  asked 
ai;ain,  Sir,  whether  the  individuals  are  not  to  be  punished 
when  they  are  found  out?  I  appreliend.  Sir,  that  this 
measure  by  no  means  excuses  the  guilty  persons  from  being 
brouuiil  to  condign  punishment.  The  IJlaik  Act  of  this 
country  is  a  similar  case  with  regard  to  this  Bill,  where  the 
hundred  are  fined  in  the  penalty  of  £200  for  not  suppress- 
ing the  offences  mentioned  in  that  Act,  such  as  cutting 
down  trees,  breaking  hanks,  and  other  misdemeanors.  The 
whole  hundred,  in  this  case,  are  not  present  at  the  commis- 
sion of  the  crime,  yet  they  are  ]ninished  for  it ;  nor  docs 
that  fine  excuse  the  criminal  from  beins:  particularly  punish- 
ed, where  the  aggressor  can  be  found  out.  The  Bill  before 
you  is  a  law  for  the  protection  of  trade  ;  it  is  a  mild  measure, 
if  they  obey  it;  if  they  oppose  it.  the  result  of  it  will  onlv 
make  the  punishinent.  The  resolves  at  Boston  I  consider 
as  direct  issue  against  the  Declaratory  Act ;  they  clearly 
proved  a  determined  resolution  in  the  Americans  to  oppose 
every  law  of  this  country  ;  hut  the  Bostonians  alone  have 
carried  into  execution  what  otliers  have  only  resolved. 
This  Bill,  Sir,  I  look  upon  to  be  the  act  of  a  father  chastis- 
ing his  son  on  one  line,  and  restoring  the  trade  and  peace 
of  America  on  the  other,  and  therefore  I  highly  approve  of 
the  measure. 

Mr.  Anthony  Bacon  said  there  was  not  a  port  in  New- 
England  but  what  had  suflicient  ware-houses  for  the  re- 
ception of  all  the  merchandise  of  Great  Britain. 

Governor  Potvnall  said,  that  he  had  always  been  of 
opinion,  that  internal  taxes  could  not  legally  be  laid,  but 
that  he  agreed  in  external  ones;  tlrat  there  wanted  a  revi- 
sion of  the  general  laws  relating  to  America;  he  said  he 
wished  that  the  Tea  Duty  was  repealed,  but  he  did  not 
think  this  the  proper  time  or  season  to  adopt  the  measure. 
There  ought  also  to  be  a  review  of  die  Governments;  the 
Americans  have  a  real  love  for  Government ;  tliev  love 
order  and  peace,  [here  the  House  laughed;]  he  said,  I  do 
aver  that  they  love  peace,  for  I  look  upon  this  to  be  the  act 
of  the  mob,  and  not  of  the  People,  and  wait  but  a  little  it 
w-ill  regulate  itself. 

The  Lord  Advocate  said,  the  question  had  been  very 
fully  argued,  and  he  should  iiive  his  heartv  affimiative  to 
the  Bill. 

Lord  John  Cavendish  spoke  a  few  words  airainst  the 
Bill,  and  said,  he  should  give  his  negative  to  its  passing  in 
its  jiresent  foim. 

Mr.  T.  Townshend  spoke  also  against  the  Bill,  and  said, 
he  should  be  against  its  passing  into  a  law. 

Mr.  Sawhridge  said,  the  offence  of  destroying  the  tea 
was  done  in  the  night  time,  and  not  tempore  diurno  :  tliat 
this  was  an  ex-post-facio  law,  and  that  the  law  of  the  Black 
Act,  which  had  been  mentioned,  was  not  in  force  before  the 
offence  was  committed  ;  that  as  far  as  that,  or  any  other  pre- 
cedent participated  of  this  law,  so  far  thev  were  most  ini- 
quitous ;  that  it  was  an  act  of  cowardice  in  the  Minister  to 
come  to  Parliament  to  ask  tor  that  which  had  been  allowed, 
and  was  in  the  power  of  the  Crown  to  order  and  direct :  he 
meant,  he  said,  the  removal  of  the  custom-house  officers, 
and  other  things  mentioned  in  that  Act,  the  preservation  of 
the  peace,  and  the  executive  authority  in  that  country.  All 
these  might  have  been  done  by  the  Crown,  without  apply- 
ing to  Parliament,  but  die  Minister  was  timorous  of  pro- 
ceeding himself,  and  wanted  to  skulk  behind  the  protection 
of  the  Legislature. 

Lord  North  said,  he  rose  to  explain  himself,  and  was 
sorry  to  commit  an  offence  to  the  House  at  that  hour  of  the 
night,  and  especially  as  it  would  be  to  the  disturbance  of 
the  neighbourhood,  who  are  totally  innocent,  [alluding  to 
the  charge  that  had  been  made  by  Mr.  Saivhridge.  that  the 
innocent  People  in  the  town  of  Boston  would  suffer  equally 
with  the  offenders  ;]  nor  am  L  Sir,  ashamed,  at  any  time 
to  take  shelter  under  the  Legislature.  The  honorable 
gentleman  says,  the    Minister   might  do    certain  things. 


1 


53 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


54 


wliich  are  to  be  enacted  in  that  Bill,  without  application 
to  Piii-liaiiient,  such  as  changing  tlie  custom-house  oilicei-s, 
ordering  the  peace  to  he  preser\'ed,  and  a  better  regulation 
of  internal  Government  to  take  place  ;  but  that  they  could 
not  block  up  a  port,  or  make  it  illegal  for  the  landing,  la- 
ding, and  shipiiing  of  goods  in  any  place  heretofore  granted, 
without  the  aid  of  Parliament.  1  will  not  undertake  to  say 
what  will  he  the  consequence  or  event  of  this  measure;  I 
ain  strongly  of  opinion  it  will  be  salutary  and  effective ; 
but  I  will  say,  that  it  was  not  in  the  power  of  the  Minister 
to  sit  still  and  take  no  measure.  I  believe.  Sir,  that  no 
prosecution  in  that  country,  according  to  its  present  Ibrni  of 
Government,  will  be  effectual;  1  was  tiierefore  nuich  for 
adopting  the  measure  pro])osed.  It  certainly  may  be  right 
to  direct  a  prosecution  against  those  individuals  who  may  be 
found  offenders ;  but  can  the  honorable  gentleman  be  of 
opinion,  from  what  he  has  seen  and  read  from  the  papers 
on  the  table,  that  ;uiy  obedience  will  be  paid  to  such  a 
])rosecution,  or  that  it  will  be  in  the  least  degree  effective  ? 
This  measure  will  certainly  not  excuse  the  individual  of- 
fenders, any  more  than  the  fine  upon  a  county,  between 
sun  and  sun,  will  excuse  the  person  who  committed  tiie 
robbery.  This  is  no  ex-post-facto  law;  they  committed 
the  offence  of  destroying  the  tea,  knowing  and  declaring 
at  the  same  time,  the  law  which  they  offended  against. 
The  Committee  of  Boston,  Sir,  gave  the  directions  lor  the 
destruction  of  the  tea,  and  have  declared  their  resolution 
of  resistance  to  the  obedience  of  our  laws  ;  yet  we  are  de- 
sired to  hear  them  ;  to  hear  those  very  persons  who  have 
declared  to  you,  and  to  all  the  world,  that  they  intended 
this  violence  against  the  law ;  therefore,  it  is  said,  Sir,  by 
some  honorable  gentlemen  in  this  House,  that  we  ought 
not  to  proceed  in  this  measure  till  we  have  heard  these  very 
People,  who  are  the  great  offenders,  say  at  your  bar,  in 
tJieir  defence,  that  Great  Britain  has  no  authority  to  tax 
them  :  they  can  make  no  other  plea ;  they  can  make  no 
other  declaration  than  what  they  have  already  done  ;  but. 
Sir,  we  must  adopt  the  measure,  let  what  will  be  the  conse- 
quence. I  hope  and  conclude  it  will  he  a  happy  one.  Is 
this  then  the  best  measure  in  the  present  case  ?  It  certainly 
is :  I  hear  of  none  other  preferable,  or  I  would  adopt  it. 
It  is  to  tell  America,  that  you  are  in  earnest.  If  we  do  not 
mean  totally  to  give  up  the  matter  in  question,  we  must  as- 
sert our  right  at  this  time,  while  we  can,  whilst  it  is  in  our 
power.  Instead  of  our  treating  America  like  a  foreign 
enemy,  America  has  treated  us  like  one  ;  disavowing  our 
authority,  and  declaring  against  all  obedience  to  the  laws  of 
Great  Britain.  We  are  threatened  again,  by  one  honora- 
ble gentleman,  lest  a  foreign  enemy  should,  in  this  emer- 
gency, start  up — he  stopped  short,  and  said  he  would  say 
no  more  upon  that  head.  I  suppose  he  meant  that  this 
foreign  enemy  would  lay  hold  of  America  during  our  con- 
test. Time  of  peace.  Sir,  is  the  only  season  for  adopting 
regulations.  This  is  the  crisis,  then,  in  which  that  contest 
ought  to  be  determined.  Another  honorable  friend  of  mine 
is  for  repealing  the  Tea  Duty.  1  am  of  opinion.  Sir,  that  re- 
pealing any  measure  whatever,  at  this  moment)  would  stamp 
us  with  a  degree  of  timidity,  and  would  produce  a  totally 
different  effect  from  what  I  expect  this  measure  will  do. 

Governor  Johnstone,  I  find  so  much  difficulty  in  pro- 
nouncing my  sentiments  at  any  time,  that  unless  the  House 
is  kindly  disposed  to  hear  me  at  this  late  hour,  I  shall 
patiently  sit  down,  because  I  am  conscious  it  will  require 
their  greatest  indulgence,  to  enable  me  to  express  myself 
in  a  manner  worthy  of  their  attention.  A  modesty  becom- 
ing my  situation  prevented  me  from  offering  my  opinion 
before,  when  I  saw  men  of  so  much  superior  ability  rising 
from  the  beginning  of  the  debate. 

It  may  ap|)ear  arrogant  in  a  member  so  inferior,  as  I 
confess  myself  to  be,  to  offer  objections  to  a  Bill  so  exten- 
sive in  its  consequences,  under  every  consideration,  espe- 
cially after  it  nuist  have  been  so  maturely  considered,  in 
every  article,  by  men  so  distinguished  by  their  talents,  and 
high  stations  in  office,  besides  the  general  applause  which 
has  followed  the  Bill  in  its  rapid  progress  through  this 
House :  nevertheless,  though  naturally  diffident  of  my 
opinion,  when  I  had  the  good  or  bad  fortune  (I  dont  know 
which  to  term  it)  of  prognosticating  to  the  Chairman  of  the 
East  India  Company  the  consequences  of  sending  this  tea, 
on  their  own  acrovmt,  to  America,  and  that  the  event  has 
literally  fidfilled  my  words,  as  it  is  well  known  to  some 


members  now  in  my  eye,  it  makes  mc  more  confident  in 
warning  the  House  of  what  I  apprehend  will  be  the  con- 
sequences of  this  Bill. 

I  told  the  Chairman  of  the  East  India  Company,  first 
in  conversation,  on  asking  my  opinion,  and  afterwards  by 
letter,  that  the  evidence  might  appear  in  the  progress  of 
things ;  that  I  conceived  the  East  India  Conqjany  export- 
ing tea,  on  their  own  account,  was,  under  every  consider- 
ation of  their  situation,  and  institution,  wrong,  but,  under 
the  present  discontents  and  disputed  matters  of  Government 
in  America,  criminally  absurd,  because  they  were  pre- 
senting themselves  as  the  butt  in  the  controversy,  where 
they  woidd  probably  come  off  with  the  loss  of  the  whole. 
The  event  has  justified  my  prediction  ;  for  whatever  repay- 
ment the  Company  may  obtain  from  the  town  of  Boston, 
under  these  cruel  coercive  measures  now  proposed,  (the  ef- 
fect of  which  I  still  doubt,)  yet  the  Company  must  remain 
great  losers,  even  if  the  other  Provinces,  equally  culpable, 
are  made  to  refund  the  loss  arising  from  their  conduct, 
because  it  was  not  supplies  of  cash,  at  a  distant  period,  the 
Company  wanted,  hut  an  immediate  supply,  to  answer  a 
temporary  exigency,  which  a  combina'tion  of  the  enemies 
of  the  country  iiad  produced. 

I  now  venture  to  predict  to  this  House,  that  the  effect  of 
the  present  Bill  must  be  productive  of  a  General  Confed- 
eracy, to  resist  the  power  of  this  country.  It  is  irritating, 
tempting  nay,  inviting  men ,  to  those  deeds  by  ineffectual 
expedients,  the  abortions  of  an  undecisive  mind,  incapable 
of  comprehending  the  chain  of  consequences  \jhich  must 
result  from  such  a  law.  I  am  not  one  of  those  who  believe 
that  distant  Provinces  can  be  retained  in  their  duty  by 
preaching  or  enchantments ;  I  believe  that  vorce  or 
POWER,  conducted  with  wisdom,  are  the  means  of  securing 
regular  obedience  under  every  establishment ;  but  that  such 
Ibrce  should  never  be  applied  to  any  degree  of  rigour,  unless 
it  should  carry  the  general  approbation  of  mankind  in  the 
execution.  However  much  such  approbation  may  prevail 
at  the  particular  moment  in  this  House,  it  is  impossible  to 
believe  the  sense  of  Great  Britain,  or  the  sense  of  Ame- 
rica, can  go  to  the  punishing  a  particular  town,  for  resisting 
the  payment  of  the  Tea  Tax,  which  is  universally  odious 
throughout  America,  and  is  held  in  ridicule  and  contempt 
by  every  thinking  man  in  this  country.  The  question  of 
taxing  America  is  sufficiently  nice  to  palliate  resistance, 
if  the  subject  had  never  been  litigated  in  this  country ;  but 
after  the  highest  characters  in  this  State  had  declared 
against  the  right  of  this  country  to  impose  taxes  on  Ame- 
rica, for  the  purpose  of  revenue  ;  after  the  general  voice  of 
the  Senate  had  concurred  in  repealing  the  Stamp  Act, 
upon  that  jyinciple ;  after  those  men,  who  had  maintained 
these  doctrines,  had  been  promoted  by  his  Majesty  to  the 
fii-st  stations  in  the  administration  of  civil  and  judicial 
affairs,  there  is  so  much  mitigation  to  be  pleaded  in  favor 
of  the  Americans  from  those  circumstances  (allowing  them 
in  an  error  at  present)  that  every  man  nmst  feel  the  height 
of  cruelty,  by  enforcing  contrary  maxims,  with  any  degree 
of  severity,  at  first,  before  due  warning  is  given. 

It  is  in  vain  to  say  Boston  is  more  culpable  than  the 
other  Colonies.  Sending  the  ships  from  thence,  and  obliging 
them  to  return  to  England,  is  a  more  solemn  and  deli- 
berated act  of  resistance  than  the  outrage  committed  by 
persons  in  disguise  in  the  night,  when  the  ship  refused  to 
depart.  That  of  blocking  up  the  harbour  of  Boston,  to  pre- 
vent the  importation  of  British  manufactures,  or  the  expor- 
tation of  goods,  which  are  to  pay  for  them,  is  a  mea- 
sure equally  as  absurd  as  if  the  Parliament  here,  upon 
the  resistance  which  was  made  to  their  resolution,  by  the 
riots  at  Brentford,  and  other  disturbances  in  the  county 
o{ Middlesex,  had  decreed  by  way  of  punishment,  that  the 
freeholders  should  have  been  prohibited  from  sowing  of 
wheat.  For  whose  benefit  do  the  inliabitants  of  Boston  toil 
and  labour  ?  The  springs  in  the  circle  of  commerce  bear  so 
nicely  on  each  other,  that  few  men  can  tell  by  interruptinn 
one,  the  degree  and  extent  to  which  the  rest  may  he 
exposed.  By  excluding  the  importation  of  molasses,  and 
the  exportation  of  that  spirit  which  is  distilled  at  Boston, 
the  whole  Guinea  trade  will  be  affected,  and  in  conse- 
quence, the  sugar  trade,  that  depends  upon  it.  In  extending 
this  kind  of  punisliment  to  the  other  Colonies,  every  one 
must  see  the  danger  ;  and  yet,  if  it  can  be  approved  for  one, 
the  same  arguments  will  hold  good  to  approve  or  reject  it 


JOT 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


56 


respecting  tlie  other  ;  but  let  any  man  fisure  to  himself  the 
consequences  to  this  country,  if  a  similar  punishment  was 
applied  to  the  Colony  of  Virginia  ;  £300.000  a  year  dimi- 
nution in  revenue,  besides  the  loss  of  all  the  foreiiin  contracts, 
and  perliaps  of  that  beneticial  trade  forever.  Notwithstand- 
ing the  general  approbation  which  has  been  given  to  this 
Bill,  ancrthe  loud  a])plauses  which  have  been  re-tfchoed  to 
every  word  of  the  noble  lyord  in  explaining  it,  yet  no  man 
will  be  bold  enough  to  say,  thai  this  partial  pimisinnent  is  a 
remcdv  for  the  general  disease.  And  yet  without  knowing 
what  is  to  follow,  no  man  can  be  vindicated  (oven  supposing 
the  Bill  right  in  |)art)  for  giving  his  assent  to  it.  Those 
gentlemen  who  are  in  the  secrets  of  the  Cabinet,  and 
know  how  assuredly  every  proposition  from  them  is  adopted 
by  this  House,  may  be  excused  for  their  sanguine  accla- 
mations in  favour  of  the  measure,  but  the  general  mass,  who 
must  be  equally  ignorant  with  myself,  of  what  is  to  follow, 
can  have  no  excuse  for  giving  their  assent  so  readily  for  pun- 
ishing their  fellow  subjects  in  so  unprecedented  a  manner, 
and  their  eager  zeal  serves  only  to  shew  how  ready  they 
are  to  obey  the  will  of  another,  without  exercising  their 
own  judgment  in  the  case.  If  the  Government  of  this 
country  is  resisted  in  America,  my  opinion  is,  instead  of 
removing  the  seat  of  Government  in  the  Colony,  and  forc- 
ing the  elements  to  bend  to  our  will,  (which  is  impossible) 
that  an  effectual  force  should  be  carried  to  the  heart  of  the 
Colony  resisting,  to  crush  rebellion  in  the  bud,  before  a 
General  Confederacy  can  be  formed.  In  the  present  case 
we  abandon  the  Government,  and  drive  the  inhabitants  to 
despair,  leaving  the  multitude  a  prey  to  any  ambitious  s])irit 
that  may  arise.  For  my  own  part,  I  am  convinced,  from 
experience  in  the  Colonies,  that  good  Government  may  be 
conducted  there  upon  rational  grounds,  as  well  as  in  this 
country  ;  but  the  ])ower  and  means  of  governing,  rewards 
and  punishments,  are  taken  from  your  supreme  executive' 
Magistrate  in  every  sense,  and  then  you  are  surprised  that 
all  order  and  obedience  should  cease.  The  Colonies  can  only 
be  governed  by  their  Assemblies,  as  England  by  the  House 
of  Commons ;  the  Patent  Oftices,  as  well  as  those  in  the 
Customs,  which  were  formerly  given  at  the  recommendation 
of  the  Governors,  to  men  supporting  Government,  and  resi- 
ding in  tiie  Provinces,  are  now  in  reversion  three  or  four  lives 
deep,  to  men  living  in  this  country.  The  command  of  the 
military,  which  was  another  gi'eat  source  of  respect  and 
obedience,  is  likew  ise  taken  from  the  Governor :  so  that  in 
truth  he  remains  an  insignificant  jjageant  of  state,  fit  only 
to  transmit  tedious  accounts  of  his  own  ridiculous  situation  : 
or,  like  a  Doctor  of  the  Sorbonne,  to  debate  with  his 
Assembly  about  abstract  doctrines  in  Government. 

I  am  far  from  wishing  to  throw  any  blame  on  Governor 
Hutchinson,  or  to  condemn  him,  like  the  town  of  Boston, 
unheard.  The  absence  of  the  man  and  the  general  clamour 
against  him,  will  restrain  me  from  saying  many  things 
respecting  his  conduct,  which  appear  reprehensible  ;  but  1 
cannot  admit  a  passage  in  the  speech  of  a  noble  Lord  to 
pass  unnoticed.  His  Ijordship  alleges, "  That  the  Governor 
"  could  not  apply  to  the  Admiral  in  the  harbour,  or  to  the 
•''  Commanding  Officer  of  the  troops  in  the  castle,  for  the 
•'  protection  of  the  custom-house  officers,  as  well  as  teas  in 
••'  question,  without  the  advice  of  his  Council."  But  I  beg 
leave  to  inform  the  noble  Lord,  as  I  served  in  that  station 
myself,  that  there  is  a  volume  of  instructions  to  every  Go- 
vernor on  this  subject,  whereby  he  is  commanded  under  the 
severest  penalties,  "  To  give  all  kind  of  protection  to  trade 
••'  andconmierce,  as  well  as  to  the  officers  of  his  Majesty's 
•'  Customs,  by  his  own  authority,  without  the  necessity 
••'  of  acting  throui;li  his  Council."  Nor  can  I  conceive  a 
passible  excuse  for  ihe  destruction  of  those  teas,  while  two 
men-of-war  lay  iu  the  harbour,  without  the  least  application 
having  been  made  to  the  Admiral  for  protection,  during  so 
long  a  transaction. 

The  fij-st  essential  point  in  those  disputes  which  are  now 
likely  to  become  so  serious  by  the  weakness  of  Adminis- 
tration, in  tills  country,  in  followin!,'  no  connected  plan, 
either  of  force  or  of  favour,  but  constantly  vibrating  between 
the  two,  is  to  put  ourselves  in  the  riglu,  and  for  this  j)ur- 
ix).se  I  would  reconnnend  the  innnediate  repeal  of  the  Tea 
Duty,  which  can  be  vindicated  upon  no  principles,  either  of 
commerce  or  policy.  Men  may  allege  this  would  be  giving 
up  the  point ;  but  if  we  have  no  better  points  to  dispute 
uj)on.  I  am  ready  to  yield  the  argument.     Raisin"  taxes 


in  America  for  the  purpose  of  revenue,  I  maintain  to  be 
unnecessary  and  dangerous.  A  Stamp  Act,  as  a  measure  of 
police,  varied  for  the  difTerent  Governments,  and  leaving 
the  revenue  raised  thereby  to  be  appropriated  by  the  respec- 
tive Legislatures,  I  hold  to  be  a  measure  of  the  highest  effi- 
cacy, for  maintaining  a  due  obedience  to  the  authority  of  this 
country,  and  prolonging  that  ilependence  for  ages  to  come. 
How  far  it  can  be  executed,  alter  what  has  already  passed, 
I  am  rather  diffident,  but  of  this  I  am  certain,  that  in  case 
Great  Britain  is  dejirived  of  excr.uting  a  measure  of  that 
nature,  which  by  pervading  every  transaction,  secures  the 
execution  in  itself,  she  has  lost  one  of  the  greatest  enijines 
for  supporting  her  influence  throughout  the  Enqiire  without 
oppression.  Some  men  who  are  for  simplifyin<r  Government 
to  their  own  comprehensions,  will  not  allow  they  conceive 
that  the  supreme  legislative  authority  shall  not  be  para- 
mount in  all  things,  and  taxation  being  fullv  comprehended 
in  legislation,  they  argue,  that  the  power  of  the  one  nuist 
necessarily  follow  that  of  the  otiier;  and  yet  we  find  man- 
kind possessed  of  privileges  which  are  not  to  he  violated 
in  the  most  arbitrary  countries.  The  Province  of  Langue- 
doc  is  a  striking  example  in  refutation  of  the  doctrines  res- 
pecting taxation,  which  are  held  by  such  narrow  observers. 
The  Kingdom  of  Ireland  in  another  instance  in  our  domin- 
ions. There  is  not  one  argument  which  can  apply  for 
exempting  Ireland  from  taxation  by  the  Parliament  of 
Great  Britain,  that  does  not  equally  protect  the  Colonies 
from  the  power  of  such  partial  judges.  Every  man  should 
now  call  to  his  remembrance  by  w  hat  obstinate  infatuation 
Philip  n,  came  to  lose  the  L^nited  Provinces.  Can  it  be 
supposed  that  in  a  nation  so  wise  as  Spain  was  at  that 
time,  that  no  man  perceived  the  injustice  and  futility  of 
the  measure  in  dispute  ?  But  I  can  easily  suppose,  from 
the  pride  of  authority,  where  our  vanity  is  so  much  flatter- 
ed, that  no  man  durst  venture  a  proposition  for  receding 
from  that  cruel  measure,  after  it  had  been  resisted  by 
violence. 

These  arc  the  general  heads. 

The  particular  objections  to  the  Bill  arc,  fii-st  for  con- 
tinuing the  punishment,  "  until  satisfliction  shall  be  made 
'•  to  the  India  Company,"  without  stating  the  amount,  or 
what  that  satisfaction  sliall  be.  Next,  "  until  peace  and 
"  good  order  shall  be  certified  to  be  restored,"  when  it  is 
impossible,  as  to  the  subject  in  dispute,  that  such  certificate 
can  ever  be  granted,  because  the  custom-house  officers  are 
removed,  and  all  trade  and  commerce  prohibited.  The 
numerous  disputes  and  litigations  which  nmst  necessarily 
arise  in  carrying  this  law  into  execution,  on  contract 
made  by  parties  before  they  could  be  apprized  of  it,  and 
the  despatch  of  ships  in  harbour,  under  the  limited  time, 
without  any  exception  for  the  desertion  of  seamen,  or 
wind  and  weather,  is  altogether  melancholy  to  consider ! 
The  power  given  to  the  Admiral  or  Chief  Commander,  to 
order  the  ships  returning  lioni  foreign  voyages,  to  such 
stations  as  he  shall  direct,  is  wild,  vexatious,  and  indefinite.. 
That  of  permitting  his  Majesty  to  alter  the  value  of  all 
the  property  in  the  town  of  Boston,  upon  restoring  the 
port,  by  aflixing  such  quays  and  wharfs  as  he  only  shall 
appoint,  for  landing  and  shipping  of  goods,  is  liable  to 
such  misreprasentation  and  abuse,  that  I  expect  to  see 
every  evil  follow  the  exercise  of  it,  and  it  must  create 
infinite  jealousies  and  distraction  among  the  People. 

I  am  therefore  of  opinion,  that  this  Bill,  both  from  the 
principle  and  manner  in  which  it  has  been  passed,  and 
from  forelTjnning  the  general  regulations  that  are  intend- 
ed, and  which  ought  at  least  to  accompany  it,  instead 
of  quieting  the  disturbances  in  Boston,  it  will  promote 
them  still  further,  and  induce  the  inhabitants  to  cut  ofT 
all  communication  with  your  ships  of  war,  which  may  be 
productive  of  mutual  hostilities,  and  most  probably  will 
end  in  a  general  revolt.* 

•  To  ihe  Printer  of  the  Nortolk  Intelligencer. 
Remarks  on  Governor  Johnstone's  Speech  in  the  House  of  Commons. 
Sir: — Political  debates,  from  tlio  misguided  rafje  of  the  Speakers, 
often  rise  to  an  enormous  height ;  indeed,  it  requires  a  long  course  of 
exi)erience  to  determine  tlic  real  interest  of  the  State  in  every  impor. 
tant  point  that  occurs.  The  loudest  cavillers  against  the  measures  of 
Government  after  running  their  splendid  career,  become  lordly  efB. 
gies  of  .State,  and  exhibit  a  striking  portrait  of  the  complexion  of  the 
tim<s.  In  the  British  annals,  the  transformation  of  violent  zealots  for 
public  liberty  into  its  most  inveterate  enemies,  clearly  proves  that  tlie 
gilded  top  fur  which  ambition  panta,  has  an  irresistible  attraction ; 


57 


BOSTON  PORT  BILI.. 


58 


Mr.  Saicbrid^c  said,  lie  rose  again,  just  to  blame  the 
Minister  for  beinj;  timid  in  doing  his  duty  without  the  au- 
thority of  Parliament.  He  was  very  certain,  he  said,  that 
there'  were  three  thini!;s  in  the  Bill ;  that  there  was  this, 
and  this,  an<i  this  things  which  the  Minister  might  have 
done  without  skulking  behind  the  Legislative  authority  for 
shelter;  that  indeed  the  fourth,  of  stopping  up  their  port, 
he  believed  it  was  proper  to  apply  to  Parhanient  for ;  but 
he  was  very  certain  that  this,  and  this,  and  this,  might  have 
been  done  without  the  aid  of  Parliament. 

Lord  North.  Sir,  1  have  been  formerly  blamed  for  being 
the  onlv  ostensible  Minister  of  this  country.  1  am  now 
charged  with  not  coming  forth  and  doing  the  duty  of  an 
acting  Minister  without  applying  to  Parliament.  1  never. 
Sir,  am  ashamed  to  have  the  sanction  and  direction  of  Par- 
liament as  the  rule  and  guide  of  my  conduct ;  but.  Sir,  if  I 
had  done,  as  the  honorable  gentleman  who  spoke  last, 
wishes  me  to  have  done,  this,  and  this,  and  this,  I  had  done 
nothing,  unless  1  had  come  to  Parliament  forthat.  and  that, 
then  the  main  object,  what  the  honorable  gentleman  thinks 
I  ought  to  have  come  to  Parliament  for,  and  without  that, 
he  allows  I  should  do  nothing  ;  but  however  he  may  wish 
nie  to  have  done  this,  and  this,  and  this,  of  my  own  head  as 
a  IMinister,  the  honorable  gentleman,  (fond  as  he  is,  and 
always  has  been,  of  prerogative,)  would  have  disagreed  to 
my  proceeding,  and  objected  against  it. 

The  Bill  was  then  Passed  without  a  division. 


HOUSE  OF  LORDS. 

Saturday,  March  26,  1774. 

A  ^^essage  was  brought  up  from  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, by  Mr.  Cooper,  and  others. 

With  a  Bill  intituled,  "  An  Act  to  discontinue,  in  such 

but  the  douceurs  of  the  Court  have  been  dealt  witli  so  cautious  a  hand 
of  lute,  and  so  accurate  an  iuspaction  into  the  meritsof  the  candidates, 
that  miiny  officious  pretenders  liave  retired  into  the  vale  of  discontent, 
dispirited,  unbctViended,  and  defeated;  common  observers  do  not 
readily  trace  tlio  various  transactions  and  refinements  which  the  pa- 
triotic character  undergoes  before  it  can  be  ripened  into ,  modern 
maturity ;  a  retrospect  into  certain  promotions  will  confirm  the  truth 
of  this  assertion,  and  it  is  as  demonstrable  to  the  full,  that  the  twinges 
of  the  political  gout  are  as  severe  and  incurable  as  the  corporal. 

I  shall  now,  !Sir,  with  steady  attention  garble  those  passages  in  the 
honorable  gcntleman^s  speech,  which  never  would  have  attracted  my 
notice,  but  for  the  influence  it  seems  to  have  had  over  the  minds  of 
some  very  narrow  connoisseurs  here.  It  is  with  the  strictest  deference 
to  the  sago  politicians  in  this  part  of  the  world,  that  I  offer  a  few  re- 
marks. I  will  then  first  warn  those  who  entertain  so  high  an  opinion 
of  it,  to  weigh  maturely  the  arguments  it  contains;  they  will  then 
find  otlicr  doctrines  blended  with  those  they  so  warmly  adopt,  rather 
unfavourable  to  the  sticklers  for  a  commonwealth.  The  elegant 
modesty  of  his  exordium  would  have  merited  applause,  had  we  not 
discerned  its  excessive  decline  through  the  whole  course  of  the  debate. 
He  is  not  unacquainted  with  the  elaborate  logic  of  the  ancients,  nor 
insensible  that  eloquence  on  all  subjects,  has  strong  pretensions  to 
lit'.'rary  ebteem,  for  he  aims  at  profound  sagacity  in  developing  the 
principles  of  moral  philosophy. 

"  I  now  venture  to  predict  to  this  House,  that  the  effeot  of  the  pre, 
"sent  Bill  nmst  be  productive  of  a  General  Confederacy  to  resist  the 
"  pow'-T  of  this  county.  It  is  irritating,  tempting,  nay  !  inviting  men 
"  to  those  deeds  by  ineft'ectual  expedients,  the  abortions  of  an  undo, 
"eisive  mind,  incapable  of  comprehending  the  chain  of  consequences 
"  wliioh  must  result  from  such  a  law.  I  am  not  one  of  those,  who 
"  believe  that  distant  Provinces  can  be  retained  in  their  duty,  by 
"preaching  or  encliantnients;  I  believe  that  force  or  power,  con. 
"ducted  with  wisdom,  are  tlie  means  of  securing  regular  obedience 
"  under  every  establishment;  but  that  sucli  force  should  never  be  ap. 
"plied  to  any  degree  of  rigour,  unless  it  shall  carry  the  general  ap. 
"probation  of  mankind  in  the  execution." 

If  the  melancholy  prospect  of  affairs,  heightened  by  alarms  from 
the  Iniliiins  on  the  frontiers,  presents  to  our  view,  evident  symptoms 
of  commercial  decline  here,  whicli  is  the  greatest  mart  for  trade  in  the 
Colony;  I  cannot  imagine,  that  tliinking  men  would  be  so  mad,  as 
to  form  a  general  revolt.  If  courts  of  justice  agree  to  annihilate 
themselves,  it  nmst  bo  wholly,  cannot  bo  conditionally.  Can  this  con- 
sist with  the  loyalty  and  good  manners  we  profess  for  the  Prince,  or 
that  virtuous  fortitude  which  combines  society  in  an  indissoluble 
union?  Can  acts  of  injustice  obtain  the  sanction  of  unanimous  con- 
DOtkt?  How  ibstracted  and  refined  is  the  gentleman's  reasoning,  to 
anticipate  the  general  approbation  of  mankind,  as  if  in  an  ingenious 
combination  of  speculalivo  sentiments,  could  destroy  tliat  dispensing 
power  which  is  the  iiKister-wheel,  or  that  discerning  policy  whicli  is 
ijitcrwoven  in  the  frame  of  all  Governments.     He  goes  on — ■ 

"  But  aft"r  the  highest  characters  iu  the  State  had  d.clared  against 
"the  right  ofthis  coimtry,  to  impose  taxes  on  Aiiifrica  for  the  purpose 
"of  raising  a  revenue;  after  the  general  voice  of  the  Senate  had  con- 
"curred  in  repealing  the  Stamp  Act,  upon  that  principle,  after  tliose 
'  "men  who  had  maintained  these  doctrines  had  been  promoted  by  his 
"  Majesty,  to  the  first  stations  in  the  administration  ol'  civil  and  judi- 
"cial  air.tirs  ;  there  is  much  mitigation  to  bo  pleaded  in  favour  of  the 
"  An}eriea7iii  Irom  those  circumstances,  (allowing  them  in  an  error  at 
"present,)  that  every  man  must  feel  the  height  of  cruelty  by  enforc- 


"  manner,  and  for  such  time  as  are  therein  mentioned,  the 
"  landing  and  discharging,  lading  or  shipping,  of  goods,. 
"  wares,  or  merchandise,  at  the  town,  and  within  the  har- 
"  hour  of  Boston,  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
"  in  North  America ;"  to  which  they  desire  the  concurrence 
ofthis  House. 

The  said  Bill  was  read  the  first  time  : 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  be  read  a  second  time,  on 
Monday  next,  and  the  Lords  be  summoned. 

Monday,  March  28,  1774. 

The  Lord  Wycombe  jiresented  to  the  House,  the  fol- 
lowing Petition  of  Stephen  Sayer,  and  others,  Natives  of 
America ; 

The  same  was  read  by  tlie  Clerk,  as  follows  : 

To  the  Right  Honorable  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Tem- 
poral, in  Parliament  assembled,  the  humble  Petition  oj 
several  Natives  of  America,  showeih  : 

That  your  Petitioners,  being  Natives  of  his  Majesty's 
Dominions  in  America,  are  deeply  interested  in  every  pro- 
ceeding of  this  right  honorable  House,  which  touches  the 
life,  liberty,  or  property,  of  any  person  or  persons  in  the 
said  Dominions. 

That  your  Petitioners  conceive  themselves  and  their  fel- 
low subjects  to  be  entitled  to  the  rights  of  natural  justice, 
and  to  the  common  law  of  England,  as  their  unalienable 
birthright ;  that  they  apprehend  it  to  be  an  invariable  rule 
of  natural  justice,  that  no  man  shall  be  condemned  unheard  ; 
and  that,  according  to  law,  no  person  or  persons  can  be 
judged  without  being  called  upon  to  answer,  and  being  per- 
mitted to  hear  the  evidence  against  them,  and  to  make  their 
defence. 

That  it  is  therefore  with  the  deepest  concern,  they  un- 
derstand that  there  is  now  before  this  right  honorable 
House,  a  Bill  of  Pains  and  Penalties,  to  be  inflicted  on  the 

"ing  maxims  with  any  degree  of  severity  at  first,  before  due  warning 
"is  given." 

When  men  grow  adepts  in  the  theory  of  rebellion,  and  form  BC-hemea 
to  emancipate  themselves  from  the  control  of  the  laws ;  when  they 
consider  all  requisitions  from  Britain,  as  unjust,  all  acts  of  Parlia. 
ment  as  tyrannical,  the  mode  of  punishment  must  be  extraordinary; 
the  levy  of  one  pound  irritates  as  much  as  one  thousand  ;  and  as  to 
the  conduct  of  certain  members  in  the  House  of  Commons,  I  cannot 
think  their  principles  impeachable,  who  advise  the  promotion  of  the 
patriotic  zealots,  if  their  preferment  could  restore  the  peace  and  har- 
mony of  the  State.  I  do  not  mean  to  impeach  the  member's  know- 
ledge of  agriculture ;  yet,  I  think  the  comparison  relative  to  sewing 
wheat  bears  a  very  far-fetched  analogy  to  the  Bustonians  punishment. 
Most  of  the  remarks  relative  to  the  event  of  the  Act,  are  too  vague  to 
aftord  any  insight  to  the  most  prying  observer.  How  are  the  People 
to  cloth  and  support  themselves  during  the  execution  of  his  Quixotte 
schemes  ?  He  is  confounded  in  his  own  ingenious  doubts,  and  leaves 
the  arduous  task  of  unravelling  all  to  the  good  natured  world.  But  what 
gleams  of  consolation  do  tiiey  derive  from  the  following  assertions  : 
"  If  the  Government  of  this  country  is  resisted  in  America,  my 
"  opinion  is,  instead  of  removing  the  seat  of  Government  iu  the  Colo- 
"ny,  and  forcing  the  elements  to  bend  to  our  will,  (which  is  impossi- 
"ble,)  that  an  etfeotual  force  should  be  carried  to  the  heart  of  the 
"Colony  resisting,  to  crush  rebellion  in  the  bud,  before  a  General  Con, 
"  federacy  can  be  formed."  So  that  you  aec  this  great  man  is  not  an 
invincible  proselyte  to  moderate  measures,  but  would  chastise  in  cases 
of  urgent  necessity. 

Can  tumultuous  meetings  remedy  the  defects  of  law  ?  Is  there  not  a 
discretionary  power  in  the  civil  police  to  summon  the  posse  comitatus  .'* 
Has  it  not  been  deemod  strictly  legal  in  Britain,  to  strengthen  that 
body  by  military  aid,  on  great  emergencies  ?  But  when  men,  in  high 
offices  of  civil  trust,  connived  at  the  base  resolves  of  an  immaculate 
body  of  select  citizens ;  the  Governor  could  not  consistently  with  his 
duty  interfere,  without  infringing  those  rights  they  pretended  they 
met  to  secure  ;  had  he  taken  any  steps  at  all,  he  must  have  suppressed 
the  whole  meeting;  and  their  heart-felt  groans  for  expiring  liberty 
would  have  re-echoed  to  the  inmost  recess  of  his  jialace.  His  inter- 
position would  not  have  been  official,  and  they  never  would  have  al- 
lowed the  greatness  of  the  emergency  to  supersede  the  force  of  their 
chartered  rights.  His  reasons  for  repealing  the  Tea  Duty,  are  ex- 
ceedingly futile ;  he  thinks  it  cannot  be  vindicated ;  a  dogmatical  as- 
sertion, of  a  similar  stamp  and  spirit  with  the  rest.  His  remarks  upon 
inherent  privileges  are  ridiculous.  Can  any  charter  grant  destroy  the 
fabric  of  that  Government  which  gave  it  birth ;  at  any  rate,  the  pre. 
cedent  would  bo  far  more  ignominious  for  Great  Britain  to  yield  to 
America,  than  America  to  testify  her  allegiance  to  Britain.  The  disputes 
and  litigations  which  the  Bostonians  have  brought  upon  themselves, 
they  must  abide  by  the  consequences  of.  They  have  baffled  the  expedi- 
ency of  the  wisest  laws  ;  such  crimes  are  heinous,  and  richly  deserve 
capital  punishment.  If  the  People  of  Boston  act  with  discretion,  they 
may  receive  continual  improvements  in  trade  ;  let  them  comply  in 
time,  and  earnestly  seize  this  grand  criterion,  to  distinguish  their  real, 
from  their  pretended  friends,  and  the  happy  consequences  resulting 
from  such  a  timely  avowal  of  their  allegiance,  and  cemented  by  the 
constant  practice  of  virtue  and  good  manners,  will  discover  a  firm  zeal 
for  their  Prince,  a  virtuous  fortitude  in  themselves,  and  be  an  eternal 
memorial  of  that  discerning  policy  which  is  the  essential  character 
ifltic  of  a  free  and  loyal  People.  OB.'SERVA.TOR. 

Norfolk  Borough,  June  30/A.  1774. 


59 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


60 


town  of  Boston,  for  a  trespass,  committed  by  some  persons 
unknown,  upon  the  property  of  the  ImsI  India  Company, 
without  tlic  said  town  havin<;  been  apprized  of  any  accusa- 
tion being  brou!;lit  ai;ainst  tiiem,  or  permitted  to  hear  the 
evidence,  if  tlierc  be  any,  and  to  maiie  llieir  defence. 

Tliat  the  Bill  takes  away  immecrialely  from  the  inhabi- 
tants of  the  town,  the  use  of  property,  to  the  amount  of 
several  hundred  thousand  pounds,  vested  in  quays,  wharfs, 
stores,  8ic.  Tiiat  it  will  restrain  many  thousands  of  his 
Majesty's  subjects  from  subsistlnir  tliemsehes  and  tiieir 
liimilies,  by  their  usual  employments  :  that  it  w  ill  punisli  llio 
innocent  for  the  ;:uilty  ;  and  even  should  all  the  reparation 
r(;fjuired  by  the  Bill  be  made,  the  restoration  of  that  pro- 
jierty,  or  any  part  of  it,  is  suffered  to  depend  solely  upon 
ijie  will  of  the  Crown. 

1  our  Petitioners  conceive  such  proceeding  to  be  directly 
ropuijnant  to  every  jirinciple  of  law  and  justice  :  and  that 
under  such  a  precedent,  no  man.  or  body  of  men.  could 
I'ujoy  a  moment's  security;  for  if  judgment  be  immediately 
10  follow  an  accusation,  the  accused,  unacquainted  with  the 
charge,  and  debarred  from  defenfling  themselves,  every 
fence  against  liilse  accusation  will  be  pulled  down,  justice 
will  no  longer  be  a  shield,  nor  innocence  an  exenq)iion 
from  punishment. 

Your  Petitioners  beg  leave  to  represent,  that  the  law  in 
America,  ministers  redress  for  any  injury  sustained  there  ; 
and  they  can  most  tmly  affirm,  that  it  is  administered  in 
that  country  with  as  much  iiiq)artiality,  as  in  any  other  part 
of  his  Majesty's  Dominions.  In  proof  of  this,  tliey  appeal 
to  an  instance  oi  great  notoriety,  in  which,  under  every  cir- 
cumstance that  could  exasperate  the  People,  and  disturb 
the  course  of  justice,  Captain  Fnston  and  his  soldiers  had 
a  fair  trial,  and  a  favourable  \erdict.  The  due  course  of 
law  thus  manifestly  holding  out  redress,  they  cannot  but 
(consider  the  interposition  of  Parliamentary  power  to  be  its 
imnecessary,  as  it  is  arbitrary  and  unjust. 

Your  Petitioners  conceive,  that  this  right  honorable 
House,  being  the  supreme  judicature  of  this  A'ation,  are  too 
well  acquainted  with  the  inviolable  rules  of  justice,  to  re- 
ifiire  any  further  objections  to  the  Bill  against  the  town  of 
Boston,  now  under  consideration. 

They  therefore  trust  and  pray,  that  this  right  honorable 
House  will  not  pass  a  Bill,  which  is  to  condenui  and  punish 
jjersons  unheard,  and  therefore  deprived  of  that  privilege, 
which  every  principle  of  justice,  and  every  practice  of  law, 
allows  to  the  meanest  individual :  the  privilege  of  hearing 
and  controverting  the  evidence  against  liim,  and  maintain- 
ing his  innocence. 

And  your  Petitioners,  as  in  duty  bound,  shall  ever  pray. 
Signed, 
Stephen  Saycr,  John  Peronncau, 

IVilliam  Lee,  Peeke  Fuller, 

Benjamin  Franklin.         E'lward  Fenicicke, 
fVilliam  Middlcton,  IViUinm  Middleto,'.,  Jim. 

Henry  Laurence,  Th'imas  Finckney, 

Ralph  Jzard,  William  Hascl  Gihhs, 

Isaac  Motte,  Thomas  Bromfteld, 

John  Ellis,  Joshua  Johnston, 

Hugh  Williamson,  John  Hobson, 

Thomas  Barker,  Daniel  Bowley, 

John  Boylston,  John  Allci/nc, 

Arthur  Lee,  fFilliam  Blake, 

Thomas  Ruston,  John  Ballendine, 

Philip  Neyle,  J.  Williams. 

Edward  Bancroft, 
Ordered,  That  the  said  Petition  do  lie  on  the  table. 

The  order  of  die  day  being  read,  for  taking  into  con- 
sideration the  several  Papers  laid  before  this  House,  (by  his 
Majesty's  command,)  relating  to  Disturbances  in  America  ; 
and  also  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message  in  relation 
thereto;  and  for  the  Lords  to  be  summoned  : 

And  the  said  Papers  were  accordingly  read  by  the 
Clerk. 

Then  the  order  of  the  day  being  read,  for  the  second 
reading  of  the  Bill,  and  for  the  Lords  to  be  summoned  : 

Tiie  said  Bill  was  accordingly  read  the  second  time. 

It  was  moved  ■'  to  commit  the  Bill,"  which  being  ob- 
jected to ; 

After  long  debate,  the  question  was  put  thereon  ?  It  was 
resolved  in  the  .\ffinnative. 


Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  be  committed  to  a  Com- 
mittee of  the  whole  House. 

Ordered,  That  the  House  be  put  into  a  Committee 
upon  the  said  Bill  to-morrow,  and  the  Ix>rds  be  sum- 
moned. 

Tuesday,  March  29,   1774. 

Tlie  order  of  the  day  lieing  read,  the  House  was  put 
into  a  Committee  of  the  whole,  upon  the  Bill. 

The  Bill  was  supported  by  the  l^ords  Mansfield,  Goiaer, 
Littleton,  fVeymuuth,  and  Suffolk:  it  was  opposed  by  the 
Dukes  of  Richmond,  and  Manchester,  the  Marquis  of 
Rockisisrham,  and  the  Lords  Temple,  Shelburne,  Camden, 
and  Stair;  but  the  principal  arguments  were  between  the 
Lords  Mansfield  and  Camden. 

After  some  time,  the  House  was  resumed : 

And  the  Lord  Boston  reported  from  the  Committee, 
•'  Thai  they  had  gone  through  the  Bill,  and  directed  him  to 
"  report  the  same  to  the  House,  without  anv  amendment.' 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  he  read  a  third  time  to- 
morrow, and  that  the  Lords  be  summoned. 

Wednesday,  March  30,   1774. 

The  Earl  of  Stair  presented  to  the  House  a  Petition  of 
William  Bollan,  Esq.,  Agent  for  the  Council  oi'  the  Pro- 
vince of  Massachusetts  Bay. 

The  same  was  read  by  the  Clerk  as  follow  s : 

To  the  Right  Honorable  the  Lords  Spiritual  and  Tempo- 
ral, in  Parliament  assembled,  the  Petition  of  William 
Bollan,  Esq.,  Agent  for  the  Council  of  the  Frovinn:  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  most  humbly  shoieeth  : 

That  the  "  Bill  for  the  immediate  removal  of  the  oflicers 
"  concerned  in  the  collection  and  management  of  his  Ma- 
"  jesty's  duties  of  Customs,  from  the  town  of  Boston,  in  the 
''  Province  oi  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  America ;  and  to 
'■  discontinue  tlie  landing,  discharging,  lading,  and  shipping, 
"  of  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  at  the  said  town  of 
"  Boston,  or  within  the  harbour  thereof,"  at  present  depcnc'- 
ing  under  consideration  of  this  right  honorable  House,  con- 
tains various  provisions  proposed  to  be  enacted,  inconsistent 
with  the  ancient  and  just  rights,  lawful  possessions,  usual 
comforts  of  life,  and  common  social  benefits,  with  other  im- 
portant interests  of  the  Petitioner's  constituents,  long  lield 
ill  amicable  conjunction  with  other  inhabitants  of  Boston, 
and  the  Province,  and  the  other  Colonies,  and  the  most  de- 
sirable connection  with  innumerable  persons  employed  in 
manufactures,  trade,  and  navigation,  in  Great  Britain, 
whereby  they  have  been  well  maintained,  and  praspered  ; 
and  moreover,  with  the  general  circulation  of  American 
commerce,  from  which  so  great  benefits  are  dailv  recei\ed 
by  this  Kingdom,  in  various  ways. 

That  the  merchants  of  Boston  were  not  jiartakers  of  the 
offence  committed  in  the  iate  destruction  of  the  tea  there, 
nor  of  any  other  act  of  violence  ;  nevertheless,  if  the  present 
Bill  be  enacted,  they  will  become  the  chief  sufferers,  totje- 
ther  with  numerous  British  merchants  and  manufacturers. 

Wherefore  your  Lordships  Petitioner  humbly  prays 
that  he  may  be  heard  before  this  riglit  honorable  House,  in 
order  to  prevent  these  provisions  from  passing  to  be  enacted. 

W.  Bollan. 

Which  done, 

The  said  Mr.  Bollan  was  called  in,  and  heard  at  the  bar, 
against  the  said  Bill.' 

He  is  directed  to  withdraw.  Then  the  said  Bill  was 
read   the  third  time. 

The  question  was  put,  "  whether  this  Bill  shall  Pass  r " 
It  was  resolved  in  the  Affirmative,  Ncmine  Disscntientc. 

Thursday,  7V/«rc/i  31,   1774. 

His  Majesty  being  seated  on  the  Throne,  adorned  with 
his  Crown  and  reiral  ornaments,  and  attended  bv  his  offi- 
cers of  State,  (the  Lords  being  in  their  robes,)  the  Com- 
mons with  their  Speaker,  attending;  the  Royal  assent  was 
pronounced  severally,  by  the  Clerk's  Assistant,  to  thirty- 
nine  Bills,  beginning  with  the  Boston  Port  Bill. 

The  following  Petition  of  the  IVatives  of  America,  then 
in  London,  was  presented  to  the  King,  on  the  nioming 
of  the  3l9l  of  March,  before  he  went  to  the  House 
of  Ixirds : 


61 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


«t 


7'o  the  King's  iiiost  excellent  Mnje.sti/.  the  humble  Peti- 
tion  of  several  Natives  of  America,  shoireih  : 

That  your  Majesty's  Petitioners  are  natives  of  your  Do- 
minions in  America,  and  Ijear  most  true  and  cordial  alle- 
•rianoe  to  your  Majesty's  Royal  person  and  family. 

Tliat  allei!;iance  and  protection  bein!,^  reci])rocal,  your 
Petitioners  look  up  to  your  Majesty  for  protection  under 
the  common  law  of  tiie  land,  which  is  their  birth-right. 

That,  according  to  law,  no  man  can  be  condemned  to 
punislunent  witliout  beini(  called  upon  to  answer,  nor  with- 
out an  opportunity  of  hearing-  the  evidence  ai;ainst  him,  and 
defendintc  his  innocence.  That  in  violation  of  this  law  ,  and 
of  every  principle  of  natural  justice,  a  Bill  is  now  ofiered 
lor  the  Royal  assent,  calculated  to  inflict  pains  and  penal- 
ties, with  unexampled  severity,  upon  your  Majesty's  loyal 
town  of  Boston,  in  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay  ;  the 
said  town  beino;  unap prized  of  the  proceedings,  and  not 
heard  in  its  defence :  that  such  Bill,  if  it  receive  your  Ma- 
jesty's assent,  will  immediately  take  away  from  the  inliabi- 
tants  of  the  town  of  Boston  the  use  of  property  to  the 
amount  of  several  himdred  thousand  pounds,  vested  in 
quays,  wharfs,  store-houses,  &c.  ;  will  restrain  many  thou- 
sands of  your  Majesty's  subjects  from  procuring  subsistence 
for  themselves  and  their  families,  by  their  ordinary  occupa- 
tions ;  may  endanger  the  community,  by  violent  commo- 
tions from  so  many  men  rendered  desperate,  by  being  de- 
prived of  their  daily  bread  ;  and,  \\hat  cannot  but  do  the 
last  violence  to  the  Royal  justice,  will  punish  the  innocent 
for  the  guilty. 

Your  Majesty's  Petitioners  most  humbly  represent,  that 
this  Bill  is  the  more  unjust,  as  the  trespass  it  is  meant  to 
jJunLsh,  has  not  been  prosecuted  in  the  Courts  of  common 
law  in  America,  where  only  according  to  law  and  the  con- 
stitution, it  is  cognizable.  That  the  interposition  of  this 
Bill  is  as  totally  unnecessary  as  the  mode  of  it  is  unjust ; 
because,  your  Majesty's  Courts  in  America,  are  open  to  the 
redress  of  any  injury  sustained  there;  and  justice  is  so  little 
liable  to  perversion,  that  under  every  impression  of  popular 
prejudice.  Captain  Prt/ston  and  others  had,  in  this  your 
Majesty's  Province  of  the  Massachusettt  Bay,  a  fair  trial, 
and  a  favourable  verdict. 

Your  Majesty's  Petitioners  ■  do  therefore  humbly  pray, 
that  your  Majesty  will  be  most  graciously  pleased  to  sus- 
pend your  Royal  assent  to  a  Bill,  calculated  to  condemn 
and  punish  their  countrymen  unheard,  and  fomi  a  prece- 
dent, which  will  take  away  every  securit)  and  protection, 
under  the  law,  from  all  your  Majesty's  subjects  in  America. 

Ajid  your  Petitioners,  as  in  duty  bound,  will  ever  pray. 


William  Lee, 
B.  Franklin, 
John  Ellis, 
H.  Laurence, 
miliam  Blake, 
Robert  Izard, 
Charles  Fuller, 
Isaac  Motte, 
Thomas  Barker, 
William  Middleton, 
Thomas  Ruston, 
Petke  Fuller, 
Joh.  Williams, 
Robert  Izard,  Jun., 
Philip  Neyle, 
J.   F.  Grimkb, 


Walter  Izard, 
Edward  Fenwicke, 
Thomas  Pinckney, 
William  Middleton,  Jun. 
John  Boylstov, 
John  Ballendine, 
John  Ward, 
Jos.  Johnston, 
John  Hobson, 
Daniel  Bowley, 
John  Perronneau, 
Arthur  Lee, 
Joel  Poinsett, 
William  n.  Gibbs, 
James  Marshall. 


Anno  Decimo  Quarto  Georgii  III.  Regis. 

An  Act  to  discontinue  in  ntch  Manner,  and  for  such  Time 
as  are  therein  mentioned,  the  landing  and  discharging, 
lading  or  shipping,  of  Goods,  Wares,  and  Merchandise, 
at  the  Town  and  jvithin  the  Harbour  q/" Boston,  in  the 
Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  America. 

Whereas  dangerous  commotions  and  insurrections  have 
been  fomented  and  raised  in  the  town  of  Boston,  in  the 
Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  Ncu<  England,  by 
divers  ill-afl'ected  persons,  to  the  subversion  of  his  Majes- 
ty's Govenunent,  and  to  the  utter  destniction  of  the  jniblic 
peace,  and  good  order  of  the  said  town  ;  in  which  commo- 
tions and  insurrections  certain  valuable  cargoes  of  teas, 
being  the  property  of  the  East  India  Company,  and  on 


board  certain  vessels  1\  ing  within  the  bay  or  harbour  of 
Boston,  were  seized  and  destroyed :  and  w  hereas  in  the 
present  condition  of  the  said  town  and  harbour,  the 
connnerce  of  his  Majesty's  subjects  cannot  be  safely  carried 
on  there,  nor  the  Customs  payable  to  his  Majesty  duly 
collected ;  and  it  is  therefore  expedient  that  tlie  oiKcers  of 
his  Majesty's  Customs  should  be  forthwith  removed  from 
the  said  town ;  may  it  please  you  Majesty  that  it  may  be 
enacted,  and  be  it  enacted  by  the  King's  most  excellent 
Majesty,  by  and  with  the  advise  and  consent  of  the  Lord< 
Spiritual  and  Temporal,  and  Commons  in  this  present 
Parliament  assembled,  and  by  the  authority  of  the  same, 
that  from  and  after  the  lirst  (lay  of  June,  1774,  it  shall  not 
be  lawful  for  any  person  or  persons  whatsoever,  to  lade  or 
put,  or  cause  or  procure-  to  be  laden  or  put,  oft"  or  from 
any  quay,  wharf,  or  other  place,  within  the  said  town  of 
Boston,  or  in  or  upon  any  part  of  the  shore  of  the  bay. 
commonly  called  the  Harbour  of  Boston,  between  a  certain 
headland  or  point,  called  Nahant  Point,  on  the  eastern  side 
of  the  entrance  into  the  said  bay,  and  a  certain  headland  or 
point  called  Alderton  Point,  on  the  western  side  of  the  en- 
trance into  the  said  bay,  or  in  or  upon  any  island,  creek, 
landing  place,  bank,  or  other  place,  within  the  said  bay, 
or  tieadlands,  into  any  ship,  vessel,  lighter,  boat,  or  bottom, 
any  goods,  wares,  or  merchandise,  whatsoever,  to  be  trans- 
ported or  carried  into  any  other  country,  pro\ince,  or 
place,  whatsoever,  or  into  any  other  part  of  the  said  Pro- 
vince of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  Neiv  England;  or  to 
take  up,  discharge,  or  lay  on  land,  or  cause  or  procure  to 
be  taken  up,  discharged,  or  laid  on  land,  within  the  said 
town,  or  in  or  upon  any  of  the  places  aforesaid,  out  of  ai\\ 
boat,  lighter,  ship,  vessel,  or  bottom,  any  goods,  wares,  or 
merchandise,  whatsoever,  to  be  brought  from  any  other 
country,  province,  or  place,  or  any  other  part  of  the  said 
Province  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  Neiv  England, 
upon  the  pain  of  forfeiture  of  the  said  goods,  wares,  and 
merchandise,  and  of  the  said  boat,  lighter,  ship,  vessel,  or 
other  bottom,  into  which  the  same  shall  be  put,  or  out  of 
which  the  same  shall  be  taken,  and  of  the  guns,  ammuni- 
tion, tackle,  furniture,  and  stores,  in  or  belonging  to  the 
same ;  and  if  any  such  goods,  wares,  or  merchandise,  shall 
within  the  said  town,  or  in  any  the  places  aforesaid,  be 
laden  or  taken  in  from  the  shore  into  any  barge,  hoy,  lighter, 
wherry,  or  boat,  to.be  carried  on  board  any  ship  or  vessel 
outward  bound  to  any  other  country  or  province,  or  other 
part  of  said  Province  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  New 
England,  or  be  laden  or  taken  into  such  barge,  hoy, 
lighter,  wherry,  or  out  of  any  ship  or  vessel  coming  and 
arriving  from  any  other  country  or  province,  or  other  part 
of  the  said  Province  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  Neu- 
England,  such  barge,  hoy,  lighter,  wherry,  or  boat,  shall 
be  forfeited  and  lost. 

And  be  it  further  enacted  by  the  authority  aforesaid, 
That  if  any  wharfinger,  or  keeper  of  any  wharf,  crane,  or 
quay,  or  their  servants,  or  any  of  them,  shall  take  up  or 
land,  or  knowingly  suffer  to  be  taken  up  or  landed,  or  shall 
ship  oft",  or  suffer  to  be  waterborne,  at  or  from  any  of  the 
aforesaid  wharfs,  cranes,  or  quays,  any  such  goods,  wares, 
or  merchandise ;  in  every  such  case,  all  and  every  such 
wharfinger,  and  keeper  of  such  wharf,  crane,  or  quay,  and 
every  person  whatsoever  who  shall  be  assisting,  or  otherwise 
concerned  in  the  shipping  or  in  the  loading  or  putting  on 
board  any  boat  or  other  vessel,  for  that  purpose,  or  in  the 
unshipping  such  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  or  to  whose 
hands  the  same  shall  knowingly  ceme  after  the  loading, 
shipping  or  unshipping  thereof,  shall  forfeit  and  lose  treble 
the  value  thereof,  to  be  computed  at  the  highest  price 
which  such  sort  of  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  shall 
bear  at  the  place  where  such  offence  shall  be  committed, 
at  the  time  when  the  same  shall  be  so  committed,  together 
with  the  vessel  and  boats,  and  all  the  horses,  cattle  and 
carriages,  whatsoever  made  use  of  in  the  shipping,  un- 
shipping, landing,  removing,  carriage,  or  conve3'ance  of 
any  of  the  aforesaid  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise. 

And  be  it  further  enacted  by  the  authority  aforesaid, 
That  if  any  ship  or  vessel  shall  be  moored  or  lie  at  anchor, 
or  be  seen  hovering  within  the  said  bay,  described  and 
bounded  as  aforesaid,  or  within  one  league  from  the  said  ba\ 
so  described,  or  the  said  headlands,  or  any  of  the  islands 
lying  between  or  within  the  same,  it  shall  and  may  be 
lawful  for  any  Admiral,  Chief  Commander,  or  commissioned 


68 


BOSTON  PORT  BILL. 


64 


officer,  of  his  Majesty's  fleet  or  ships  ol  war,  or  for  any 
officer  of  his  Majesty's  custowis,  to  compel  such  ship  or 
vessel  to  depart  to  some  oiIkt  ))ort  or  harhour,  or  to  such 
station  a.s  the  said  officer  shall  appoint,  and  to  use  such  force 
for  that  purpose  as  siiall  be  found  necessary  ;  and  if  such 
ship  or  vessel  shall  not  depart  accordin<:ly,  uithin  six  hours 
after  notice  for  that  purpose  c;iven  by  such  person  as 
aforesaid,  such  ship  or  vessel,  touether  with  all  the  f;oods 
laden  on  board  thereon,  and  all  the  <runs,  ammunition, 
tackle  and  furniture,  shall  be  forfeited  and  lost,  whether 
hulk  sliall  have  been  broken  or  not. 

Provided  alway.i,  That  nothino;  in  tliis  Act  contained 
shall  extend,  or  be  construed  to  extend,  to  any  military  or 
other  stores  for  his  Majesty'suse,  or  to  the  ships  or  vessels 
whereon  the  same  shall  he  laden,  which  shall  be  commis- 
sioned by,  and  in  the  immediate  pay  of,  his  Majesty,  his  heirs 
and  successors :  nor  to  any  fuel  or  \ictual  brouLdit  coastways 
from  any  part  of  the  Continent  of  America,  for  the  neces- 
sary use  and  sustenance  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  said  town 
of  Boston  :  provided  the  vessel  wherein  the  same  are  to  be 
carried,  shall  be  duly  furnished  with  a  cocket  and  let-pass, 
after  having  been  duly  searched  by  the  proper  officers  of 
his  Majesty's  customs  at  Mnrblehead,  in  the  port  of  Sahm, 
in  the  said  Province  of  Mnssncliusdts  Bmj ;  and  the  same 
officer  of  his  Majesty's  Cusioms  he  also  jiut  on  board  the 
said  vessel,  who  is  hereby  authoriz.ed  to  go  on  hoard,  and 
proceed  with  the  said  vessel,  together  with  a  sufficient 
number  of  pereons,  properly  amied,  for  his  defence,  to  the 
said  town  or  harbour  of  Boston  ;  nor  to  any  ships  or  vessels 
which  may  happen  to  be  within  tiie  said  harbour  of  Boston, 
on  or  before  tlie  the  first  day  of  June,  1774,  and  may 
have  either  laden  or  taken  on  board,  or  be  tliere  with  intent 
to  load  or  take  on  hoard,  or  to  land  or  discharge  any  goods, 
wares,  and  merchandise,  provided  tiie  said  ships  and  \  essels 
do  depart  the  said  harbour  within  fourteen  days  after  the 
first  day  of  June,  1774. 

And  be  it  further  enacted  Inj  the  authority  aforesaid, 
That  all  seizures,  penalties,  and  forfeitures,  inflicted  by  this 
Act,  shall  be  made  and  prosecuted  by  any  Admiral,  Chief 
Commander,  or  commissioned  officer,  of  his  Majesty's  fleet, 
or  ships  of  war,  or  by  the  officers  of  his  Majesty's  Customs, 
or  some  of  them,  or  by  some  other  person  deputed  or 
authorized,  by  warrant  from  the  Lord  High  Treasurer,  or 
the  Commissioners  of  his  Majesty's  Treasury,  for  the  time 
being,  and  by  no  other  person  whatsoever  ;  and  if  any 
such  officer,  or  other  person  authorized  as  aforesaid,  shall 
directly  or  indirectly,  take  or  receive  any  bribe  or  reward, 
or  connive  at  such  lading  or  unlading,  or  shall  make  or 
commence  any  collusive  seizure,  information,  or  agreement, 
for  that  purpose,  or  sliall  do  any  other  act  whatsoever, 
whereby  the  goods,  wares,  or  merchandise,  prohibited  as 
aforesaid,  shall  be  suffered  to  pass  either  inwards  or  out- 
wards, or  whereby  the  forfeitures  and  penalties  inflicted  by 
this  Act  may  be  evaded,  every  such  offender  shall  forfeit 
the  sum  of  five  hundred  pounds  for  every  such  offence,  and 
shall  hecome  incapable  of  any  office  or  employment,  civil  or 
military  ;  and  every  person  who  shall  give,  offer,  or  promise, 
any  such  bribe  or  reward,  or  shall  contract,  agree,  or  treat 
with,  any  person,  so  authorized  as  aforesaid,  to  commit 
any  such  offence,  shall  forfeit  the  sum  of  fifty  pounds. 

And  he  it  further  enacted  by  the  authority  aforesaid. 
That  the  forfeitures  and  penalties  inflicted  by  this  Act  shall 
and  may  be  prosecuted,  sued  for,  and  recovered,  and  be 
divided,  paid,  and  applied,  in  like  manner,  as  other  ))enal- 
ties  and  forfeitures  inflicted  by  any  Act  or  Acts  of  Parlia- 
ment, relating  to  the  trade  or  revenues  of  the  British 
Colonies,  or  Plantations  in  America,  are  directed  to  be 
prosecuted,  sued  for,  or  recovered,  divided,  paid  and 
applied,  by  two  several  Acts  of  Parliament,  the  one  ]iassed 
in  the  fourth  year  of  his  present  Majesty,  intituled  "  An 
"  Act  fof  granting  certain  Duties  in  the  British  Colonies 
"  and  Plantations  in  America ;  for  continuinir,  amending, 
"  and  making  perpetual,  an  Act,  passed  in  the  sixth  year  of 
"  the  Reign  of  his  late  Majesty  King  George  the  Second, 
"  intituled,  An  Act  for  the  better  securing  and  encouraging 
"  the  tr.ule  of  his  Majesty's  Sugar  Colonies  in  America ; 
"  for  applyinj;  the  produce  of  such  duties,  and  of  the  duties 
"  to  arise  by  virtue  of  the  said  Act,  towards  defraying  the 
"  expense  of  defending,  protecting,  and  securing,  the  said 
"  Colonies  and  Plantations ;  for  explaining  an  Act  made 
"  in  the  twenty-fifth  year  of  the  Reign  of  King    Charles 


"  the  Second,  intituled,  An  Act  for  the  encouragement  of 
"  the  Greenland  and  Eastland  Trades,  and  for  the  better 
"  securing  the  Plantation  Trade ;  and  (or  altering  and 
"  disallowing  several  drawbacks  on  exports  from  this  King- 
"  dom,  and  more  effectually  preventing  the  clandestine 
"  conveyance  of  goods  to,  and  irom,  the  said  Colonies  and 
"  Plantations,  and  imi)roving  and  securing  the  trade  betw  een 
"  the  same  and  Great  Britain ;"  the  other  passed  in  the 
eighth  year  of  his  present  Majesty's  Reign,  intituled,  "  An 
"  Act  ibr  the  more  easy  and  effectual  recovery  of  the 
"  penalties  and  forfeitures  inflicted  by  the  Acts  of  Parlia- 
"  ment,  relating  to  the  trade  or  revenues  of  the  British 
"  Colonies  and  Plantations  in  America." 

And  be  it  further  enacted  by  the  authority  aforesaid, 
That  every  charter  party  bill  of  loading,  and  other  contract, 
for  consigning,  shipping,  or  carrying  any  goods,  wares,  and 
merchandise,  wh.atsoever,  to  or  iVoni  the  said  town  of  Bos- 
ton, or  any  part  of  the  bay  or  harbour  thereof,  described 
as  aforesaid,  which  have  been  made  or  entered  into,  or 
which  shall  be  made  or  entered  into,  so  long  as  this  Act 
shall  remain  in  full  force,  relating  to  any  ship  which 
shall  arrive  at  the  said  town  or  harbour,  after  the  first  day 
of  June,  1774,  shall  be,  and  the  same  an  hereby  declared 
to  be,  utterly  voiil,  to  all  intents  and  purposes  whatso- 
ever. 

And  be  it  further  enacted  by  the  authority  aforesaid. 
That  whenever  it  shall  be  made  to  appear  to  his  Majesty, 
in  his  Privy  Council,  that  peace  and  obedience  to  the  laws 
shall  be  so  far  restored  in  the  saiil  town  of  Boston,  that 
the  trade  of  Great  Britain  tnay  be  safely  carried  on  there, 
and  his  Majesty's  customs  duly  collected,  and  his  Majesty, 
in  his  Privy  Council,  shall  adjudge  the  same  to  be  true,  it 
shall  and  may  be  lawful  for  his  Majesty,  by  Proclamation, 
or  Order  of  Council,  to  assign  and  appoint  the  extent, 
bounds  and  limits,  of  the  port  or  harbour  of  Boston,  and 
of  every  creek  or  haven  within  the  same,  or  in  the  islands 
within  the  precinct  thereof;  and  also  to  assign  and  appoint 
such  and  so  many  open  places,  quays,  and  wharft,  wuhin 
the  said  harbour,  creeks,  havens,  and  islands,  for  the 
landing,  discharging,  lading,  and  shipping  of  goons,  as  his 
Majesty,  his  heirs,  or  successors,  shall  judge  necessary  and 
expedient ;  and  also  to  appoint  such  and  so  many  officers 
of  the  Customs  therein,  as  his  Majesty  shall  think  fit ;  after 
which  it  shall  be  lawful  for  any  person  or  persons  to  lade 
or  put  oft" from,  or  to  discharge  and  land  ui)on,  such  wharfs, 
quays,  and  places,  so  appointed,  within  the  said  harbour, 
and  none  other,  any  goods,  wares,  and  merchandise,  what- 
soever. 

Provided  always,  Tliat  if  any  goods,  wares  or  merchan- 
dise, shall  be  laden  or  put  off  from,  or  discharged  or 
landed  upon,  any  other  place  than  the  quays,  wharfs,  or 
places,  so  to  be  appointed,  the  same,  together  with  the 
ships,  boats,  and  other  vessels  emjjloyed  therein,  and  the 
horses,  or  other  cattle  and  carriages  used  to  convey  the 
same,  and  the  person  or  persons  concerned  or  assisting 
therein,  or  to  whose  hands  the  same  shall  knowingly  come, 
sliall  suffer  all  the  forfeitures  and  penalties  imposed  by  this 
or  any  other  Act  on  the  illegal  shipping  or  landing  of 
goods. 

Provided  also.  And  it  is  hereby  declared  and  enacted, 
that  nothing  herein  contained  shall  extend  or  be  construed, 
to  enable  his  IMajesty  to  appoint  such  port,  harbour,  creeks, 
quays,  wharfs,  places,  or  oliicers,  in  the  said  town  ofBo'ston, 
or  in  tlie  said  bay  or  islands,  until  it  shall  sufficiently  ajipear 
to  his  Majesty,  that  full  satisfaction  hath  been  made  by  or  on 
behalf  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  said  town  of  Boston,  to 
the  United  Company  of  merchants  of  England,  trading  to 
the  East  Indies,  for  the  damages  sustained  by  the  said 
Company,  by  the  destruction  of  their  goods  sent  to  the 
said  town  of  Boston,  on  board  certain  ships  or  vessels,  as 
aforesaid ;  and  until  it  shall  be  certified  to  his  Majesty,  in 
Council,  by  the  Governor,  or  Lieutenant  Governor,  of 
the  said  Province,  that  reasonable  satisfaction  hath  been 
made  to  the  officers  of  his  Majesty's  Revenue  and  others, 
who  suffered  by  the  riots  and  insurrections  above  men- 
tioned, in  the  months  of  November  and  Dvomber,  in  the 
year  1773,  and  in  the  month  of  January,  in  the  year  1774. 

And  be  it  further  enacted,  by  the  authority  aforesaid, 
That  if  any  action  or  suit  shall  be  commenced,  either  in 
Great  Britain  or  America,  against  any  person  or  persons, 
for  any  thing  done  in  pursuance  of  this  Act  of  Parliament, 


65 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


66 


tlio  defendant  or  defendants,  in  sucli  action  or  suits,  may 
plead  the  general  issue,  and  give  the  said  Act,  and  the 
special  matter  in  evidence,  at  any  trial  to  be  had  thereupon, 
and  that  the  same  was  done  in  pursuance  and  by  the  au- 
thority of  this  Act ;  and  if  it  shall  appear  so  to  have 
been  done,  the  jury  shall  find  for  the  defendant  or  defen- 


dants ;  and  if  the  plaintiff  shall  be  nonsuited,  or  discontinue 
his  action,  after  the  defendant  or  defendants  shall  have 
appeared  ;  or  if  judgment  shall  be  given  upon  any  verdict 
or  demurrer  against  the  plaintiff,  the  defendant  or  defen- 
dants shall  recover  treble  costs,  and  have  the  like  remedy 
for  the  same  as  defendents  have  in  other  cases  by  law. 


III.    BILL   FOR    THE  BE  ITER  REGULATING    THE  GOVERNxAlENT 
OF  THE  PROVINCE  OF  31ASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


HOUSE  OF  COMMONS. 
Friday,  March  25,  1774. 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will  this  day,  after  the  House 
shall  have  ))roceeded  upon  the  other  orders  of  the  day,  re- 
solve itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  to  talie 
into  further  consideration  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Mes- 
sage of  Monday,  the  7th  day  of  this  instant,  March,  together 
with  the  Papers  which  were  presented  to  the  House  by 
Lord  North,  upon  the  7th  and  11th  days  of  this  instant, 
March,  by  his  Majesty's  command. 

Ordered,  That  the  several  Papers  which  were  presented 
to  the  House  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  the  28th  day  of 
November  and  7th  day  of  December,  1768,  and  the  20th 
day  of  January,  \  769  ;  and  also  the  several  Papers  pre- 
sented to  the  House  by  Mr.  Vice  Ciiamberlain,  upon  the 
7th  day  of  May,  1770,  from  No.  1,  to  No.  9,  inclusive, 
relating  to  his  Majesty's  Colonies,  in  North  America,  be 
referred  to  the  said  Committee. 

Ordered,  That  tiie  Paper,  intituled  "  Massachusetts 
"  Bay  Charter,  granted  by  King  fVilliamand  Queen.  Mary, 
"  in  the  tliird  year  of  their  reign,"  which  was  presented  to 
the  House  upon  the  22d  day  o(  January,  1740,  be  referred 
to  the  said  Committee. 

Monday,  March  28,  1774. 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will  immediately  resolve 
itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  to  take  into 
further  consideration  his  Majesty's  most  gracious  Message 
of  Monday,  the  7th  day  of  this  instant,  March,  together 
with  the  Papers  which  were  presented  to  the  House  by  the 
Lord  North,  upon  the  7th  and  11th  days  of  this  instant, 
March,  by  his  Majesty's  command. 

The  House  accordingly  resolved  itself  into  the  said  Com- 
mittee. 

Mr.  Speaker  left  the  Chair. 

Sir  Charles  Whitworth  took  the  Chair  of  the  Com- 
mittee. 

Lord  North  rose  and  said,  he  meant  now  to  open  the 
plan  of  the  Bill  which  he  proposed  to  bring  in  ;  and  as  it 
might  very  well  be  understood  by  gentlemen  in  that  House, 
from  the  Papers  relating  to  America,  that  then  laid  before 
them,  that  an  executive  power  was  wanting  in  tiiat  country, 
and  that  it  was  highly  necessary  to  strengthen  the  magis- 
tracy of  it;  that  the  force  of  the  civil  power  consisted  in 
the  posse  comitatus ;  and  when  it  is  considered,  said  his 
Lordship,  that  the  posse  are  the  very  People  who  have 
committed  all  these  riots,  little  obedience  to  the  preserva- 
tion of  the  peace  is  to  be  expected  from  them.  There 
appears  to  be  a  total  defect  in  the  constitutional  power 
throughout.  If  the  democratic  part  shows  that  contempt 
of  obedience  to  the  laws,  how  is  the  Governor  to  execute 
any  authority  vested  in  him  ?  If  he  wants  any  magistrate 
to  act,  whom  he  knows  will  be  willing  to  execute  the  laws, 
he  has  not  the  power  of  appointing  one,  nor  of  removing 
one  that  will  not  act ;  the  Council  have  alone  that  power, 
whose  dependence  is  on  the  democratic  part  of  tlie  consti- 
tution. It  appears  tliat  the  Civil  Magistrate  has  been,  for  a 
series  of  years,  uniforndy  inactive  ;  there  is  sometliing  radi- 
cally wrong  in  that  constitution,  in  which  no  magistrate 
Fourth  Series.  5 


for  such  a  number  of  years,  has  ever  done  his  duty  in  such 
a  manner  as  to  force  obedience  to  the  laws.  If  the  Govern- 
or issued  a  proclamation,  there  was  hardly  found  a  magis- 
trate to  obey  it ;  the  Governor,  of  his  own  authority,  can  do 
nothing ;  he  cannot  act,  or  give  out  any  order,  without 
seven  of  the  Council  consenting  ;  the  authority  of  that  Go- 
vernment is  in  so  forlorn  a  situation  that  no  Governor  can 
act ;  and,  where  there  is  such  a  want  of  civil  authority,  can 
it  be  supposed  that  the  military,  be  they  ever  so  numerous, 
can  be  of  the  least  service  ?  For  I  shall  always  consider 
that  a  military  power,  acting  under  the  authority  and  con- 
troul  of  a  Civil  Magistrate,  is  part  of  the  constitution ;  but 
the  military  alone  ought  not,  and  cannot  act  without  the 
controul  of  the  Civil  Magistrate.  How  was  it  possible  for 
the  military  to  maintain  good  Government  when  they  were 
not  called  upon  by  the  civil  authority  ?  I  propose,  in  this 
Bill,  to  take  the  executive  power  from  the  hands  of  the 
democratic  part  of  Government ;  I  would  propose,  that  the 
Governor  should  act  as  a  Justice  of  Peace,  and  that  he 
should  have  the  power  to  appoint  the  officers  throughout 
the  whole  civil  authority,  such  as  the  sheriffs,  provost, 
marshal,  &,c. — The  Chief  Justice  and  Judges  of  the  Su- 
preme Court  excepted.  I  would  have  them  only  remova- 
ble by  his  Majesty,  under  his  sign  manual,  and  upon  good 
representations  made  here.  Every  gentleman  will  naturally 
see  the  impropriety  of  such  irregular  assemblies,  or  town- 
meetings,  which  are  now  held  in  Boston ;  I  would  have 
them  brought  under  some  regulation,  and  would  not  suffer 
them  to  be  held  widiout  the  consent  of  the  Governor,  un- 
less upon  the  annual  election  of  certain  officers,  which  it  is 
their  province  to  choose.  Their  juries  are  improperly 
chosen ;  I  think  a  degree  of  regulation  highly  necessary  ; 
I  am  always  ready  and  open  to  hear  those  matters  discussed, 
and  inclined  to  alter  my  opinion,  when  I  hear  better  reasons 
for  adopting  any  other  mode  of  putting  the  civil  magistracy 
of  that  country  upon  a  good  footing  ;  but  until  the  execu- 
tive power  is  free,  it  cannot  act ;  our  regulations  here  are  of 
no  import,  if  you  have  nobody  in  that  country  to  give  them 
force.  Some  immediate,  as  well  as  permanent  remedy, 
must  be  adopted.  I  therefore  propose  the  present  Bill, 
which  I  apprehend  will  effectually  purge  that  constitution 
of  all  its  crudities,  and  give  a  degree  of  strength  and  spirit 
to  the  civil  magistracy,  and  to  the  executive  power.  I 
therefore  move  you,  Sir,  "  That  leave  be  given  to  bring  in 
"  a  Bill  for  the  better  regulating  the  Government  of  the 
"  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay."  I  propose  that  this 
Bill  shall  be  brought  in,  and  lie  upon  tlie  table,  for  tlie  in- 
spection of  the  House  and  gentlemen  who  wish  to  make  the 
propriety  of  such  a  Bill  the  measure  of  their  conduct. 

Mr.  Byng  said,  that  he  could  not  be  at  all  surprised  at 
hearing  that  the  Governor  of  Boston  had  no  power,  when 
lie  had  not  a  single  place  in  his  gift.  It  was  now  become  a 
fashion,  he  said,  to  give  awaydiose  places  of  emolument  to 
men  of  this  country,  widi  reversions  to  one,  two,  or  three 
sons ;  to  men  who  had  never  been  of  the  least  public  ser- 
vice to  this  country,  in  his  apprehensions,  [meaning  Mr. 
Bradshaic]  Whilst  places  continue  to  be  given  away  to 
men  of  this  country,  the  emoluments  of  which  arise  from 
the  labour  and  sweat  of  an  American  brow,  it  will  undoubt- 
edly, and  very  property,  totally  annihilate  the  power  of  any 


67 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


68 


supreme  officer  in  thai  country.  Men  look  up  to  their  su- 
periors, and  obey  tlieir  directions  according  to  the  emolu- 
ments received  from  Uiem ;  and  when  once  their  is  no  de- 
pendence in  it,  there  will  be  no  obedience. 

Sir  F.  Norton  (Speaker)  said,  he  only  got  up  to  know, 
whether  there  was  to  be  an  Assembly  left  to  the  Arnerican.i 
or  not?  For  he  was  not  able  to  say,  from  what  lie  had 
heard  from  the  noble  Lord,  whether  tlie  Assembly  was  to 
be  annihilated  or  not. 

Lord  North  assured  the  right  honorable  member,  that 
there  would  be  nothing;  in  this  Bill  that  affected  either  the 
Assembly  or  the  Council  in  iJieir  legislative  power. 

Mr.  Stephen  Fot.  Can  there  be  any  thing  so  necessa- 
ry to  alter  as  that  Govermnent  which  can  neither  govern 
nor  manage  itself?  The  People  of  Boston  have  behaved 
in  a  most  outrageous  manner,  militating  against  every  prin- 
ciple of  law  and  justice,  combating  against  its  own  consti- 
tutional power,  and  totally  subverting  every  idea  of  order 
and  regularity.  Would  you  let  these  men  go  on  in  the 
chaos  of  disturbance  ?  Would  you  wish  them  to  proceed 
so  precipitately  to  their  destruction  without  once  lending 
the  aid  of  your  deliberations  to  rescue  them  from  the  self- 
conceived  and  false  opinions  which  they  have  imbibed.  I 
ho]>e.  Sir,  this  House  will  lend  its  advice,  and  endeavour  to 
save  these  hot-headed  Americans,  not  by  violent  measures 
but  by  firm  and  manly  proceedings. 

Lord  George  Germain.  It  may  not  be  improper.  Sir, 
I  hope,  to  throw  out  a  little  upon  this  occasion,  and  to  ask 
for  further  information,  to  know  whether  this  is  to  be  the 
extent  of  the  proposition  with  regard  to  the  salutary 
measures  that  are  to  be  made  and  taken  in  tiiis  Committee, 
during  this  whole  Session ;  if  so.  Sir,  I  should  be  glad  to 
give  my  poor  opinion,  and  add  my  mile  of  preservation  to 
that  country.  I  could  have  wished  that  the  noble  Lord, 
when  he  was  forming  this  scheme  of  salvation  to  this  coun- 
trj^,  would  have,  at  least,  considered  that  there  were  other 
parts  of  the  internal  Government  necessary  to  be  put  under 
some  regulation.  I  mean  particularly  the  internal  Govern- 
ment of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Baij.  I  wish  to 
see  the  Council  of  that  country  on  the  same  footing  as  other 
Colonies.  There  is  a  degree  of  absurdity,  at  present,  in 
the  election  of  the  Council.  I  cannot.  Sir,  disagree  with 
the  noble  Lord,  nor  can  I  think  he  will  do  a  better  thing, 
than  to  put  an  end  to  their  town  meetings.  I  would  not 
have  men  of  a  mercantile  cast  every  day  collecting  them- 
selves together,  and  debating  about  political  matters  ;  I 
would  have  them  follow  their  occupations  as  Merchants, 
and  not  consider  themselves  as  Ministers  of  that  country. 
I  would  also  wish,  that  all  corporate  powers  might  be  given 
to  certain  People  in  every  town,  in  the  same  manner  that 
Corporations  are  formed  here  ;  1  should  then  expect  to  see 
some  subordination,  some  authority  and  order.  I  do  not 
know  by  what  power  those  are  to  be  formed,  but  I  wish 
that  they  may  be  formed  by  some.  Again,  Sir,  1  think 
that  the  method  of  Grand  Juries  ought  to  be  much  attend- 
ed to ;  tliey  are  now  chosen  for  life,  and  have  a  yearly 
salary,  and  these  are  the  men  to  whom  your  life  and  pro- 
perty is  entrusted.  Your  People  know  to  whom  to  make 
application,  when  law  and  justice  are  wished  to  be  subvert- 
ed by  favour  and  affection.  Your  Petty  Juries  are  elected 
annually,  so  many  persons  in  each  town ;  to  these  men  of- 
fenders know  how  to  apply  ;  and  when  any  riot  happens 
between  the  military  power  and  the  People  of  the  town, 
the  Jury,  being  taken  principally  out  of  that  town,  the 
power  of  life  and  death  of  the  offender  is  lodged  in  those 
who  are  offended.  These  juries,  I  think,  require  great 
regulation  ;  they  are  totally  different  from  ours,  and  in  my 
idea,  carry  with  them  not  only  the  highest  degree  of  ab- 
surdity, but  are  subject  to  be  led  aside  to  commit  the  high- 
est and  most  palpable  enormities  against  justice  and  the 
laws  of  the  lanfl.  I  would  not  wish  to  protract  the  noble 
Lord's  Bill,  by  lengthening  it  out  to  a  degree  which  he 
does  not  wish  it  to  go,  nor  to  oppose  the  measures  which 
he  has  already  adopted.  I  would  wish  to  bring  the  con- 
stitution of  America  as  similar  to  our  own  as  possible.  I 
would  wish  to  see  the  Council  of  that  country  similar  to  a 
House  of  Lords  in  this.  I  would  v.ish  to  see  chancei-y 
suits  determined  by  a  Court  of  Chancery,  and  not  by  the 
Assembly  of  that  Province.  At  present  tlieir  Assembly  is 
a  downright  clog  upon  all  the  proceedings  of  the  Governor, 
and  the  Council  are  continually  thwarting  and  opposing 


any  proposition  he  may  make  for  the  security  and  welfare 
of  that  Government.  You  have.  Sir,  no  Government,  no 
Governor ;  tlie  whole  are  the  proceedings  of  a  tumultuous 
and  riotous  rabble,  who  ought,  if  they  had  the  least  pru- 
dence, to  follow  their  mercantile  employment,  and  not 
trouble  themselves  with  politics  and  Govermnent,  which 
they  do  not  undei-stand.  We  are  told  by  some  gentlemen, 
oh  !  do  not  break  the  charter ;  do  not  take  away  their 
rights  that  lu-e  granted  to  them  by  the  predecessors  of  the 
Crown  ;  whoever.  Sir,  wishes  to  preserve  such  charters, 
without  a  due  correction  and  regulation ;  ^^  hoever.  Sir, 
wishes  for  such  subjects,  I  wish  them  no  worse  than  to  go- 
vern them.  Put  this  People,  Sir,  upon  a  free  fooring  of 
Government ;  do  not  let  us  be  every  day  asnerting  our 
rights  by  words,  and  they  denying  our  authority,  and  pre- 
venting the  execution  of  our  laws.  Let  us.  Sir,  persevere 
in  refining  that  Government  which  cannot  support  itself, 
and  proceed  on  in  the  manner  we  have  begun,  and  I  make 
no  doubt  but,  by  a  manly  and  steady  perseverance,  things 
may  be  restored  from  a  state  of  anarchy  and  confusion,  to 
peace,  quietude,  and  a  due  obedience  to  the  laws  of  this 
country. 

Lord  North.  I  thank  the  noble  Lord  for  every  propo- 
sition he  lias  held  out ;  they  are  worthy  of  a  great  mind, 
and  such  as  ought  to  be  adopted  ;  and  indeed  I  cannot  say 
that  at  present  there  is  any  objection  to  what  is  proposed 
being  regulated  at  some  future  period  ;  if  any  thing  can 
tend  to  the  relief  of  the  present  distresses  in  America,  it  is 
the  unanimity  of  this  House,  and  of  men  of  such  abilities  as 
the  noble  Lord,  in  the  projection  of  measures  necessary  to 
be  taken.  Every  proposition  the  noble  liOrd  has  mentioned 
coincides  with  my  mind;  1  see  the  propriety  of  them,  and 
1  would  wish  to  adopt  them.  It  is  not  my  proposition  to 
close  this  Committee  before  other  measures  may  be  ofliered, 
which,  for  any  thing  I  know,  may  have  a  degree  of  prefer- 
ence to  those  I  have  this  day  proposed.  I,  for  my  part. 
Sir,  shall  think  of  the  propositions  made,  and  receive  them 
to  be  canvassed  by  greater  wisdom  and  abilities  than  mine. 
1  am  clear,  with  the  noble  Lord,  that  the  constitution  of 
this  charter  ought  not  to  prevent  Parliament  from  inter- 
fering to  regulate  those  matters  in  America,  which  the  in- 
digested measures  of  their  charter  have,  perhaps,  precipi- 
tately been,  in  some  degree,  a  means  of  preventing  the 
peace  and  quietness  of  that  country  from  being  restored. 

Mr.  Phipps  got  up,  but  the  House  being  noisy,  he  was 
not  much  attended  to. 

Mr.  Fownall  used  much  the  same  kind  of  arguments 
he  had  done  in  the  former  debates,  and  gave  a  judicious 
account  of  the  Government  of  Avierica.  He  concluded 
with  giving  to  the  Americans  the  character  of  a  conscien- 
tious, good,  religious,  peaceable  set  of  People,  and  said  that 
there  was  not  in  all  liis  Majesty's  Dominions  a  more  re- 
spectable set  of  persons  existing. 

Lord  North's  motion  was  then  agreed   to,  and 

Mr.  Speaker  resumed  the  Chair. 

Sir  Charles  Wkiticorth  reported  from  the  Committee, 
that  he  was  directed  by  the  Committee  to  move  the  House 
that  leave  be  given  to  bring  in  a  Bill  lor  the  better  regula- 
ting the  Goveniment  of  the  Province  of  the  Massachmctts 
Bay  in  North  America. 

Ordered,  That  leave  be  granted  to  bring  in  the  Bill  ; 
and  that  Sir  Charles  Whitjvorth,  the  Lord  North,  Mr.  At- 
torney General,  and  Mr.  Solicitor  General,  do  prepare  and 
bring  in  the  same. 

Friday,  April  15,  1774. 

The  Lord  North  presented  to  the  House,  according  to 
order,  a  Bill  for  the  better  regulating  the  Government  of 
the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  North  America : 
and  the  same  was  received. 

Lord  North,  on  presenting  the  Bill,  (after  the  breviat 
was  read,  containing  the  projiositions  wliich  in  moving  for 
the  Bill,  he  had  mentioned  as  the  ground  of  it,  with  this  ad-      S 
dition  and  alteration,  "  that  the  nomination  of  the  Council      ^ 
should  be  by  the  Crown,")  said,  in  this  Bill  there  would 
be  no  negative  voice  in  the  Council ;  nor  was  the  Lieu- 
tenant Governor  and  Secretary  to  be  of  the  Council,  unless 
nominated  by  his  Majesty ;  that  the  Council  would  have 
much  the  same  power  as  before,  except  the  nomination  of  ' 
judicial  officers  ;  that  he  had  altered  the  mode  of  choosing 
of  juries,  from  the  hints  that  were  thrown  out  the  other  day 


t 


69 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


70 


in  the  debate  by  a  noble  Lord,  (George  Germain;)  that 
the  principle  on  which  our  juries  were  formed  seemed  to  be 
highly  approved  of,  and  that  of  the  juries  of  America  dis- 
approved of;  that  he  had  now  adopted  the  mode  of  choice 
as  near  the  method  of  choosing  the  juries  in  England  as 
possible ;  that  this  was  a  regulation  of  a  very  nice  kind ; 
and  if  gentlemen  did  not  like  to  have  it  made  part  of  the 
present  Bill,  it  might  be  separated  and  made  a  Bill  of 
Itself. 

Mr.  R.  Fuller  gave  notice,  that  he  intended  to  move  for 
a  Committee  to  inquire  into  the  Tea  Duty  on  Thursday 
next,  to  see  whether  or  not  it  was  possible  to  repeal  that 
Act  before  the  present  one  took  place. 

Mr.  Dempster  desired  to  ask  the  noble  Lord,  by  whom 
the  Governors  and  Judges  were  appointed  formerly,  and 
by  whom  paid  ? 

Lord  North  said,  the  Judges  were  paid  by  the  Crown  ; 
and  that  their  salaries  were  to  accrue  out  of  the  duties 
cliargeable  on  the  tea. 

Mr.  Dowdeswell  said,  he  was  unwilling  to  let  the  day 
pass  without  some  observations  on  the  Bill,  as  it  was 
brought  in  upon  a  different  plan  to  what  it  was  moved. 
He  observed,  that  Government  had  now  received  sufficient 
advice  for  regulating  their  conduct,  and  coming  to  some 
decision  about  what  was  proper  to  be  done  ;  but  the  further 
tJiey  went,  the  worse  they  were ;  that  the  House  had  now 
a  Bill  before  them,  which  was  calculated  to  destroy  the 
charter  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay  ;  that  if,  in- 
deed, we  were  now  to  make  a  new  charter  for  governing 
and  regulating  the  number  of  emigrants  that  are   daily 
going  to  America,  we  should,  perhaps,  make  it  in  a  diffe- 
rent manner,  and  suit  it  more  to  the  disposition  of  the  times : 
but  I  wish,  said  he,  to  see  no  new  charter  granted.     The 
Americans   have  laboured  with  unwearied  industry,   and 
flourished  for  near  fourscore  years  under  that  democratic 
charter ;  they  have  increased  their  possessions,  and  im- 
proved their  lands  to  a  pitch  we  could  not  have  expected, 
and  we  have  reaped  the  benefit  of  their  labour,  yet  you  are 
now  going  to  destroy  that  very  charter  which  has  subsisted 
to  the  mutual  benefit  of  both  countries  ;  the  charter  which 
they  have,  breathes  a  spirit  of  liberty  superiour  to  any  thing 
either  of  the  former  or  present  times.     It  was  granted  in 
King  William's  time,  and  is  more  adapted  to  the  spirit  of  a 
free  people,  than  any  charter  that  can  possibly  be  framed 
by  any  Minister  now  ;  but,  I  hope,  before  this  Bill  passes, 
that  you  will,  at  least,  recollect  yourselves  in  a  cool,  dispas- 
sionate manner,  and  look  upon  Americans  as  your  children, 
and  call  them  by  whatever  name  you  will,  rebellious  or  diso- 
bedient, that  you  will  consider,  at  the  same  time,  that  they 
are  froward  children,  that  there  are  also  peevish  parents,  and 
that  the  ill-humour  and  disposition  of  a  child  is  oftentimes 
brought  about  by  the  petulant  obstinacy  of  a  foolish  parent. 
The  ridiculous  doctrine  that  parents  are  apt  to  instil  into 
their  children,  of  "  you  shall  do  it — you  shall  do  it,"  is 
oftentimes  the  means  of  enforcing  the  same  disposition  in 
the  child,  of  "  I  wont."     I  hate  that  absurd  obstinacy,  of 
"  you  shall,"  and,  "  I  wont,"  between  parent  and  child. 
You  are  not  now  contending  for  a  point  of  honour ;  you  are 
struggling  to  obtain  a  most  ridiculous  superiority,  to  which 
1  hardly  know  a  name  bad  enough  to  stamp  it  with.     The 
regulations  which  you  are  going  to  enact,  will  be  so  inade- 
quate and  so  improper  a  remedy,  that,  in  my  opinion,  it 
would  be  better  to  give  up  the  whole,  than   to  correct  in 
such  a  violent  and  imprudent  manner ;  let  me  at  least  advise 
temper  in  your  proceedings,  and  that  whatever  is  done, 
may  not  be  effected  with  rigour  and  severity. 

Governor  Pownall  rose  to  give  tlie  House  an  account  of 
the  mode  in  which  juries  were  chosen  in  America ;  the 
House  at  first  did  not  much  attend,  but  his  extensive  know- 
ledge in  American  affairs,  soon  drew  that  attention  to  what 
he  said,  which  his  abilities  so  justly  deserved.  He  gave  an 
account  in  what  manner  the  Council  were  chosen  hereto- 
fore ;  that  they  were  elected  by  the  whole  Legislature,  and 
not  (as  had  been  mistakenly  represented)  by  the  People  at 
large ;  that  the  Selectmen  were  a  kind  of  Aldermen, 
much  the  same  as  those  in  Corporations  in  England ;  that 
about  forty  were  chosen  in  each  town,  after  which  the  re- 
maining ones  were  generally  appointed  as  persons  proper 
to  serve  upon  juries,  from  which  five  or  six  people  were 
taken,  as  occasion  required ;  that  the  Grand  Juries  were 
struck  off  from  capital  men,  who  were  appointed  for  that 


purpose.  He  said  great  inconvenience  would  arise  from  the 
town  meetings  not  being  held  without  the  consent  of  the 
Governor ;  that  all  business  of  a  municipal  nature  was  done 
at  a  town  meeting  ;  that  these  towns  were,  in  many  places, 
three  hundred  miles  from  the  Capital,  and  that  business 
must  stand  still  in  many  instances,  in  these  towns,  till  the 
Governor's  consent  could  be  obtained.  He  concluded 
with  expressing  a  wish  that  the  laws  of  the  Province  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  as  far  as  related  to  the  present  Bill, 
might  be  laid  before  the  House. 

The  Bill  was  then  read  the  first  time. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Bill  be  read  a  second  time  upon 
this  day  sevennight. 

Ordered,  (on  the  motion  of  Mr.  Doivdeswell,)  That 
such  a  number  of  copies  of  the  said  Bill  be  printed,  as  shall 
be  sufficient  for  the  use  of  the  members  of  the  House. 

Tuesday,  April  19,  1774. 

Resolved,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  that  he  will  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  direc- 
tions, that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  a  copy  of  an 
Act  of  the  General  Court  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts 
Bay,  made  in  the  fourth  year  of  the  reign  of  King  William 
and  Queen  Mary,  entituled,  "  An  Act  for  regulating  of 
"  Townships,  choice  of  Town  Officers,  and  setting  forth 
"  their  powers ;"  and  also  copies  of  all  other  Acts  of  the 
General  Court  of  the  said  Province,  for  the  regulation  of 
Townships  and  Town  Meetings. 

Resolved,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  that  he  will  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  directions 
that  there  be  laid  before  this  House,  a  copy  of  an  Act  of  the 
General  Court  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Buy, 
made  in  the  seventh  year  of  the  reign  of  King  William  the 
Third,  for  summoning,  returning,  and  regulating  the  choice 
of  Grand  and  Petty  Juries  ;  together  with  copies  of  all  other 
permanent  or  temporary  Acts  of  the  said  General  Court, 
relative  thereto. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Addresses  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty  by  such  members  of  this  House  as  are  of  his  Ma- 
jesty's most  honorable  Privy  Council. 

Resolved,  That  an  humble  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty,  that  he  will  be  graciously  pleased  to  give  directions 
that  there  be  laid  before  this  House : — 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Bernard  to  the  Lords 
Commissioners  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  dated  Boston, 
7th  July,  1766. 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Bernard  to  the 
Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  30th  May,  1768. 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hutchinson  to  the 
Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  6th  July,  1771 ;  with 
a  copy  of  his  Message  to  the  House  of  Representatives, 
and  of  the  Answer  of  the  said  House. 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hutchinson  to  the 
Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  29th  May,  1772. 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hutchinson  to  the 

Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  22d  February,  1773. 

Copies  of  the  Speeches  of  Governor  Hutchinson  to  the 

General   Assembly  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay,  with  the 

Answers  of  the  Council  and  House  of  Representatives. 

Copy  of  a  Petition  and  Remonstrance  from  the  House  of 
Representatives  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
of  the  14th  July,  1772. 

Copy  of  a  Petition  to  his  Majesty  from  the  House  of 
Representatives  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  dated  6th  March, 
1773. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Address  be  presented  to  his 
Majesty  by  such  members  of  this  House  as  are  of  his  Ma- 
jesty's most  honorable  Privy  Council. 

Thursday,  April  21,  1774. 

The  Lord  North  presented  to  the  House,  pursuant  to 
their  Address  to  his  Majesty  : — 

No.  1 .  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Bernard  to 
the  Lords  of  Trade,  dated  Boston,  7th  July,  1766. 

No.  2.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Bernard  to 
the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  30th  May,  1768. 

No.  3.  Extractof  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hu/cAi/ison  to 
the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  6th  July,  1771 ; 
with  a  copy  of  his  Message  to  the  House  of  Representa- 
tives, and  the  Answer  of  the  said  House. 

No.  4.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hutchinson 


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to  the  Earl  of  Hillsborough,  dated  Boston,  Q9th  May,  1772; 
with  an  Enclosure. 

No.  5.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Governor  Hutchinson 
to  the  Earl  of  Dartmouth,  dated  Boston,  iiti  February, 
1773. 

No.  6.  Printed  Copy  of  the  Speeches  of  Governor 
Hutchinson  to  the  General  Assembly  odhe  Massachusetts 
Bay,  with  the  Answer  of  the  Council  and  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives. 

No.  7.  Copy  of  a  Petition  and  Remonstrance  to  the 
Kins,  f'om  tl'e  House  of  Representatives  of  the  Province 
of  Massachusetts  Bay,  dated  14th  July,  1772. 

No.  8.  Copy  of  a  Petition  to  the  Kin<(,  from  the  House 
of  Representatives  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
dated  6lh  March,  177:3. 

Together  with  a  List  of  said  Papers ;  and  the  said  List 
was  read. 

Ordered,  that  the  said  Papers  do  lie  upon  the  table, 
to  be  perused  by  the  members  of  the  House. 

Friday,  April  22,  1774. 

The  Order  of  the  Day,  for  the  second  reading  of  the 
Bill,  was  read. 

Air.  Fuller  said,  he  did  not  rise  to  make  any  debate,  for 
he  was  not  enabled  as  yet  to  form  any  opinion  whether  the 
Bill  before  the  House  was  a  proper  one  or  not;  as  copies  of 
the  charters  which  had  been  ordered,  were  not  yet  laid 
before  the  House,  he  would  venture  to  say  that  no  man 
knew  the  constitution  of  that  Government ;  it  was,  there- 
fore, impossible  for  him  to  say,  in  what  manner  he  would 
correct  and  amend  it. 

Sir  George  Savile  said,  he  had  not  troubled  the  House 
before  on  the  occasion,  but  he  could  not  help  observing, 
that  the  measure  now  before  the  House  was  a  very  doubtful 
and  dangerous  one  ;  doubtful  as  to  the  matter  and  proprie- 
ty of  regulation,  and  dangerous  as  to  its  consequence ;  that 
charters  by  Government  were  sacred  things,  and  are  only  to 
be  taken  away  by  a  due  course  of  law,  either  as  a  punish- 
ment for  an  offence,  or  for  a  breach  of  the  contract,  and  that 
can  only  be  by  evidence  of  the  facts ;  nor  could  he  con- 
ceive that  in  either  of  those  cases  there  could  be  any  such 
thing  as  proceeding  without  a  fair  hearing  of  both  parties. 
This  measure  before  us  seems  to  be  a  most  extraordinary 
exertion  of  Legislative  power.  Let  us  suppose  a  lease 
granted  to  a  man,  wherein  was  a  covenant,  the  breach  of 
which  would  subject  him  to  a  forfeiture  of  his  lease — would 
not  a  court  of  justice  require  evidence  of  the  fact  ?  Why, 
then,  will  you  proceed  different  from  the  line  which  is  al- 
ways observed  in  courts  of  justice.  You  are  now  going  to 
alter  the  charter,  because  it  is  convenient.  In  what  manner 
does  the  House  mean  to  take  away  this  charter,  when  in 
fact  they  refuse  to  hear  the  parties,  or  to  go  through  a  legal 
course  of  evidence  of  the  facts  ?  Chartered  rights  have,  at 
all  times,  when  attempted  to  be  altered  or  taken  away,  oc- 
casioned much  bloodshed  and  strife  ;  and  whatever  persons 
in  this  House  may  have  advanced,  that  they  do  not  proceed 
upon  this  business  but  with  trembling  hands,  I  do  also  as- 
sure them  that  I  have  shewn  my  fears  upon  this  occasion, 
for  I  have  run  away  from  every  question,  except  one,  to 
which  I  gave  my  negative.  I  do  not  like  to  be  present  at 
a  business  which  I  think  inconsistent  with  the  dignity  and 
justice  of  this  House ;  I  tremble  when  I  am,  for  fear  of  the 
consequences  ;  and  I  think  it  a  little  extraordinary  that  Mr. 
Bollan  should  be  admitted  to  be  heard  as  an  American 
Agent  in  the  House  of  Lords,  when  in  the  House  of  Com- 
mons he  was  refused.  I  believe  it  is  true,  that  the  facts  set 
forth  in  his  petition  to  this  House,  were  different  from  those 
which  he  presented  to  the  House  of  Lords  ;  in  one  declarinu' 
himself  an  inhabitant  of  Baton,  and  in  the  other  omitting 
it.  I  cannot  conceive  it  possible  to  proceed  on  this  Bill 
upon  the  small  ground  of  evidence  which  you  have  had. 

Mr.  Welbore  Ellis.  I  must  rise,  Sir,  with  great  diffi- 
dence, when  I  differ  from  the  honorable  gentleman  who 
spoke  last,  whose  abilities  are  so  eminently  great;  but  I 
think,  that  chartered  rights  are  by  no  means  those  sacred 
things  which  never  can  or  ought  to  be  altered ;  they  are 
vested  in  the  Crown,  as  a  prerogative,  for  the  good  of  the 
People  at  large  ;  if  the  Supreme  Legislature  find  that  those 
charters  so  granted,  are  both  unfit  and  inconvenient  for  the 
public  utility,  they  have  a  right  to  make  them  fit  and  con- 
venient: wherever  private  property  is  concerned,  the  Le- 


gislature will  not  take  it  away  without  making  a  full  recom- 
pense ;  but  wlierever  the  regulation  of  public  matter  is  the 
object,  they  have  a  right  to  correct,  control,  or  take  it  away 
as  may  best  suit  the  public  welfare.  The  Crown  may 
sometimes  grant  improper  powers  with  regard  to  Govern- 
ments that  are  to  be  establislied — will  it  not  be  highly  pro- 
per and  necessary  that  the  Legislature,  seeing  in  what 
manner  the  Crown  has  been  ill-advised,  should  take  it  into 
their  consideration,  and  alter  it,  as  far  as  necessary  ?  It  is 
the  Legislature's  duty  to  correct  the  errors  that  have  been 
established  in  the  infancy  of  that  constitution,  and  regulate 
them  for  the  public  welfare.  Is  a  charter,  not  consistent 
with  the  public  good,  to  be  continued  ?  Tlie  honorable 
gentleman  says  much  bloodshed  has  been  occasioned  by 
taking  away  or  altering  of  chartered  rights  ;  I  grant  it ;  but  it 
has  always  been  where  encroachments  have  been  made  by 
improper  parties,  and  the  attack  has  been  carried  on  by 
improper  powers.  He  also  says,  this  form  of  Government  in 
America  ought  not  to  be  altered  without  hearing  the  parties  ; 
the  papers  on  your  table,  surely,  are  sufiicient  evidence 
what  they  have  to  say  in  their  defence.  Look  only  into 
the  letter  dated  the  19th  of  November,  1773,  wherein  the 
Governor  applied  to  the  Council  for  advice,  and  they  neg- 
lected giving  it  to  him ;  and  also  wherein  a  Petition  was 
presented  to  the  Council  by  certain  persons  who  applied 
for  protection  to  their  property  during  these  disturbances ; 
the  Council,  without  giving  any  answer,  adjourned  for  ten 
days,  and  the  Governor  was  not  able  to  do  any  thing  himself 
without  their  opinion.  Look  again,  Sir,  into  the  resolution 
which  the  Council  came  to  when  they  met  again,  stating 
the  total  insufficiency  of  their  power.  This,  surely.  Sir,  is 
an  evidence  competent  to  ground  this  bill  upon.  We  have 
now  got  no  farther  than  just  to  alter  these  two  parts,  as 
stated  by  themselves.  Surely,  Sir,  that  form  of  Govern- 
ment which  will  not  protect  your  property,  ought  to  be 
altered  in  such  a  manner  as  it  may  be  able  to  do  it. 

General  Comvay.  What  I  intend  to  say,  will  not  delay 
the  House  long.  [The  House  being  rather  noisy,  the  Gene- 
ral said,  I  beg  leave  once  more  to  say  a  short  word.]  I  am 
very  sure  what  I  intend  to  say  will  little  deserve  the  atten- 
tion of  the  House,  but  the  subject  is  of  that  importance,  that 
it  requires  it.  The  consequence  of  this  Bill  will  be  very 
important  and  dangerous.  Parliament  cannot  break  into  a 
right  without  hearing  the  parties.  The  question,  then,  is 
simply  this :  have  they  been  heard  ?  What  1  because  the 
Papers  say  a  murder  has  been  committed,  does  it  follow 
they  have  proved  it  ?  '  Audi  alteram  partem'  is  a  maxim 
I  have  long  adhered  to ;  but  it  is  something  so  inconsistent 
with  Parliamentary  proceedings  not  to  do  it,  that  I  am  as- 
tonished at  it.  The  Council  are  blamed,  because  they  did 
not  give  that  advice  to  the  Governor  which  he  wanted.  I 
think,  Sir,  the  Governor  might  have  acted  alone,  without 
their  assistance.  Gentlemen  will  consider,  that  this  is  not 
only  the  charter  of  Boston,  or  of  any  particular  part,  but 
the  charter  of  all  America.  Are  the  Americans  not  to  be 
heard  ?  Do  they  not  choose  to  consent  and  agree  about 
appointing  an  agent?  I  think  there  is  no  harm,  upon  this 
occasion,  in  stretching  a  point ;  and  I  would  rather  hear  Mr. 
Bollan  as  an  agent  of  America  (though  he  is  a  little  irregu- 
lar in  his  appointment)  sooner  than  leave  it  to  be  said,  that 
this  Bill  passed  without  it.  The  House  being  vociferous, 
he  said,  I  am  afraid  I  tire  the  House  with  my  weak  voice;  if 
that  is  the  case,  I  will  not  proceed,  but  I  do  think,  and  it  is 
my  sincere  opinion,  that  we  are  the  aggressors  and  innova- 
tors, and  not  the  Colonies.  We  have  irritated  and  forced 
laws  upon  them  for  these  six  or  seven  years  last  past.  We 
liave  enacted  such  a  variety  of  laws,  with  these  new  taxes, 
together  with  a  refusal  to  repeal  the  trifling  duty  on  tea  ; 
all  these  things  have  served  no  other  purpose  but  to  distress 
and  perplex.  I  think  the  Americans  have  done  no  more 
than  every  subject  would  do  in  an  arbitrary  state,  where 
laws  are  imposed  against  their  will.  In  my  conscience,  I 
think,  taxation  and  legislation  are  in  this  case  inconsistent. 
Have  you  not  a  Legislative  right  over  Irelandl  And  yet 
no  one  will  dare  to  say  we  have  a  right  to  tax.  These 
Acts,  respecting  America,  will  involve  this  country  and  its 
Ministers  in  misfortunes,  and  I  wish  I  may  not  add,  in  ruin. 

Lord  North.  I  do  not  consider  this  matter  of  regulation 
to  be  taking  away  their  charters  in  such  manner  as  is  repre- 
sented ;  it  is  a  regulation  of  Government  to  assist  the  Crown  ; 
it  appears  to  me,  not  to  be  a  matter  of  political  expediency, 


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BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


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but  of  necessity.  If  it  does  not  stand  upon  that  ground,  it 
stands  on  nolliing.  The  account  whicli  has  just  now  been 
read  to  you  is  an  authentic  paper,  transmitted  to  Govern- 
ment here,  shewing  that  the  Council  refused,  in  every  case, 
their  assistance  and  advice ;  and  will  tliis  country  sit  still, 
when  they  see  the  Colony  proceeding  against  your  own 
subjects,  tarring  and  feathering  your  servants ;  denying  your 
laws  and  authority;  refusing  every  direction  and  advice 
which  you  send  ?  Are  we,  Sir,  seeing  all  this,  to  be  silent, 
and  give  the  Governor  no  support  ?  Gentlemen  say,  let 
tlie  Colony  come  to  your  bar,  and  be  heard  in  their  defence  ; 
though  it  is  not  likely  that  they  will  come,  when  they  deny 
your  authority  in  every  instance.  Can  we  remain  in  this 
situation  long  ?  We  must,  effectually,  take  some  measure 
to  correct  and  amend  the  defects  of  that  Government.  I 
have  heard  so  many  different  opinions  in  regard  to  our  con- 
duct in  America,  I  hardly  know  how  to  answer  them. 
The  honourable  gentleman,  who  spoke  last,  formerly  blamed 
the  tame  and  insipid  conduct  of  Government ;  now  he  con- 
demns this  measure  as  harsh  and  severe.  The  Ameiicans 
have  tarred  and  feathered  your  subjects,  plundered  your 
merchants,  burnt  your  ships,  denied  all  obedience  to  your 
laws  and  authority  ;  yet  so  clement,  and  so  long  forbearing 
has  our  conduct  been,  that  it  is  incumbent  on  us  now  to 
take  a  different  course.  Whatever  may  be  the  conse- 
quence, we  must  risk  something ;  if  we  do  not,  all  is  over. 
The  measure  now  proposed,  is  nothing  more  than  taking 
the  election  of  Counsellors  out  of  the  hands  of  those  people, 
who  are  continually  acting  in  defiance  and  resistance  of 
your  laws.  It  has  also  been  said  by  gentlemen — send  for 
the  Americans  to  your  bar — 'give  them  redress  a  twelve- 
month hence.  Surely,  Sir,  this  cannot  be  the  language 
that  is  to  give  effectual  relief  to  America ;  it  is  not  I  say, 
again,  political  convenience,  it  is  political  necessity  that 
urges  this  measure :  if  this  is  not  the  proper  method,  shew 
me  any  other  which  is  preferable,  and  I  will  postpone  it. 

Sir  George  Yonge.  It  appears  to  me,  Sir,  that  it  is  un- 
answered and  unanswerable,  what  has  been  advanced  by 
the  honorable  gentleman  who  spoke  second,  that  the  parties 
should  be  heard,  though  even  at  a  twelvemonth  hence. 
Nothing,  Sir,  but  fatal  necessity  can  countenance  this  mea- 
sure. No  body  of  men  ought  to  be  proceeded  against 
without  being  heard,  much  less  ought  the  regulation  of  a 
whole  Government  to  take  place,  without  the  parties  at- 
tending in  their  defence  against  such  alterations. 

Governor  Johnstone.  I  see,  Sir,  a  great  disposition  in 
this  House  to  proceed  in  this  business  without  knowing  any 
thing  of  the  constitution  of  America ;  several  inconvenien- 
ces will  arise  if  the  Sheriff  is  to  be  appointed  by  the  Go- 
vernor ;  the  jury  will  of  course  be  biased  by  some  influence 
or  other ;  special  juries  will  be  most  liable  to  this.  [Here 
the  Governor  gave  an  account  of  the  different  riots  which 
had  happened  in  England,  and  compared  them  with  what 
he  called  the  false  account  of  those  from  America.]  I  im- 
pute, says  he,  all  the  misfortunes  which  have  happened  in 
America,  to  the  taking  away  the  power  of  the  Governor. 
No  man  of  common  sense,  can  apprehend  that  the  Go- 
vernor would  ever  have  gone  for  two  or  three  days  in 
the  country  during  these  disturbances,  if  he  had  had  the 
command  of  the  military  power.  The  natural  spirit  of 
man  would  be  fired,  in  such  a  manner,  as  to  actuate  him  to 
show  resistance  ;  but  in  this  Governor  no  power  was  lodged. 
I  disapprove  much  of  the  measure  which  is  before  us,  and 
1  cannot  think  but  its  consequences  will  be  prejudicial. 

Mr.  C.  Jenlcinson.  I  rise,  Sir,  only  to  observe,  that  if 
the  Colony  has  not  that  power  within  itself  to  maintain  its 
own  peace  and  order,  the  Legislature  should,  and  ought  to 
have.  Let  me  ask.  Sir,  whether  the  Colony  took  any  step, 
in  any  shape,  to  quell  the  riots  and  disturbances  ?  No, 
they  took  none.  Let  me  ask  again,  whether  all  the  checks 
and  control  that  are  necessary,  are  not  put  into  the  com- 
mission of  the  Governments  ?  Much  has  been  said  about 
hearing  the  parties,  and  taking  away  tliis  chartered  right ; 
I  am  of  opinion,  that  where  the  right  is  a  high  political 
regulation,  you  are  not  in  that  instance  bound  to  hear  them  ; 
but  the  hearing  of  parties  is  necessary  where  private  pro- 
perty is  concerned.  It  is  not  only  in  the  late  proceedings, 
but  in  all  former,  that  they  have  denied  your  authority 
over  them;  they  have  refused  protection  to  his  Majesty's 
subjects,  and  in  every  instance  disobeyed  the  laws  of  this 
country ;    either  let  this  country  forsake   its   trade  with 


America,  or  let  us  give  that  due  protection   to  it  which 
safety  requires. 

Mr.  Harris.  I  cannot  see,  Sir,  any  reason  for  so  wide 
a  separation  between  America  and  England  as  other  gen- 
tlemen are  apt  to  think  there  ought  to  be  ;  that  country.  Sir, 
was  hatched  from  this ;  and  I  hope  we  shall  always  keep 
it  under  the  shadow  of  our  wings.  It  has  been  said,  no 
representation,  no  taxation.  This  was  the  system  formerly 
adopted,  but  I  do  not  find  it  authorized  in  any  book  of 
jurisprudence,  nor  do  I  deem  it  to  be  a  doctrine  either  rea- 
sonable or  constitutional.  1  insist  upon  it,  they  are  bound 
to  obey  both  the  Crown  and  Parliament.  The  last  twelve 
years  of  our  proceedings  have  been  a  scene  of  lenity  and 
inactivity.  Let  us  proceed  and  mend  our  method,  or  else 
I  shall  believe,  as  an  honorable  gentleman  has  observed, 
that  we  are  the  aggressors. 

Sir  Edward  Astley.  If  we  have  had  a  twelve  years' 
lenity  and  inactivity,  I  hope  we  shall  not  now  proceed  to 
have  a  twelve  years'  cruelty  and  oppression.  By  the  reso- 
lution and  firmness  which  I  perceive  in  the  House,  it  seems 
to  indicate  a  perseverance  in  the  measure  now  proposed, 
which  1  deem  to  be  a  harsh  one,  and  unworthy  of  a  British 
Legislature. 

Mr.  Ward  found  fault  with  the  charter  being  left  too 
much,  as  to  the  execution  of  its  powers,  in  the  People,  and 
he  could  not  think  that  the  Lesislature  was  doing  any  thinf^ 
which  it  had  not  a  right  to  do,  as  he  had  looked  upon  all 
charters  to  be  granted  with  a  particular  clause  in  it,  ex- 
pressing that  it  should  not  be  taken  away  but  by  the 
Parliament. 

Governor  Pownall.  Sir,  the  few  words  that  I  shall 
trouble  the  House  with  on  this  occasion,  will  be  directed 
simply  to  facts,  and  to  the  rectifying  some  matters  of  fact 
respecting  the  constitution  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts 
Bay,  which  some  gentlemen,  on  both  sides  the  House, 
seem  to  me  to  have  mistaken,  and  to  have  mis-stated. 

As  to  opinions,  I  shall  never  more  trouble  the  House 
with  mine  on  this  subject.  While  the  affairs  of  America 
remained  on  that  ground,  that  opinions  might  operate  on 
measures  of  policy,  I  never  withheld  mine,  poor  as  they 
may  have  been — I  always  avowed  them  openly  and  pub- 
licly. In  this  House  I  delivered  my  sentiments  explicitly 
and  directly.  It  was  my  duty  so  to  do — I  consider  it  as  of 
perfect  obligation  ;  and  I  hope  I  have  fulfilled  that  duty. 
I  could  not  but  think  it  a  matter  of  imperfect  obligation, 
even  to  obtrude  my  sentiments,  and  the  best  information 
that  I  could  give,  in  other  places,  out  of  this  House.  I 
hope  I  have  not  there  exceeded  my  duty ;  1  have  ex- 
pressed the  same  sentiments  at  all  limes,  and  have  given 
the  same  opinion  in  what  I  have  written  to  America.  All 
tended  to  one  point — the  pointing  out  the  grounds  of  recon- 
ciliation and  peace. 

The  case  at  present  ceases  to  be  matter  of  opinion — it  is 
come  to  action.  The  measure  which  you  are  pursuing  will 
be  resisted,  not  by  force,  or  the  effect  of  arms,  as  was  said 
by  an  honorable  gentleman  on  the  late  occasion,  but  by  a 
regular  united  system  of  resistance. 

I  told  this  House,  (it  is  now  four  years  past,)  that  the 
People  of  America  would  resist  the  tax  which  lay  then 
upon  them — that  they  would  not  oppose  power  to  your 
power,  but  that  they  would  become  impracticable.  Have 
they  not  been  so  from  that  time  to  this  very  hour?  I  tell 
you  now,  that  they  will  resist  the  measures  now  pursued,  in 
a  more  vigorous  way.  You  will  find  them  prepared  for 
such  resistance,  not  by  arms,  but  by  a  system  of  measures. 
The  Committees  of  Correspondence  in  the  different  Prov- 
inces, are  in  constant  coinmunication — they  do  not  trust 
the  conveyance  of  the  Post-Office — they  have  set  up  a 
constitutional  courier,  which  will  soon  grow  up  to  the 
superseding  of  your  Post  Office.  As  soon  as  intelligence 
of  these  affairs  reach  them,  they  will  judge  it  necessary  to 
communicate  with  each  other.  It  will  be  found  inconve- 
nient and  ineffectual  so  to  do  by  letters — they  must  confer. 
They  will  hold  a  conference — and  to  what  these  Commit- 
tees, thus  met  in  Congress,  will  grow  up,  I  will  not  say. 

On  the  other  point,  should  matters  ever  come  to  arms, 
you  will  hear  of  other  officers  than  those  appointed  by  your 
Governors.  When  matters  once  come  to  that  it  will  be,  as 
it  was  in  the  late  civil  wars  of  this  country,  of  little  conse- 
quence to  dispute  who  were  the  aggressors — that  will  be 
merely  matter  of  opinion.     It  is  of  more  consequence  at 


75 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


76 


this  niomeni  so  to  act — to  take  such  measures — that  no 
such  misfortune  may  come  into  event. 

I  hope  the  House  will  excuse  my  trespassing  on  their 
patience — it  is  the  last  time  that  1  shall  speak  on  this  sub- 
ject. If,  however,  the  knowledge  which  my  situation  must 
necessarily  have  supplied  me  with,  can  enable  me  to  be  ot 
any  use  in  matter  of  information,  on  any  points  which  come 
before  you,  I  shall  constantly  attend  in  my  place,  and  in  my 
place  be  ready  to  answer  to  any  questions  on  such  matter, 
as  any  gentleman  may  wish  to  receive  information  upon,  as 
far  as  1  may  be  able  to  inform  him  ;  and  in  this  light  1  beg 
leave  to  state,  that  althougii  by  the  charter  of  the  Province 
of  Massachusetts  Bay  the  Governor  is  obliged  to  take  with 
him,  not  simply  the  advice,  but  tlie  consent  of  the  Council, 
in  the  nomination  of  judges  and  other  civil  officers — yet  it  is 
from  the  power  of  the  Governor's  commission  held  under  the 
broad  seal,  that  all  the  commissions  in  the  Province  are  de- 
rived ;  and  cease  with  the  determination  of  that  commission. 
All  those  officers,  except  the  Attorney  General,  even  the 
Sherifl's,  which  an  honorable  gentleman  had  conceived  not 
to  be  so,  and  which  the  present  proposed  Bill  directs  to  be 
appointed  and  removed  by  the  Governor,  are  according  to 
the  powers  and  privileges  of  the  present  charter,  appointed 
by  the  Governor  in  Council.  The  difference  is,  that  in 
those  Governments  which  are  established  by  the  King's 
patent  commissions,  the  whole  act  of  appointment  is  in  the 
Governor — which  act,  indeed,  he  is  by  his  instructions  di- 
rected to  do  in  the  Act.  He  is  the  sole  efficient :  he  may 
advise  with  the  Council,  but  he  is  not  bound  to  take  their 
consent — he  is  not  incompetent  to  the  act,  without  their 
consent.  His  commission  gives  him  full  power  to  act — if 
he  acts  without  the  advice  of  his  Council,  he  does,  indeed, 
break  through  his  instructions,  and  may  incur  his  Majesty's 
displeasure  ;  but  yet  the  appointment  is  good  to  all  intents 
and  purposes.  The  first  is  the  act  of  legal  power,  derived 
from  the  commission  ;  the  second,  is  a  matter  prudential, 
with  which  the  mode  of  the  act  is  properly  and  wisely  ac- 
companied. 

In  the  charter  under  consideration,  the  matter  of  instruc- 
tion was  made  a  component  part  of  the  act — by  which  the 
Council  were  made  a  component  part  of  the  Governor,  and 
so  far  forth  of  the  supreme  executive  magistrate.  This  I 
have  always  thought  to  be  an  original  and  radical  blunder. 
If  the  Bill,  as  it  was  first  proposed,  had  gone  no  farther  than 
to  the  remedy  of  this  error,  I  think  there  could  not  have 
been  a  reasonable  objection  to  it — but  of  that  I  shall  say 
no  more  now — 1  have  already  given  ray  opinion  on  that 
point. 

Another  gentleman  (misled  by  a  construction  which  some 
Governors  have  made  of  their  powers)  thinks  that  the 
Council  are  so  much,  in  all  cases  of  Government,  a  part  of 
the  supreme  executive  magistrate,  that  if  they  refuse  to  act 
with  the  Governor,  he  cannot  do  any  act  of  Government 
either  civil  or  military.  I  know  of  no  Act  in  which  they 
are  constituted  such  part,  but  in  the  case  of  the  nomination 
of  civil  officers.  In  every  other,  the  Governor,  both  by 
the  charter  and  by  his  commission  is,  perfect  and  complete, 
supreme  executive  magistrate.  I  am  sure  I  can  speak  from 
fact ; — 1  have,  as  Governor,  without  communion  of  power 
with  the  Council,  done  every  civil  act  of  Government, 
which  the  King,  actuating  the  powers  of  the  Crown,  does 
here  within  the  Realm.  And  as  to  the  military,  if  it  had 
been  my  misfortune  to  have  been  Governor  in  these  times, 
and  if  the  interposition  of  the  military  had  been  necessary, 
I  would  not  have  applied  to  them  for  their  aid — I  would 
have  sent  them  an  order.  I  am  sure  there  is  no  officer 
within  the  Province  would  have  dared  to  have  disobeyed  it. 
They  must  have  obeyed.  The  power  to  give  such  order 
is,  both  by  the  charter  and  the  conmiission  (which  are  both 
under  the  broad  seal,)  in  the  Governor,  as  Commander-in- 
chief;  and  I  know  of  no  revocation  of  it,  but  by  the  mere 
letter  of  a  Secretary  of  State,  which  could  have  no  effect ; 
but  which  was  at  the  same  time  one  of  the  most  dangerous 
measures  ever  taken. 

Upon  this  ground,  supposed  to  be  the  fact,  that  the 
Council  are  part  of  the  executive  magistrate,  it  is  alleged  as 
matter  of  crime  against  them,  that  they  refused  to  act  with 
the  Governor  at  the  time  of  the  late  riots ;  by  which  the 
powers  of  Government  were  suspended,  the  power  of  the 
•barter  misused,  so  that  the  Governor  could  not  act ;  but  as 
I  have  shewn  that  this  is  not  the  fact,  the  allegation  of  crime 


vanishes :  yet  I  must  own,  and  I  must  say,  that  as  it  is  al- 
ways for  the  benefit  of  the  public,  that  the  Governor  should 
advise  with,  and  liave  the  advice  of  his  Council — that  as  it 
is  always  of  benefit  to  Government,  that  he  should  take 
with  him  and  be  supported  by  the  authority  of  his  Council, 
and,  especially,  in  this  Province,  where  the  authority  of  the 
country  is  of  more  solid  effect  than  in  any  other — the 
Council,  and  every  member  of  it,  are  highly  biameable,  are, 
indeed,  inexcusable,  whenever  they  refuse  to  advise,  when- 
ever they  withhold  their  authority  from  the  aid  and  support 
of  Government.  1  do  not  know  whether  they  be  not  liable 
to  censure  in  refusing  their  assistance,  as  they  are  by  the 
charter  expressly  called  Assistants;  but  surely  their  conduct 
was  inexcusable,  when,  instead  of  assisting,  they  sought 
and  took  occasion  in  the  midst  of  these  disturbances,  to 
bring  forward  as  an  act  of  Council,  a  report  fraught  with  all 
the  matters  of  contest  and  dispute,  which  were  the  very 
grounds  taken  as  principles  by  the  People  engaged  in  the 
disturbances.  Thus  far  as  to  matter  of  fact;  as  to  matter 
of  opinion,  I  shall  not  trouble  the  House  with  it.  [The 
few  words  afterwards  spoken  by  way  of  explanation,  were 
so  far  from  signifying  that  the  People  were  going  to  rebel, 
that  they  were  expressly  spoken  to  obviate  that  misappre- 
hension of  what  had  been  said.] 

Mr.  Rigby.  LTpon  my  word,  Sir,  what  was  just  now 
said  is  very  worthy  the  consideration  of  this  House;  and 
if,  from  what  the  honourable  gentleman  says,  it  is  true,  and 
I  believe  he  is  well  informed,  it  appears  that  America  is 
preparing  to  arm ;  and  that  the  deliberations  of  their  town- 
meetings  tend  chiefly  to  oppose  the  measures  of  this  coun- 
try by  force.  He  has  told  you.  Sir,  that  the  Americant 
will  appoint  other  officers  than  those  sent  by  Government 
to  command  their  troops.  He  has  told  you  that  a  Post- 
Office  is  established  on  their  account  from  town  to  town,  in 
order  to  carry  their  treacherous  correspondence  from  one  to 
another.  He  has  told  you,  the  Post-Office  revenue  will 
soon  be  annihilated.  If  these  things  are  true.  Sir,  I  find 
we  have  been  the  aggressors,  by  continually  doing  acts  of 
lenity  for  these  twelve  years  last  past.  I  think,  Sir,  and 
speak  out  boldly  when  I  say  it,  that  this  country  has  a  right 
to  tax  America;  but,  Sir,  it  is  matter  of  astonishment  to 
me,  how  an  honourable  gentleman,  (General  Conway)  can 
be  the  author  or  bringer  in  of  a  Declaratory  Law  over  all 
America,  and  yet  saying  at  one  and  the  same  time,  that 
we  have  no  right  to  tax  America !  If  I  were  to  begin  to 
say  that  America  should  not  be  taxed,  and  that  these 
measures  were  not  proper,  I  would  first  desire  my  own 
Declaratory  Law  to  be  repealed  ;  but  being  of  opinion  that 
the  Americans  are  the  subjects  of  this  country,  I  will  de- 
clare freely,  that  I  think  this  country  has  a  right  to  tax 
America ;  but  1  do  not  say  I  w^ould  put  any  new  tax  on  at 
this  particular  crisis ;  but  when  things  are  returned  to  a 
peaceable  state,  I  would  then  begin  to  exercise  it.  And  I 
am  free  to  declare  my  opinion,  that  I  think  we  have  a  right 
to  tax  Ireland,  if  there  was  a  necessity  so  to  do,  in  order 
to  help  the  mother  country.  If  Ireland  was  to  rebel  and 
resist  our  laws,  I  would  tax  it.  The  mother  country  has 
an  undoubted  right  and  control  over  the  whole  of  its  Colo- 
nies. Again,  Sir,  a  great  deal  has  been  said  concerning 
requisition.  Pray,  in  what  manner  is  it  to  be  obtained? 
Is  the  King  to  demand  it?  Or  are  we,  the  Legislative 
power  of  this  country,  to  send  a  very  civil,  polite  gentle- 
man over  to  treat  with  their  Assembly  ?  How  and  in  what 
manner  is  he  to  address  that  Assembly?  Is  he  to  tell  the 
Speaker  of  it,  that  we  have  been  extremely  ill-used  by  our 
neighbours,  the  French;  that  they  have  attacked  us  in 
several  quarters ;  that  the  finances  of  this  country  are  in  a 
bad  state  ;  and,  therefore,  we  desire  you  will  be  kind  enough 
to  assist  us,  and  give  us  some  money  ?  Is  this  to  be  the 
language  of  this  country  to  that ;  and  are  we  thus  to  go 
cap  in  hand  ?  I  am  of  opinion,  that  if  the  Administration 
of  this  country  had  not  been  changed  soon  after  the  pass- 
ing of  the  Stamp  Act,  that  tax  would  have  been  collected 
with  as  iDuch  ease  as  the  land  tax  is  in  Great  Britain.  I 
have  acted,  with  regard  to  America,  one  consistent  part, 
and  shall  continue  in  it  till  I  hear  better  reason  to  convince 
me  to  the  contrary. 

Governor  Powtiall  to  explain.  I  apprehend  I  have  been 
totally  misunderstood.  I  did  not  assert  the  Americans 
were  now  in  rebellion,  but  that  they  are  going  to  rebel ; 
when  that  comes  to  pass,  the  question  will  be,  who  was  the 


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BILL  FOR  GOVERKMEiNT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


78 


occasion  of  it.  Something  lias  been  said  relative  to  requi- 
sition :  I  think  I  gave  several  instances  wlierein  the  same 
had  been  complied  with  in  time  of  war. 

Mr.  Charles  Fox.  I  am  i;lad  to  hear  from  the  lionora- 
ble  gentleman  who  spoke  last,  that  now  is  not  the  time  to 
tax  America:  tiiat  the  only  time  for  that  is,  when  all  these 
disturbances  are  quelled,  and  they  are  returned  to  their 
duty ;  so,  I  find,  taxes  are  to  be  the  reward  of  obedience ; 
and  the  Americans,  who  are  considered  to  have  been  in 
open  rebellion,  are  to  be  rewarded  by  acquiescing  to  their 
measures.  VVlicn  will  be  the  tune  when  America  ought  to 
have  heavy  taxes  laid  upon  it  ?  The  honorable  gentleman 
(Mr.  Right/)  tells  you,  that  that  time  is  when  the  Ameri- 
cans are  returned  to  jieace  and  quietness.  The  honorable 
gentleman  tells  us  also,  that  we  have  a  right  to  tax  Ireland; 
however,  I  may  agree  with  him  in  regard  to  the  principle, 
it  would  not  be  policy  to  exercise  it ;  I  believe  we  have 
no  more  right  to  tax  the  one  than  the  other.  I  believe 
America  is  wrong  in  resisting  against  this  country  with  re- 
gard to  its  l^egislative  authority.  It  v\as  an  old  ojiinion, 
and  I  believe  a  very  true  one,  that  there  was  a  dispensing 
power  in  the  Crown,  but  whenever  that  dispensing  ]30wer 
was  pretended  to  be  exercised,  it  was  always  rejected  and 
opposed  to  the  utmost,  because  it  operated  to  me,  as  a  sub- 
ject, as  a  detriment  to  my  property  and  liberty ;  but.  Sir, 
there  has  been  a  constant  conduct  practised  in  this  country, 
consisting  of  violence  and  weakness,  I  wish  those  measures 
may  not  continue ;  nor  can  I  think  that  the  Stamp  Act 
would  have  been  submitted  to  without  resistance,  if  the  Ad- 
ministration had  not  been  changed  :  the  present  Bill  before 
you  is  not  what  you  want ;  it  irritates  the  minds  of  the 
l^eople,  but  does  not  correct  the  deficiencies  of  that  Govern- 
ment. 

Sir  Gilbert  Elliot  said,  there  was  not  the  least  degree  of 
absurdity  in  taxing  your  own  subjects,  over  whom  you  de- 
clared you  had  an  absolute  right ;  though  that  tax  should 
through  necessity,  be  enacted  at  a  time  when  peace  and 
quietness  were  the  reigning  system  of  the  times  :  you  de- 
clare you  have  that  -right,  where  is  the  absurdity  in  the  ex- 
ercise of  it  ? 

Sir  Richard  Sutton  read  a  copy  of  a  letter  relative  to  the 
Government  of  America,  from  a  Governor  in  America  to 
the  Board  of  Trade,  showing,  that  at  the  most  quiet  times, 
the  disposition  to  oppose  the  law"s  of  this  country  were 
strongly  engrafted  in  them,  and  that  all  their  actions  con- 
veyed a  spirit  and  wish  for  independence.  If  you  ask  an 
American  who  is  his  master,  he  will  tell  you  he  has  none, 
nor  any  Governor,  but  Jesus  Christ.  I  do  believe  it,  and 
it  is  my  firm  opinion,  that  the  opposition  to  the  measures  of 
the  Legislature  of  this  country,  is  a  determined  preposses- 
sion of  the  idea  of  total  independence. 

The  Bill  was  then  read  a  second  time. 

Resolved,  That  this  House  will,  upon  Wednesday  morn- 
ing next,  resolve  itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole 
House,  upon  the  Bill. 

Monday,  April  25,  1774. 

Mr.  Gascoigne  presented  to  the  House,  pursuant  to  their 
Address  to  his  Majesty  : — 

No.  I.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  fourth  year  of  the  reign  of  King 
William  and  Queen  Mary,  intituled  "  An  Act  for  regula- 
"  ting  of  townshij)s,  choice  of  town  officers,  and  setting 
"  forth  their  power." 

No.  2.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  sixth  year  of  the  reign  of  King 
William  and  Queen  Mary,  intituled,  "  An  Act  to  enable 
"  towns,  villages,  and  proprietors  in  common  and  undivi- 
"  ded  lands,  &,c.,  to  sue  and  be  sued." 

No.  3.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Mttssachuictts  Buy,  in  the  fifth  year  of  the  reiijn  of  Queen 
Anne,  intituled  "  An  Act  for  a  new  choice  of  town  officers, 
"  on  special  occasions." 

No.  4.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  ninth  year  of  the  reign  of 
Queen  Anne,  intituled  "  An  Act  directing  the  levying  and 
"  collecting  of  county  and  town  assessments." 

No.  5.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  second  year  of  the  reign  of  King 
fireor^ethe  Fourth,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the  better  regu- 
"  lating  of  town  and  proprietary  meetings." 


No.  6.  Extract  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  first  year  of  the  reign  of  King 
George  the  Second,  intituled,  "An  Act  in  addition 
to  an  Act  for  highways." 

No.  7.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  seventh  and  eighth  years  of  the 
reign  of  King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "  An  Act  in 
"  explanation  of,  and  farther  addition  to,  an  Act,  intituled, 
"  an  Act  for  regulating  of  townships,  choice  of  town  offi- 
"  cers,  and  setting  forth  their  power.'  " 

No.  8.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  sixteenth  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "  An  Act  in  furdier 
"  addition  to  an  explanation  of  an  Act,  intituled,  '  an  Act 
"  for  regiUating  townships,  choice  of  town  officers,  and 
"  setting  forth  their  power.'  " 

No.  9.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  twenty-ninth  year  of  the  reign 
of  King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  revi- 
"  ving  and  continuing  sundry  laws,  that  are  expired,  or 
"  near  expiring." 

No.  10.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  thirtieth  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  George  the  Second,  indtuled,  "  An  Act  in  further 
"  addition  to  an  Act,  iiitituled,  '  an  Act  for  regulating  of 
"  townships,  and  choice  of  town  officers,  and  setting  forth 
"  their  power.'  " 

No.  IL  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  first  year  of  his  present  Majesty's 
reign,  intituled  "  An  Act  for  the  better  regulating  districts 
"  within  this  Province." 

No.  12.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  second  year  of  his  present  Ma- 
jesty's reign,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  reviving  andcontinu- 
"  ing  sundry  laws,  that  are  expired,  or  near  expiring. 

No.  13.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  seventh  year  of  his  present  Ma- 
jesty's reign,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  reviving  and  continu- 
"  ing  sundry  laws,  that  are  expired,  or  near  expiring." 

No.  14.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  tenth  year  of  his  present  Ma- 
jesty's reign,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  reviving  and  continu- 
"  ing  sundry  laws,  that  are  expired,  or  near  expiring." 

No.  15.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  twelfth  year  of  his  present  Ma- 
jesty's reign,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  regulating  town-meet- 
"  ings  in  the  town  of  Danvers." 

No.  16.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  seventh  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  William  the  Third,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  Grand 
"  Jurors  serving  at  the  Quarter  Session  of  the  Peace,  and 
"  punishing  defaulters  of  Jurors  attendance." 

No.  17.  Extract  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of 
the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  seventh  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  William  the  Third,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  holding 
"  of  Courts  of  General  Session  of  the  Peace,  and  ascertain- 
"  ing  the  times  and  places  for  the  same." 

No.  18.  Extract  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of 
the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  eleventh  year  of  the  reign 
of  King  William  the  Third,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the  es- 
"  tablishing  of  Inferior  Courts  of  Common  Pleas,  in  the 
"  several  counties  of  this  Province," 

No.  19.  Extract  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of 
the  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  eleventh  year  of  the  reign 
of  King  William  the  Third,  intituled  "  An  Act  for  esta- 
"  blishing  a  Superior  Court  of  Judicature,  Court  of  Assize, 
"  and  General  Gaol  Delivery,  within  this  Province." 

No.  20.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  twelfth  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  William  the  Third,  intituled,  "  An  Act  relating  to 
"  the  office  and  duty  of  a  Coroner." 

No.  21.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  third  year  of  the  reign  of  King 
George  the  First,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the  more  effec- 
"  tual  preventing  default  in  the  appearance  of  Juiors." 

No.  22.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Provuice  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  twenty-third  year  of  the  reign 
of  King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "An  Act  for  the 
"  better  regulating  the  choice  of  Petit  Jurors." 

No.  23.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  thirtieth  year  of  the  reign  of 


79 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


RO 


King  George  tlie  Second,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  the 
"  better  regulating  tlie  choice  of  Petit  Jurors." 

No.  24.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  tlie 
Massachusetts  6ay,  in  the  thirtieth  3ear  of  the  reijfn  oi 
King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "  An  Act  in  addition 
"  to  an  Act,  intituled,  '  An  Act  for  the  better  regulating  the 
"  choice  of  Petit  Jurors.'  " 

No.  25.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massarhusctts  Bay,  in  the  thirty-third  year  of  the  roign  of 
King  George  the  Second,  intituled,  "An  Act  for  the  better 
"  regulating  the  choice  of  Petit  Jurors." 

No.  26.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  thirty-third  year  of  the  reign  of 
King  George  the  Second,  Intituled,  "  An  Act  in  addition 
"  to  an  Act^  intituled,  '  An  Act  for  the  better  regulating  tlie 
"  choice  of  Petit  Jurors.'  " 

No.  27.  Copy  of  an  Act  passed  in  the  Province  of  the 
Massachusetts  Bay,  in  the  seventh  year  of  his  present  Ma- 
jesty's reign,  intituled,  "  An  Act  for  reviving  and  continu- 
"  ing  sundry  laws,  that  are  expired,  or  near  expiring." 

Together  with  a  list  of  the  said  Papers. 

And  the  said  list  was  reiid. 

Ordered,  That  tiiesaid  Papers  do  lie  on  the  table  to  be 
perused  by  the  members  of  the  House. 

Wednesday,  April  27,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  the  order  of  the  day,  for  the  House  to 
resolve  itself  into  a  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  upon 
the  Bill,  be  now  read. 

And  the  said  order  being  read  accordingly, 

Ordered,  That  the  Paper,  intituled  "  Massachusetts 
"  Bay  Charter,  granted  by  King  JVilliam  and  Queen  Mary, 
•'  in  the  tiiird  year  of  their  reign,"  which  was  presented  to 
the  House  upon  the  twenty-second  day  of  January,  1740, 
be  referred  to  the  said  Committee. 

Ordered,  That  the  several  Papers  which  were  presented 
to  the  House  upon  Monday  last,  by  Mr.  Gascoigne,  be  re- 
ferred to  the  said  Committee. 

Ordered,  That  the  several  Papers  which  were  presented 
to  the  House  by  the  Lord  North,  upon  the  7th  and  lltli 
days  of  March  last,  and  the  15tli  and  21st  days  of  this  in- 
stant, April,  be  referred  to  the  said  Connnillee. 

Then  the  House  resolved  itself  into  the  said  Committee. 

Mr.  Speaker  left  the  Chair. 

Sir  Charles  Whitworth  took  the  Chair  of  the  Committee. 

Mr.  Speaker  resumed  the  Chair. 

Sir  Charles  fVhitvorth  reported  from  the  Committee, 
that  they  had  gone  through  the  Bill,  and  made  several 
amendments  thereunto ;  which  they  had  directed  him  to 
report,  when  the  House  will  please  to  receive  the  same. 

Ordered,  That  the  Report  be  received  to-morrow  morn- 
ing. 

Thuhsday,  April  28,  1774. 

The  order  of  the  day,  for  receiving  the  Report  was 
read  ;  and 

A  Petition  of  William  Botlan,  Esq.,  stylmg  himself 
Agent  for  the  Council  of  his  Majesty's  Province  oi  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,  in  New-England,  being  offered  to  be  pre- 
sented to  the  House,  by  Mr.  DowdesiceU,  which  Pethioner, 
he  said,  desired  that  the  Bill  for  regulating  the  Civil  Gov- 
ernment, and  the  Bill  for  the  more  Impartial  Administra- 
tion of  Justice,  might  not  pass  into  a  law,  until  he  should 
have  time  to  receive  an  answer  from  the  above  Province  to 
letters  he  had  sent. 

Mr.  Dowdeswell  said,  after  the  part  I  have  taken  in  the 
progress  of  these  affairs,  and  the  direct  manner  in  which  I 
have  expressed  myself  on  fonner  occasions,  I  shall  have  the 
less  to  trouble  the  House  with  on  this  occasion.  The  pe- 
tition I  have  now  brought  up  is,  in  the  matter  of  its  request 
so  reasonable,  that  I  cannot  persuade  myself  the  House  will 
reject  it.  I  should  wish  the  affair  might  be  seriously  con- 
sidered. What  is  the  present  stage  of  your  progress? 
You  are  carrying  through  an  Act  tliat  is  to  work  a  total 
change  in  the  chartered  constitution  of  a  free  country,  in 
order  to  prevent  riots  and  an  improper  conduct  in  the  mob 
of  that  country ; — and  lest  in  cai-rying  that  Act  into  execu- 
tion, you  meet  with  a  resistance  that  you  expect,  (and  in 
that  very  expectation  jirove  that  they  may  resist  vvitliout 
the  imputation  of  an  unexpected  crime,)  you  hrin<r  in 
another  to  regulate  the  trial  of  offenders,  by  which  you 


destroy  the  trial  by  jury,  and  drag  the  People  across  the 
Atlantic  10  give  evidence  in  Westminster  Hall:  regulations, 
the  flagrancy  of  which  has  been  sufficiently  ex|)osed,  and 
branded  in  the  manner  they  deserve.  The  Agent  of  the 
Province,  alarmed  at  so  weighty  a  resentment,  and  so  cruel 
a  punishment  on  the  constitution  and  liberty  of  his  country, 
for  the  evil  actions  of  t!ie  scum  of  the  People,  presents  a 
petition  to  you.  What  is  the  purport  of  it  ?  Only  to  pray 
you  to  suspend  your  judgment  until  he  can  recei\e  instruc- 
tions from  his  constituents ; — that  is,  lie  begs  a  whole 
country  may  not  be  condenmed  witl:out  a  single  person  au- 
thorized by  it  to  appear  in  its  defence.  Now,  Sir,  I  think 
the  pi-ayer  of  this  petition  so  perfectly  reasonable,  that  it 
a])pears  impossible  to  be  rejected  out  of  the  Court  of  In- 
quisition. It  is  no  in<juiry  whether  your  measure  is  just  or 
uot ; — we  may  admit  it  to  be,  in  our  opinions,  just,  ])roper, 
and  political  ;  and  yet  assert  the  necessity  of  hearing  the 
Province  before  you  condemn  it  to  a  severe  punishment. 
I  will  not  say  it  is  wrong  to  act  thus — I  say  it  is  imjjossible 
— common  justice — the  feelings  of  mankind,  condemn  it. 

Sir  George  Savik  spoke  ably  on  tlie  same  side  of  the 
question,  as  did  Mr.  Burke,  Mr.  T.  Townshend,  &;c.,  who 
all  urged  how  highly  cruel  it  was  to  pass  a  law  against  any 
body  of  People,  without  hearing  either  them,  or  their 
Agent,  in  their  defence. 

To  the  aguments  of  the  above  gentlemen.  Lord  North, 
made  the  following  reply : 

I  do  not  rise  with  a  design  to  attempt  answering  every 
objection  that  ingenuity  can  frame  against  the  measure. 
The  most  ingenious  man  will  iiever  be  able  to  sketch  a 
plan,  however  simple,  to  which  objections  may  not  be 
started.  The  only  point  at  present  before  us  is,  should 
we  delay  passing  these  Acts,  in  order  to  hear  what  the 
town  of  Boston  can  say,  in  defence  of  themselves.  Is  there 
or  is  there  not  propriety  in  such  a  delay  ?  I  reply,  that  it 
would  be  absurd  ;  the  fact  of  their  crimes  is  authenticated ; 
we  want  no  fresh  proofs  ;  no  gentlem;m  has  expressed  any 
doubts ;  we  should  therefore  wait  to  hear  how  they  might 
exculpate  themselves  (that  is,  the  Council  and  Assembly) 
and  lay  the  blame  on  the  mob  possibly  ;  we  should  suspend 
our  measures,  to  know  what  recompense  they  would  make ; 
we  should  stop  to  hear  their  concessions.  Are  the  friends 
of  these  acts  every  moment  to  recal  to  the  minds  of  their 
opposers,  the  sentiments  they  were  full  of  at  the  opening 
of  the  business  ?  "  Go  to  the  bottom  of  the  evil,  or  let  it 
"  alone ;  no  more  palliatives."  So,  Sir,  if  the  town  of 
Boston  makes  concessions  and  recompenses,  our  business 
is  done,  and  our  purpose  answered.  Very  far  from  it — 
these  Bills  are  not  brought  in  for  one  or  the  other :  they  are 
to  prevent  such  horrid  evils  in  future  ;  to  regulate  the  con- 
stitution on  the  plan  of  other  Colonies,  that  flourish  under 
their  constitution  as  much  as  Boston  with  its  anarchy,  and 
to  indemnify  the  legal  executors  of  your  decrees.  View 
the  affair  in  this  light,  and  all  you  objections  fall.  Let  the 
whole  Colony  appear  at  your  bar,  and  every  argument 
they  can  use,  every  concession  they  can  make,  will  all  be 
relative  to  the  past,  not  to  the  future.  These  Bills  Sir, 
have  much  more  uscfol  and  more  necessary  dLStination, 
the  prevention  of  future  evils.  Should  we  now  delay  the 
progress  of  this  important  business,  in  order  to  go  back  into 
our  old  system  of  palliatives,  under  tiie  pretence  of  hearing 
what  arguments  may  be  used  in  defence  of  the  most 
atrocious  actions  ? 

The.  motion  \\as  also  very  strongly  opposed  by  Mr. 
Wedderljuijif,,  Mr.  Dyson,  he. 

The  House  was  moved,  that  the  Proceedings  of  the 
House,  cf  the  14th  day  of  March  last,  on  receiving  the 
Petition  of  Wi  Ham  Botlan,  Esquire,  Agent  for  the  Coun- 
cil of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in  New  Eng- 
land, miiiht  be  read : 

And  ti;e  same  were  read  accordingly. 

And  the  question  being  but,  that  the  Petition  he 
brought  up  ? 

The  House  divided  ;  Yeas,  32;  Nays,  95. 

So  it  passed  in  the  Negative. 

The  House  was  moved,  that  the  entry  in  the  Journals 
of  the  House,  of  the  9th  of  November,  1696,  of  the 
proceedings  of  the  House,  in  relation  to  ttie  Bill  for 
attainting  Sir  John  Fenwick,  Baronet,  of  High  Treason, 
might  be  read: 

And  the  same  was  read  accordingly. 


I 


«t 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


82 


I 


Tlie  House  was  moved,  that  the  entries  in  the  Journals 
of  the  House,  of  the  19th  day  of  March,  \T22,  of  the 
proceedings  of  the  House,  in  rehition  to  the  Bills  for  inflict- 
inoj  certain  pains  and  penalties  upon  John  Flunlcctt  and 
Georffc  Kelly,  alias  Johnson,  might  he  read : 

And  the  same  were  read  accordingly. 

The  House  was  also  moved,  that  the  entry  in  the 
Journals  of  the  House,  of  the  iJ2d  day  of  March,  172iJ, 
of  the  proceedings  of  the  Hou^e,  in  relation  to  the  Bill  for 
inflicting  certain  pains  and  penalties  upon  Francis  Lord 
Bishop  of  Rochester,  might  be  read  : 

And  the  same  was  read  accorflingly. 

Tlien  a  motion  being  made,  and  the  question  being  put, 
that  the  Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  whole  House,  be 
received  this  day  four  months. 

It  passed  in  the  Negative. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Report  be  now  received. 

Sir  Charles  Whitworth  accordingly  rejwrted  the  amend- 
ments of  the  Committee,  which  were  all  agreed  to  by  the 
House  except  one. 

A  clause  was  then  added  to  the  Bill  authorizing  the 
Court,  where  an  action  is  depending,  to  grant  a  view,  upon 
application  of  either  of  the  parties. 

Another  clause  was  offered,  to  be  added  to  the  Bill, 
that  no  Sheriff  shall  continue  in  office  longer  then  one 
year ;  and  no  Sheriff,  or  Lender  Sheriff,  shall  continue  more 
than  two  years  successively. 

And  the  said  clause  was  once  read,  and,  with  leave  of 
the  House,  withdrawn. 

Then  an  amendment  was  made,  by  the  House,  to  the 
Bill. 

Ordered,  That  the  Bill,  with  the  amendments,  be  en- 
grossed. 

Friday,  April  29,  1774. 

Ordered,  That  the  Bill  for  the  better  Regulating  the 
Government  of  the  Province  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  in 
North  America,  be  read  the  third  time  upon  Monday 
morning  next,  if  tiie  said  Bill  shall  be  then  engrossed. 

Monday,  May  2,  1774. 

Sir  George  Sitvile  presented  a  Petition  of  several 
Natives  of  America,  to  the  House,  which  was  read  ;  setting 
forth, — 

That  the  Petitioners  are  again  constrained  to  complain 
to  the  House  of  two  Bills,  which  if  carried  into  execution, 
will  be  fatal  to  the  Rights,  Liberties,  and  Peace  of  all  Ame- 
rica, and  that  the  Petitioners  have  already  seen,  with  equal 
astonishment  and  grief,  proceedings  adopted  against  them, 
which,  in  violation  of  the  first  principles  of  justice,  and  of 
the  laws  of  the  land,  inflict  the  severest  punishments, 
without  hearing  the  accused :  Upon  the  same  principle  of 
injustice,  a  Bill  is  now  brought  in,  which,  under  the  pro- 
fession of  better  regulating  the  Government  of  the  Massa- 
chusetts Bay,  is  calculated  to  deprive  a  whole  Province, 
without  any  form  of  trial,  of  its  chartered  rights,  solemnly 
secured  to  it  by  mutual  compact  between  the  Crown 
and  the  People.  The  Petitioners  are  well  informed,  that  a 
charter  so  granted,  was  never  before  altered,  or  resumed, 
but  upon  a  full  and  fair  hearing ;  that  therefore  the  present 
proceeding  is  totally  unconstitutional,  and  sets  an  example 
which  renders  every  charter  in  Great  Britain  and  Ameri- 
ca utterly  insecure ;  the  a))pointment  and  removal  of  the 
Judges,  at  the  pleasure  of  the  Governor,  with  salaries 
payable  by  the  Crown,  puts  the  property,  liberty,  and  life, 
of  the  subject,  depending  upon  judicial  integrity,  in  his 
power.  The  Petitioners  perceive  a  system  of  judicial 
tyranny  deliberately  at  this  day  imposed  upon  them,  which 
from  the  hitter  experience  of  its  intolerable  injuries,  has 
been  abolished  in  this  country.  Of  the  same  unexampled 
and  alarming  nature  is  the  Bill,  which,  under  the  title  of  a 
more  impartial  administration  of  justice  in  the  Province  of 
Massachusetts  Bay,  empowers  the  Governor  to  withdraw 
offenders  from  justice  in  the  said  Province ;  holding  out  to 
the  soldiery  an  exemption  from  legal  prosecution  for  mur- 
der; and,  in  effect,  subjecting  that  Colony  to  military 
execution.  The  Petitioners  entreat  the  House  to  consider 
what  must  be  the  consequence  of  sending  troops,  not 
really  under  the  control  of  the  civil  power,  and  unamenable 
to  the  law,  among  a  People  whom  they  have  been  indus- 
triously taught,  by  the  incendiary  arts  of  wicked  men,  to 

Fourth  Series.  6 


regard  as  deserving  of  every  sjjecies  of  insults  and  abuse ; 
the  insults  and  injuries  of  a  lawless  soldiery  are  such  as  no 
free  People  can  long  endure ;  and  the  Petitioners  appre- 
hend, in  the  consequences  of  this  Bill,  the  horrid  outrages 
of  military  oppression,  followed  by  the  desolation  of  civil 
commotions.  The  dispensing  power  which  this  Bill  intends 
to  give  to  the  Governor,  advanced  as  he  is  already,  above 
the  law,  and  not  liable  to  any  impeachment  from  the  People 
he  may  oppress,  must  constitute  him  an  absolute  tyrant ; 
that  the  Petitioners  would  be  utterly  unworthy  of  their 
English  ancestry,  which  is  their  claim  and  pride,  if  they 
did  not  feel  a  virtuous  indignation  at  the  reproach  of  disaf- 
fection and  rebellion,  with  which  they  have  been  cruelly 
aspersed;  they  can  with  confidence  say,  no  imputation 
was  ever  less  deserved  ;  they  appeal  to  the  experience  of  a 
century,  in  which  the  glory,  the  honour  and  the  prosperity, 
of  England,  has  been,  in  their  estimation,  their  own ;  in 
which  they  have  not  only  borne  the  burden  of  Provincial 
wars,  but  have  shared  with  this  country  in  the  dangers  and 
expenses  of  every  national  war ;  their  zeal  for  the  service 
of  the  Crown,  and  the  defence  of  the  General  Empire,  has 
prompted  them  whenever  it  was  required,  to  vote  supplies 
of  men  and  money,  to  the  utmost  exertion  of  their  abilities  ; 
the  journals  of  the  House  will  bear  witness  to  their  extraordi- 
nary zeal  and  services  during  the  last  war,  and  that  but  a 
very  short  time  before  it  was  resolved  here  to  take  from 
them  the  right  of  giving  and  granting  their  own  money.  If 
disturbances  have  happened  in  the  Colonies,  they  entreat 
the  House  to  consider  the  causes  which  have  produced 
them,  among  a  People  hitherto  remarkable  for  their  loyalty 
to  the  Crown,  and  affection  for  this  Kingdom.  No  history 
can  show,  nor  will  human  nature  admit  of,  an  instance  of 
general  discontent,  but  from  a  general  sense  of  oppression. 
The  Petitioners  conceived,  that  when  they  had  acquired 
property  under  all  the  restraints  this  Country  thought 
necessary  to  impose  upon  their  commerce,  trade,  and 
manufactures,  that  to  property  was  sacred  and  secure ;  they 
felt  a  very  material  difference  between  being  restrained  in 
the  acquisition  of  property,  and  holding  it,  when  required 
under  those  restraints  at  the  disposal  of  others ;  they 
understand  subordination  in  the  one,  and  slavery  in  the 
other ;  the  Petitioners  wish  they  could  possibly  perceive 
any  difference  between  the  most  abject  slavery,  and  such 
entire  subjection  to  a  Legislature,  in  the  constitution  of  which 
they  have  not  a  single  voice,  nor  the  least  influence,  and  in 
which  no  one  is  present  on  their  behalf;  they  regard  the 
giving  their  property  by  their  own  consent  alone,  as  the 
unalienable  right  of  the  subject,  and  the  last  sacred  bul- 
wark of  constitutional  liberty.  If  they  are  wrong  in  this 
they  have  been  misled  by  the  love  of  liberty,  which  is 
there  dearest  brithright,  by  the  most  solemn  statutes,  and 
the  resolves  of  this  House  itself,  declaratory  of  the  inherent 
right  of  the  subject,  by  the  authority  of  all  great  constitu- 
tional writers,  and  by  the  uninterrupted  practice  of  Ireland 
and  America,  who  have  ever  voted  their  own  supplies  to 
the  Crown,  all  which  combine  to  prove  that  the  property 
of  an  English  subject,  being  a  freeman  or  a  freeholder, 
cannot  be  taken  from  him  but  by  his  own  consent.  To 
deprive  the  Colonies  therefore  of  this  right  is  to  reduce 
them  to  a  state  of  vassalage,  leaving  them  nothing  they  can 
call  their  own,  nor  capable  of  any  acquisition  but  for  the 
benefit  of  others.  It  is  with  infinite  and  inexpressible 
concern,  that  the  Petitioners  see  in  these  Bills,  and  in  the 
principles  of  them,  a  direct  tendency  to  reduce  their 
countrymen  to  the  dreadful  alternative  of  being  totally  en- 
slaved, or  compelled  into  a  contest  the  most  shocking  and 
unnatural,  with  a  Parent  State,  which  has  ever  been  the 
object  of  their  veneration  and  their  love.  They  entreat 
the  House  to  consider,  that  the  restraints  which  examples 
of  such  severity  and  injustice  impose  are  ever  attended 
with  the  most  dangerous  hatred,  in  a  distress  of  mind,  which 
cannot  be  described.  The  Petitioners  conjure  the  House 
not  to  convert  that  zeal  and  affection,  which  have  hitherto 
united  every  American  hand  and  heart  in  the  interest  ot 
England,  into  passions  the  most  painful  and  pernicious ; 
most  earnestly  tliey  beseech  the  House,  not  to  attempt 
reducing  them  to  a  state  of  slavery,  which  the  English 
principles  of  liberty,  they  inherit  from  their  motlier  country, 
will  render  worse  than  death  ;  and  therefore  praying  the 
House  will  not,  by  passing  these  Bills,  overwhelm  them 
with  affliction,  and  reduce  their  countrymen  to  the  most 


88 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


84 


abject  state  of  misery  and  liuiniliation,  or  drive  to  the  last 
resources  of  despair. 

Ordered,  That  the  said  Petition  do  lie  upon  the  table. 

The  order  of  the  day,  for  the  tliird  reading  of  the  Bill, 
was  read ; 

A  motion  was  made,  and  the  question  being  put,  that 
tlie  said  Bill  be  now  read  a  third  time  r 

Mr.  Dunning.  There  seems  to  me  to  be  a  system  of 
tyranny  adojncd  throughout  the  whole  of  the  three  Bills 
which  have  been  brought  into  this  House,  one  of  which  is 
passed,  and  the  other  two  are  now  under  consideration. 
AV'hiie  the  first  proposition  stood  single,  1  mean  tlie  Boston 
Port  Bill,  1  did  not  think  it  of  sulHcient  magnitude  to 
oppose  it,  till  it  was  followed  by  these  two  others.  It  now 
appears  to  me,  that  the  inhabitants  of  Boston  are  mucii  in 
the  same  condition  as  prisoners  surrendering  at  discretion, 
as  it  is  in  the  jiower  of  the  Minister  to  allow  or  disallow 
the  restoration  of  its  port  and  trade.  (He  then  gave  a 
long  history  to  tiie  House  of  tlie  manner  in  which  the 
Bills  had  been  moved  for  and  brought  in  ;  he  animadverted 
on  the  contents  of  the  three  Bills,  and  commented  on  the 
preamble  of  the  Bill  now  before  tiie  House.]  I  have  not, 
said  he,  heard  of,  nor  do  I  see  any  overt  act  of  treason 
stated  in  tlie  preamble  of  tiiis  Bill,  so  as  to  authorize  the 
severe  punishments  which  it  enacts :  we  are  now,  I  find, 
in  possession  of  the  whole  of  that  fatal  secret,  which  was 
intended  as  a  corrective  for  all  tiie  disturbances  in  America; 
but  it  does  not  appear  to  be  either  peace  or  the  olive- 
branch — it  is  war,  severe  revenge,  and  hatred,  against  our 
own  subjects.  We  are  now  come  to  that  fatal  dilemma, 
"  resist,  and  we  will  cut  your  throats ;  submit,  and  we  will 
tix  you" — such  is  the  reward  of  obedience.  There  appears 
to  me  nothing  of  a  system  or  jilan  throughout  the  whole 
that  has  been  adopted  or  intended,  because  the  Bills  have 
been  so  altered,  in  the  Committee,  that  there  is  scarce  a 
word  remaining  of  the  original  plan,  if  there  was  any ; 
the  preamble  of  the  Bill  now  before  us  seems  to  have  a 
presumption  of  open  resistance,  of  which  no  proof  has  as 
yet  been  had,  or  appeared  at  your  bar,  so  as  to  countenance 
such  an  assertion ;  if  indeed,  that  military  guard,  which 
was  appointed  by  the  town,  had  been  employed  in  the 
manner  as  the  preamble  mentions,  it  might  then  have  been 
deemed  an  open  resistance,  but  nothing  of  that  kind  hap- 
pened ;  the  whole  resistance  that  was  made  was  by  a  few 
rof  the  mob,  urged  on  by  the  impetuosity  of  riot  and  distur- 
bance. Had  any  thing  appeared  that  bore  the  least  simi- 
larity to  treason  or  rebellion,  my  honorable  and  learned 
friends  would  have  told  us  that  it  was  treason,  and  I  will 
give  them  credit  for  their  willingness  upon  such  an  occa- 
sion ;  but  if  there  was  treason,  there  were  traitors,  and 
they  would  have  been  known  and  punished  ;  and  if  not 
known,  they  would  at  least  have  been  inriuired  after  ;  but 
as  no  inquiry  has  yet  been  set  on  foot,  1  will  be  bold  to 
say,  there  was  neither  treason  nor  traitors.  We  seem  to 
be  in  a  strange  condition,  not  knowing  wliom  we  have  to 
deal  with,  nor  in  what  manner  to  act.  If  gentlemen  will 
look  into  the  charter,  it  will  be  seen  that  the  Governor 
complained  without  cause  of  the  want  of  power ;  it  was 
the  ignorance  of  the  Governor  ;  he  had  power,  but  did  not 
know  it;  and  I  think  that  tlie  gendemen  who  had  the 
planning  of  these  Boston  Bills,  have  made  alterations  in 
the  Government  of  Massachusetts  Bay,  without  the  pre- 
vious ceremony  of  knowing  the  old  one.  There  must  be, 
and  certainly  is,  a  complete  legislative  power  vested  in  the 
Assembly  of  the  Province,  to  have  given  this  power  to  the 
Governor,  had  the  charter  been  deficient,  I  mean  for  the 
preservation  of  peace  and  good  order.  [He  spoke  a  lone 
time  to  prove  that  the  constitution  of  Massachusetts  Bay, 
was  in  no  manner  defective,  but  that  the  defect  was  owing 
to  some  unknown  cause ;  and,  said  he,  to  what  I  profess 
I  do  not  know.]  When  1  talk  of  the  Minister,  I  mean  to 
speak  with  all  due  respect  to  the  noble  Lord,  though  I  do 
not  consider  him  as  the  immediate  actor  of  all  this.  I 
know  not  the  age,  the  person,  or  the  sex,  but  that  I  may 
not  be  wrong,  I  will  use  the  language  of  Acts  of  Parlia- 
ment, which  I  imagine  will  comprehend,  and  will  say,  he, 
she,  or  they ;  to  that  person  or  pei-sons  alone  do  I  mean  to 
address  myself.  Let  me  ask,  said  he,  whether  these  mis- 
cliiefs  arising  from  the  charter,  are  peculiar  to  Massachu- 
setts Bay  1  Are  there  no  deficiencies  in  others  ?  Yet  it 
is  said  an  alteration  is  necessary  to  make  the  charter  con- 


formable to  the  Royal  Government.  Now,  do  you  know 
tliat  when  you  have  altered  it,  it  will  not  be  dissimilar  to 
many  of  the  others,  when  the  ignorance  of  the  Govern- 
ment of  one  Province  appears  to  me  to  be  as  great  in  those 
who  are  to  alter  it,  as  in  the  others.  1  find  great  fault. 
Sir,  that  the  whole  of  this  arrangement  is  to  be  under  the 
direction  of  the  Crown  ;  and  that  the  whole  civil  and  mili- 
tary ])ower  of  that  country  is  to  be  totally  at  the  disposal 
of  the  Ministers  of  this.  1  really  think  the  motto  of  this 
Bill  should  have  been  Tua  Casar  tctas.  He  then  went 
through  the  different  clauses  of  the  Bill,  objecting  princi- 
pally against  the  prisoners  being  brought  over  here,  as  eoii- 
laiiied  in  the  last  Bill;  and  that  diliiculties  would  arise 
which  would  convince  gentlemen  who  had  a  concern  in 
the  management  of  these  affairs,  that  what  they  had  done 
had  tended  to  disunite  the  affections  of  the  American  sub- 
jects from  this  country  ;  and,  instead  of  promoting  peace, 
order,  and  obedience,  would  produce  nothing  but  clamour, 
discontent,  and  rebellion. 

Sir  William  Meredith  said,  that  if  necessity  gave  a 
right  to  tax  America,  tlie  stale  of  our  finances  at  the  close 
of  the  last  war  fully  justified  the  Stamp  Act.  That  he 
acknowledged  the  supremacy  of  Great  Britain  over  Ame- 
rica ;  but  that  the  Legislature  of  a  free  country  must  not, 
in  taxation,  or  any  other  act  of  power,  deprive  the  subject 
of  his  right  to  freedom  i:i  person  and  projjerty.  The 
security  an  Englishman  has  in  property  consists  in  this, 
that  no  tax  can  be  imposed  ujion  him  but  by  the  very 
members  of  Parliament  who  pay  the  tax  themselves, 
equally  with  all  those  on  wliom  they  impose  it ;  that  no 
man  had  any  thing  he  could  call  his  own,  if  another  could 
take  his  property,  and  use  it,  either  for  his  advantage,  or 
in  order  to  prevent  the  diminution  of  his  own  fortune ; 
but  that  such  taxes  only  might  be  raised  as  were  conse- 
quential to  regulations  of  trade — «uch  were  port  duties. 
That  a  tax  similar  to  that  upon  tea  was  imposed  by  the 
25th  of  Charles  H.,  since  that  time  upon  molasses,  and 
other  articles,  which  the  Americans  had  acquiesced  in. 
That  he  (Sir  JVilliam)  never  ajiproved  the  tax  upon  tea ; 
had  opposed  it,  as  he  would  always  oppose  the  taxation 
of  America.  But  now,  that  the  Americans  had  not 
only  resisted  the  Act  of  Parliament,  but  laid  violent  hands 
on  the  merchants'  property,  it  was  high  time  to  regulate 
the  course  of  justice,  so  that  our  merchants  might  trade 
thither  with  security.  That  the  present  Regulation  Bills 
went  no  further.  That  they  established  the  trial  by  Jurv 
in  America  the  same  as  in  England ;  whereas  the  juries 
were  now  appointed  according  to  the  mere  will  and  plea- 
sure of  the  Selectmen,  some  of  whom  had  been  fonvard 
in  committing  tliose  excesses  that  occasioned  the  present 
uneasinesses.  That  the  Council  was  now  appointed  by 
the  Assembly,  and  could  contrcul  every  act  of  the  Go- 
vernor ;  the  execution  therefore  of  every  law  enacted  by 
the  British  Parliament,  was  at  their  option  ;  but  that  all 
executive  power  must  be  subservient  to  the  legislative, 
otherwise  the  IjCgislature  itself  would  be  a  mere  cypher. 
We  must  therefore  either  relinquish  at  once  the  right  of 
enacting  laws,  or  take  the  execution  of  them  out  of  the 
hands  of  those  fhat  have  denied  our  authority  to  make 
them.  That  we  had  better  break  at  once  all  connections 
with  America,  than  encourage  our  merchants  to  trade 
thither  without  the  full  protection  of  the  laws  of  their 
country,  both  in  securing  their  effects,  and  in  obtaining 
redress  for  such  injuries  as  they  may  sustain. 

Mr.  Stanley.  These  Bills  certainly  affect  the  interior 
policy  of  America,  and  are  intended  for  the  better  regu- 
lation of  its  internal  Goxernment.  Whatever  may  be  the 
opinion  of  that  propriety  of  regulation  with  the  American, 
I  know  not ;  but  their  submission  to  the  laws  of  some 
country  is  necessary,  as  I  cannot  conceive  the  indepen- 
dence of  an  American  Colony  to  exist,  whilst  the  balance 
of  power  remains  in  Europe,  supported  and  protected 
by  armies  and  navies.  These  People  must  resort  to  some 
State,  and  it  must  be  to  a  Protestant  one ;  and  were  they 
to  unite  themselves  with  any  other  State  than  this,  they 
would  meet  with  a  yoke  and  burden  which  they  would  not 
wish  to  bear.  It  is  said  by  some,  that  this  is  driving  them 
to  a  state  of  slavery ;  by  others,  that  this  proceeding  will 
be  ineffectual.  As  to  the  latter,  if  we  do  not  go  far 
enough,  we  are  certainly  on  the  right  side  ;  but  I  cannot 
sit  still,  and  see   with   indifference  the  authority  of  this 


85 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


86 


country  submitting  to  every  indignity  they  shall  offer  us. 
There  are  but  two  ways  of  governing  mankind,  by  force, 
or  by  consent.  Mankind  are  to  be  governed  by  legal 
power,  acting  by  prescribed  rules  of  law  and  justice ;  and 
a  measure  established  on  this  doctrine,  deserves  the  con- 
currence of  the  House.  [Here  he  gave  a  long  account  of 
the  rise  of  the  American  Government,  and  sheued,  that 
an  inattention  to  it,  in  its  infancy,  had  induced  the  A7ne- 
ricans  so  to  think  of  themselves,  as  to  throw  the  Govern- 
ment into  a  wild  democracy ;  that  it  was  not  till  after 
the  Restoration  that  any  degree  of  attention  was  paid 
them  :  He  then  read  an  extract  from  some  old  papers, 
shewing  that  the  Americans  had,  so  long  ago  as  King 
William's  time,  refused  obedience  to  the  prerogative  in 
many  instances.]  America,  says  he,  is  not  now  to  be 
governed  as  it  might  be  a  hundred  years  ago ;  and  how 
is  it  possible  that  tiie  Council  should,  in  any  shape,  have 
power,  when  it  appears,  that  if  any  person,  of  moderate 
passions  towards  the  degree  of  respect  or  authority  to 
this  country,  is  chosen  of  the  Council,  and  is  inclined  to 
assist  the  Governor,  he  has  always  soon  after  been  dis- 
placed ?  Let  me  ask  gentlemen,  if  the  property  of  the 
subjects  of  this  country  had  been  injured  in  France,  would 
they  have  thought  it  a  prudent  conduct  to  have  sat  still 
and  done  nothing  ?  I  had  much  rather  that  this  dispute 
had  passed  nine  years  ago,  but  I  would  rather  meet  the 
attack  now  than  nine  years  hence ;  and  I  should  blame 
myself  much  if,  by  any  vote  of  mine,  I  should  separate 
so  valuable  a  Province  from  this  country. 

Mr.  T.  Towiishend.  The  importance  of  this  subject, 
and  the  melancholy  consequences  which  are  likely  to 
ensue,  deserve  the  serious  attention  of  this  House.  1  am 
not  in  a  hurry  to  adopt  the  opinion  of  Administration,  but 
I  should"  be  the  lowest  wretch  upon  earth  if  1  suffered 
private  opinion  to  be  smothered.  I  was  determined  to 
give  support  to  the  most  plausible  method  that  was  pro- 
posed, and  I  will  say,  as  to  this  method.  Si  quid  novisti 
rcctius  istis,  candidus  imperti,  si  non,  his  utere  mecum. 
I  am  much  averse  to  the  meddling  with  charters,  but 
when  1  see  the  inconveniencies  that  arise  from  the  town- 
meetings,  I  don't  think  myself  unreasonable  in  wishing  to 
adopt  an  amendment.  1  think  the  Juries  are  properly 
altered,  according  to  the  constitution  of  this  country,  nor 
have  I  any  objection  to  men  being  brought  over  to  England 
to  be  tried,  if  it  is  impossible  to  find  men  of  cool  dispo- 
sition and  proper  temper  to  try  them  in  that  country ; 
and  if  I  see  this  Bill  left  to  the  e^xecution  of  the  abilities 
of  General  Gage,  I  fear  not  the  success  of  it.  I  remem- 
ber, Sir,  that  men  who  were  the  most  violent  in  opposition 
to  the  Stamp  Act,  at  the  time  it  was  agitating,  afterwards, 
when  they  found  it  was  likely  to  pass,  were  applying 
(or  Stampmaster's  places.  I  wished  much  Sir,  to  have 
coupled  this  measure  with  another;  I  mean  the  repeal 
of  the  Tea  Tax,  which  we  might  have  done  without 
showing  the  least  timidity,  but  shall  content  myself  with 
giving  my  affirmative  to  the  present  Bill  before  you. 

Colonel  Barre.  The  question  now  before  us  is,  whe- 
ther we  will  chuse  to  bring  over  the  afi'ections  of  all  our 
Colonies  by  lenient  measures,  or  to  wage  war  with  them  ? 
I  shall  content  myself  with  stating — [Here  he  gave  a  long 
history  in  what  manner  Mr.  Grenville,  as  an  able  financier, 
wished  to  search  for  means  to  liberate  this  country  from 
its  load  of  debts]  that  when  the  Stamp  Act  was  repealed, 
it  produced  quiet  and  ease  :  was  it  then  in  the  contem- 
plation of  any  sober,  honest  mind,  that  any  odier  tax  would 
1)6  laid  on  for  at  least  a  century?  He  blamed  die  late 
Mr.  C.  Toivnshend,  with  all  his  eloquence,  for  loading 
America  with  a  tax ;  nor  was  he,  said  he,  sufficiently 
cautious  in  choosing  proper  Commissioners  for  executing 
his  trust ;  it  was  this  which  disgusted  the  inhabitants  of 
Boston,  and  there  has  been  nothing  but  riots  ever  since. 
It  is  the  duty  of  the  governing  State  to  correct  errors 
and  wrong  opinions.  (Here  he  read  several  extracts  of 
Mr.  Dickinson's  (of  Vhiladelphia)  book,  entitled,  "  Fai- 
mer's  Letters,"  and  from  Mr.  Otis's  book,  entitled  "  The 
"  Rights  of  the  British  Colonies."]  You  sent  over  troops, 
said  he,  in  1768,  and  in  1770  you  were  obliged  to  recall 
them.  The  People  were  fired  at  by  a  lawless  soldiery, 
and  seven  or  eight  innocent  persons  were  killed.  They 
were  carried  about  the  town  as  victims  of  your  revenge,  to 
incite  the  compassion  of  the  friend&^^d  relations  of  the 


deceased,  and  next  morning  you  were  forced  to  order  the 
troops  out  of  town.    He  condemned  much  the  behaviour  of 
Governor  Hutchinson,  as  an  accomplice  in  the  present 
disturbances,  and  commended  the  beliaviour  of  Governor 
Tryon,  who,  knowing  that  he  could  only  land  the  tea  at 
the  muzzle  of  his  guns,  pnidendy  sent  it  back  to  England. 
All  other  Colonies,  he  said,  had  behaved  with  nearly  the 
same  degree  of  resistance,  and  yet  you  point  all  your 
revenge  at  Boston  alone  ;  but  I  think  you  will  very  soon 
have    the  rest    of  Colonies   on   your   back.     You    have 
blocked  up  the  port  of  Boston ;  1  supported  you  in  that, 
and    I    think    1    have  no  great  guilt  on   that  head,  as  I 
thought  it  was  a  measure  arlopted  to  produce  ^  compromise 
for  the  damage  the  East  India  Company  had  sustained. 
You  propose,  by  this  Bill,  to  make  the  Council  of  Boston 
nearly  similar  to  those  of  the  other  Royal  Governments ; 
have  not  the  others  behaved  in  as  bad  a  manner  as  Bos- 
ton ?    And  it  is  ray  opinion,  tliat  the  office  of  Council, 
being  chosen  by  the  Crown,  will  become  so  odious,  that 
you  will  not  get  a  respectable  man   that  dares  to  accept 
of  it,  unless  you  have  the  military  officers  for  tlie  Council, 
whom  I  think,  in  my  conscience,  will  behave  well.     Let 
me  ask  again,  what  security  the  rest  of  the  Colonies  will 
have,  that  upon  the  least  pretence  of  disobedience,  you 
will  not  take  away  the  Assembly  from  the  next  of  them 
that  is  refractory.     [Here   he    blamed    the    House   very 
much  for  not  receiving  the  petition  of  Mr.  BoUan,  who, 
he  said,  had  corresponded  with  the  new  Council,  and  had 
been  allowed  and  received  at  the  public  offices  as  Agent 
for  the  Colonies.]     Why,  said  he,  will  you   pretend  to 
alter  the  charter  of  that  constitution,  of  which  you  know- 
not  its  present  form  of  Government ;   for,  he  said,  he  had 
observed  that  the   late    Governor   of  Boston  (Governor 
PownaU)  had  been,  during  the  different  stages  in  which 
the  Bill  had  been  debated,  going  from  side  to  side  of  the 
House,  to  give  information  about  the   Government  and 
its  laws,  many  of  which  he  remembered ;  some  few  the 
Governor  had   forgot.     In  France,  Sir,  it  is  a  custom, 
said  he,  to  judge  upon  one-sixth,  seventh,  or  eighth,  of 
a  proof — the  unfortunate   Calas,  of  Thoulouse,  was  con- 
demned upon  eight  hearsays,  which  in  France  amounted 
to  a  proof;  but,  surely,   a  British  House  of  Commons 
will  not  condemn  on  such   evidence ;  and  I  hope  never 
to  see    Thoxdouse  arguments   [here  a  member   observed 
he  meant  too   loose  arguments]  admitted   as  proof  here. 
I  do  not  know  of  any  precedent  for  this  Bill — it  is  impos- 
sible to  put  it  in  execution — and  I  will  tell  the  House 
a  story  that  happened  to  us  when  we  marched  at  Ticon- 
deroga ;    "  The    inhabitants   of  that   town   looked  upon 
"  the  officers  of  the  corps  as  men  of  superior  beings  to 
"  themselves,   and    the    youngest   amongst   them,  I    will 
"  answer  for  it,  was  highly  treated,  and   indulged  by  the 
"  fair  sex  to  the  utmost  of  our  wishes,  even  their  wives 
"  and  daughters  were   at  our  service ;"  and  if  the  same 
degree  of  civility  prevails,  think  you  that  it  is  possible 
the  execution  of  this  Bill  can  ever  be  observed  by  your 
army  ?    I  was  of  the  profession  myself,  and  I  beg  leave 
to  tell  the  House  that  I  am  no  deserter  from  it.     I  w-as 
forced   out  of  it  by  means  which  a  man  of  spirit  could 
not  submit  to.     I  take  this  opportunity  to  say  again,  tliat 
I  am  no    deserter   from   my    profession.     [Here    it   was 
strongly  imagined,  that  the  Colonel  meant  to  give  a  broad 
hint  to  Administration,  that  the  line  of  his  profession  was 
not  disagreeable  to  him.]    I  think  this  Bill  is,   in  every 
shape,  to  be  condemned  ;  for  that  law  which  shocks  Equity 
is  Reason's  murderer;    and  all   the    protection  that  you 
mean  to  give  to  the  military,  whilst  in  the  execution  of 
their  duty,  will  serve  but  to  make  them  odious ;  and  what 
is  so  to  others,  will   soon  become  so  to  themselves.     I 
would  rather  see  General    Gage  invested  with  a  power 
of  pardon,  than   to  have  men  brought  over  here  to  be 
tried ;  and  the  state  of  the  case  upon  the  trial,  I  mean 
in  America,  would,  I  am  sure,  justify  such  pardon.     You 
are,  by  this  Bill,   at  war  with   your  Colonies ;  you  may 
march  your  troops  from  North  to  South,  and  meet  no 
enemy  ;  but  the   People  there  will   soon  turn   out,  Jike 
the  sullen  Hollanders,  a  set  of  sturdy  rebels ;  a  perpetual 
exertion  of  your  authority  will  soon  ruin  you ;  therefore, 
let  me  advise  you  to  desist.     Let  us  but  look  a  little 
into  our  behaviour.     When  we  are    insulted  by  France 
and    Spain,  we   negotiate — when    we    dispute    with   our 


87 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


88 


Colonies,  we  prepare  our  sliips  and  our  troops  to  attack 
them.  It  lias  been  the  lanj-uage  of  a  noble  Lord,  that 
when  America  is  at  our  feet,  we  will  forgive  them,  and 
tax  them ;  but  let  me  recommend  lenient  measures,  and 
to  50  cap  in  hand  to  your  subjects  ;  if  you  do  not,  you 
will  ruin  them.  The  great  Minister  of  this  country  (Lord 
Chatham)  always  went  cap  in  hand  to  all :  his  measures 
were  lenient  and  palliative ;  but  we  have  now  adopted 
another  system.  In  one  House  of  Parliament  '•  we  have 
pa.ssed  the  Rubicon,^''  in  tlie  other  "  ileknda  est  Carthago." 
[He  gave  a  history  here  of  tlie  dilferont  state  of  finance 
in  which  France  was :  that  it  was  superior  in  every  degree 
to  this  country  ;  that  tlieir  establishments  were  lower  in 
point  of  expense ;  and  that  France  was  more  ready  and 
fit  to  go  to  war  than  we  were  ;  and  tliat  during  these 
troubles  with  oar  Colonies,  France  would  not  lie  quiel;] — 
But  I  see  nothing,  said  he,  in  the  present  measures  but 
inhumanity,  injustice,  and  wickedness ;  and  I  fear  that 
the  hand  of  Heaven  will  fall  down  on  this  country  with 
the  same  degree  of  vengeance. 

Mr.  6'.  For.  I  rise.  Sir,  with  an  utter  detestation  and 
abhorrence  of  the  present  measures.  It  is  asserted  by 
many  gentlemen,  that  tliese  measures  are  adopted  to  keep 
up  the  regard  of  tiie  People,  b\it  I  can  by  no  means 
acquiesce  in  that ;  a\\  these  Bills  have  no  (|ualilies  relative 
to  those  lenient  measures.  As  to  the  second  Bill,  it  has 
a  most  wanton  and  wicked  purpose ;  we  are  either  to 
treat  the  Americans  as  subjects  or  as  rebels.  If  we  treat 
them  as  subjects,  the  Bill  goes  too  far;  if  as  rebels,  it 
does  not  go  far  enough.  They  have  never  yet  submitted, 
and  I  trust  they  never  will.  We  have  refused  to  hear 
the  parties  in  their  defence,  and  we  are  going  to  destroy 
their  charter  without  knowing  the  constitution  of  their 
Government.  I  am  utterly  against  such  measures  as  these, 
which  can  tend  to  nothing  but  to  raise  disturbance  and 
rebellion. 

The  Marquis  of  Carmarthen.  I  do  not  mean  to  trespass 
long  at  tills  hour  of  tlie  night ;  but  there  is  not  a  person  in 
the  world  a  stranger  to  the  practices  carried  on  in  America, 
with  a  direct  intention  to  throw  off  their  dependance  on 
this  country.  The  opposition  which  they  fomented,  was 
not  made  on  acconnt  of  the  tax,  but  a  systematic  measure 
of  opposition  to  every  part  of  the  law  of  this  country. 
It  might  have  been  tliought  by  sober-minded  People,  that 
the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Act  would  have  brought  them 
back  to  a  sense  of  their  duty :  but,  alas !  Sir,  it  had  a 
contrary  effect.  [He  read  an  extract  of  a  letter  from 
Governor  Bernard,  setting  forth,  that  "  upon  coercive 
"  measures  being  adopted  in  this  country,  the  Americans 
"  seemed  to  give  an  acquiescence  ;  but  whenever  lenient 
"  ones  were  the  system  of  Administration,  they  have 
"  always  been  turbulent  and  riotous."]  It  has  been  ob- 
served, Sir,  by  an  honorable  gentleman  (Colonel  Barri) 
that  a  great  Minister  (Lord  Chatham)  ])roceeded  u[)on 
cap-in-hand  measures.  I  do  not  agree  with  him  on  tiiat 
point,  as  I  never  heard  that  Minister  celebrated  for  that 
part  of  his  character.  I  always  understood  that  his  mea- 
sures were  deemed  spirited  and  vigorous,  and  that  he  was 
the  farthest  man  in  the  world  from  making  use  of  cap-in- 
hand  measures  ;  his  character  was  of  a  far  different  nature. 
But  I  refer  the  House  to  all  the  panegyrics  that  have 
been  passed  on  that  noble  Lord,  for  confirming  what  I 
say.  But,  Sir,  the  time  may  soon  come,  when  that  noble 
liord  will  have  an  opportunity,  in  the  other  House  of 
Parliament,  to  adopt  and  make  use  of  those  cap-in-hand 
measures  which  the  honorable  gentleman  has  just  now 
attributed  to  him,  as  a  part  of  his  character ;  but  1  strongly 
believe  his  synem  will  be  of  a  different  kind. 

Mr.  St.  John.  I  rise.  Sir,  to  take  up  a  few  minutes  of 
the  House's  time,  and  to  make  a  few  observations  upon 
what  has  been  said.  It  has  been  stated  that  this  Bill  is 
taking  away  all  the  rights  of  the  Americans  in  one  day, 
and  that  it  is  a  total  destruction  of  their  charter.  What  is 
this.  Sir,  but  a  gross  misrepresentation  of  Parliamentary 
proceedings  ?  I  hold  it,  Sir,  imprudent  to  meddle  with 
chartered  rights,  but  in  cases  where  the  rights  of  that 
charter  are  exercised  to  the  detriment  and  injury  of  the 
People.  Sir,  Parliament  has  saved  America  from  the 
jaws  of  tyranny,  by  amending  their  constitution  ;  and  to 
say  that  we  have  no  right  to  alter  their  Government  for 
such  purpose,  appears  to  me  the  highest  absurditv;  we 


are  perpetually  altering  and  ameliorating  our  own  constitu- 
tion, upon  emergencies  ;  is  there  then  no  emergency  at 
this  present  instant,  when  your  officers  are  obliged  to  take 
shelter  in  your  castle ;  when  the  magistrates  refuse  to 
execute  their  authority  to  keep  the  ])eace ;  when  your 
ships  are  plundered,  and  your  trade  obstructed  ;  and 
whenever  a  ])erson  endeavours  to  reform  the  constitution 
of  that  country,  he  incui-s  nought  but  pains  and  penalties  ? 
Is  it  no  defect,  that  the  inhabitants,  when  they  meet  to 
choose  their  officers  of  the  town,  that  they  determine  u]ion 
points  that  go  to  the  very  vitals  of  the  constitution  ?  Not 
to  correct  these  deficiencies  in  their  constitution,  hut  to 
give  up  the  points  which  they  contend  for,  would  be  a 
base  surrender  of  the  rights  of  posterity.  It  has  been 
said,  this  law  is  partial,  but  that  that  partiality  is  applica- 
ble only  to  the  People  of  Boston,  who  have  been  the 
ringleaders  of  the  whole  disturbances  ;  that  it  is  slow,  I 
agree,  because  measures  of  this  sort,  when  adopted  on  the 
line  of  security,  proceed  with  an  aUentive  step.  But  I 
cannot  agree  that  the  measure  is  hostile ;  if  it  is,  it  is 
hostility  adopted  for  the  prevention  of  bloodshed.  Have 
we  not  been  provoked  to  this  from  the  manifold  injuries 
Avhicli  this  country  has  received  ?  It  is  not,  Sir,  the 
strength  of  America  that  we  dread  ;  tliey  have  neither 
men,  amiy,  nor  navy.  What  then  have  we  to  fear — do 
we  dread  the  loss  of  our  trade  ?  No,  Sir,  the  avarice  of 
the  Americans  will  prevent  that.  They  threaten  us  with 
not  paying  their  debts;  but  I  am  afraid,  if  we  give  way 
to  them,  they  \vill  not  allow  tliat  they  owe  us  an)- : 
however.  Sir,  let  us  not  proceed  weakly  nor  violently,  but 
with  resolution  and  firmness.  I  approve  of  the  system 
that  is  adopted  ;  and  with  regard  to  a  fair  and  impartial 
trial  in  that  country,  1  think  it  not  only  improbable  but 
impossible  ;  I  therefore  wish  well  to  the  present  Bill. 

Mr.  Bi/ng.  I  am  sorry.  Sir,  to  find  that  we  are  not 
now  proceeding  in  our  judicial  capacity,  but  in  our  legis- 
lative one ;  I  could  wish  that  we  instilled  into  the  measure 
more  judgment,  and  less  of  our  jiower.  It  is  said  this 
measure  is  adopted  to  prevent  bloodshed  ;  is  it  then  that 
you  send  armies  there  for  that  purpose  ?  It  has  been  said, 
that  Parliament  has  bowed  its  head  to  every  Minister  as 
often  as  measures  have  been  adopted.  It  bowed  when 
the  Stamp  Act  was  made!  It  bowed  when  it  was  re- 
pealed I  I  wish,  however,  in  this  present  instance,  it 
would  for  once  not  be  quite  so  civil.  It  has  been  said, 
tiiat  these  Bills  are  for  amending  the  constitution.  Will 
gentlemen  call  that  amendment  a  good  one,  which  directs, 
that  the  Judges'  places  shall  be  at  the  disposed  of  the 
Crown  ?  Surely  not.  It  has  been  said,  Sir,  that  there  has 
been  treason  and  traitors,  but  that  the  traitors  are  not  known. 
There  can  be  no  treason  without  traitors,  therefore  en- 
deavour to  find  out  the  traitors  first,  that  they  may  be 
punished,  to  save  the  destmction  cf  an  innocent  People. 
It  has  been  urged,  that  this  Bill  is  only  for  a  slioit  time  ; 
but  the  same  argument  that  operates  for  its  continuance 
for  an  hour,  will  operate  equally  for  its  perpetuity. 

Mr.  Rigby.  1  ri^e.  Sir,  only  just  to  contradict  an 
opinion  which  has  been  imbibed,  that,  in  the  debate  the 
other  day,  I  wislied  to  tax  Ireland.  I  only  used  it  as  an 
argument  in  my  speech  to  tax  America,  but  never  expres- 
sed a  hint  that  it  was  proper  to  tax  it.  It  has  also  been 
observed,  that  1  treated  requisition  in  a  ridiculous  light ;  1 
did  so ;  and  I  think  any  requisition  to  the  Americans  for 
their  quota  of  their  taxes,  would  be  both  ridiculous  and 
ineffectual.  But  the  honorable  gentleman's  (Mr.  Barri) 
ideas  of  requisition,  go  no  further  than  furnishing  provision 
for  a  regiment.  Tiie  honorable  gentleman  has  taken  three 
or  four  days  to  consider  of  my  speech,  in  order  to  give  it 
an  answer.  I  say  stand  and  deliver,  to  the  Americans, 
just  as  much  as  I  say  to  my  constituents,  when  I  give  my  _ 

vote  to  passing  the  Land  Tax  Bill  ;  but  the  honorable  gen-  9 
tieman  was  very  desirous  to  have  a  fling  at  me.  I  desire, 
Sir,  to  support  the  present  Ministry,  because  I  regard 
them  ;  because  I  have  respect  for  their  abilities  and  resolu- 
tion. That  great  Minister,  Sir,  who  has  been  so  much 
famed  for  cap-in-hand  measures,  did  make  his  country  too 
big  for  any  one,  even  himself,  to  govern.  There  is  not 
a  symptom  that  any  of  the  People  out  of  doors  are 
displeased  with  our  measures  ;  but  I  am  told  quite  the 
contrary.  America,  at  this  instant,  is  in  a  state  of  down- 
right anarchy  ;  let  us  give  it  a  Government.     I  always,  Sir, 


99 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


90 


speak,  when  I  like,  and  hold  my  tongue  when  I  think  pro- 
per ;  and  whatever  weight  and  force  1  may  have  been  re- 
presented to  have,  connected  with  my  friends,  1  would  give 
it  in  support  of  the  noble  Lord ;  I  would  vote,  Sir,  for 
these  measures,  were  I  upon  my  oatli,  \vhich  seems  now  to 
be  the  fashionable  Parliamentary  test  [alluding  to  those  ob- 
jections he  always  made  to  the  oath  of  the  Connnittee 
appointed  to  try  controverted  elections ;]  and  w  hether  1 
am  upon  my  honour,  or  my  oath,  i  will  give  a  hearty 
concurrence  to  these  measures. 

General  Conway.  I  would  not  take  up  the  time  of  the 
House  at  tiiis  late  "hour  of  the  night,  but  for  a  very  short 
time.  I  never  did  maintain  that  Great  Britain  had  no 
riffht  to  tax  America ;  I  said  taxation  and  legislation  had 
no  connection ;  I  allowed  tJiat  we  had  an  abstract  right 
to  tax  Ireland,  and  also  America,  in  die  Declaratory  Act  ; 
but  1  do  not  know  the  time  when  it  w  ill  be  proper  and 
right  so  to  tax.  This  measure  will  throw-  us  into  great 
dirticulties,  which  1  do  not  know  when  we  shall  get  out 
of  The  tax  upon  tea  does  nothing  for  our  revenue,  it  is 
no  object ;  as  long  as  you  continue  the  doctrine  of  taxing 
America,  you  will  never  be  at  rest.  Where  is  this  olive 
branch  I  have  heard  so  nmch  talk  about  ?  It  is  not  to  be 
found  in  these  measures.  I  do  not  wish  to  see  tiie  military 
protected  from  the  laws  of  their  country  ;  if  they  commit 
an  offence,  why  not  leave  them  open  in  the  same  manner 
as  others  are  ?  I  have  said,  "  that  we  are  the  aggi-essors," 
and  I  say  so  still ;  after  so  many  innovations  of  the  Stamp 
Act,  and  other  taxes,  1  am  for  cap-in-hand  measures — 
for  lenity  and  tenderness  to  the  Americans.  There  is 
an  universal  right  in  persons  to  be  heard  at  this  Bar  in 
judicial  cases,  when  they  apply  for  it ;  but  I  rise,  Sir, 
only  to  lament  what  1  cannot  prevent ;  and  that  this 
spirit  may  be  rightly  directed,  1  do  hope  that  the  Ameri- 
cans will  wait  till  better  times  ;  for  I  tliink  it  is  better 
to  have  peace  with  America,  and  war  with  all  the  world, 
than  be  at  war  with  America ;  because,  if  they  are 
at  peace  with  us,  they  will  contribute  to  support  us  in  time 
of  war. 

Lord  G.  Germaine.  I  hope  I  shall  be  excused,  Sir, 
for  trespassing  a  few  minutes  on  the  House.  I  should 
be  sorry  to  be  a  supporter  of  those  measures,  which  are 
termed  wicked  and  tyrannical ;  but  as  I  cannot  think  that 
this  Bill  has  any  such  designs,  1  shall  readily  adopt  it. 
Tlie  trial  of  the  military  has  been  much  objected  to. 
What  is  it,  Sir,  but  a  protection  of  innocence  ?  Will  you 
not  wish  for  that,  Sir?  America,  at  this  instant,  is  no- 
thing but  anarchy  and  confusion.  Have  they  any  one 
measure  but  what  depends  upon  the  will  of  a  lawless 
nmltitude?  Where  are  the  Courts  of  Justice  ?  Shut  up. 
Where  are  your  Judges?  One  of  them  taking  refuge  in 
your  Court.  WHere  are  your  Council  ?  Where  is  your 
Governor  ?  All  of  them  intimidated  by  a  lawless  rabble. 
Can  these  men  expect  a  fair  trial  ?  No,  Sir,  at  present  they 
liave  no  existence  as  any  part  of  the  executive  power. 
It  is  objected,  that  the  Judges  receive  their  salaries  from 
the  Crown,  and  not  from  the  People.  It  is  to  me  a  matter 
of  surprise,  that  any  gentleman  could  think  seriously  a  mo- 
ment, tiiat  this  Government  wanted  no  amendment.  It 
has  been  said,  give  up  the  Tea  Tax  :  Can  you  give  up  the 
Tea  Tax,  without  the  constitution  ?  Support  your  suprema- 
cy, whatever  you  do ;  legislation  cannot  but  be  part  of  it. 
It  has  been  observed,  that  we  negotiated  about  Falkland's 
Island;  I  wish.  Sir,  we  could  negodate  with  the  Aine- 
rirans  upon  the  same  terms.  If  they  would  do  as  the 
Spaniards  did,  that  is,  disown  the  fact,  and  give  up  the 
point  in  question,  we  might  then  negotiate.  The  Ame- 
ricans, it  is  true,  have  made  this  claim  several  years,  of 
exemption  from  taxation,  but  they  have  never  yet  carried 
it.  Great  Britain,  is  desired  to  be  at  peace  with  her 
Colonies,  by  an  accjuiescence  in  their  claim  ;  but  do  you 
call  such  a  submission  to  be  a  peace  ?  1  really  think  the 
(ii-st  Bill,  for  blocking  up  the  port,  is  the  only  Bill  of  pains 
and  penalties,  when  you  deprive  that  port  of  its  trade ; 
and  this  was  tlie  Bill  to  which  the  honorable  gentleman 
(Colonel  Barre)  gave  his  hearty  concurrence.  The  Bill 
before  you  is  not  such  a  Bill :  there  are  no  pains  nor 
penalties  ;  their  Government  will  be  restored,  and  private 
property  protected.  It  has  been  said,  go  to  the  King's 
Bench  with  this  complaint,  as  in  former  times;  but  let  me 
ask  gentlemen,  whether  thev  can  ameliorate  or  alter  their 


charter  ?  No,  Sir,  they  can  do  nothing  but  say  ginlty  or 
not  guilty,  by  forfeiting  their  charter.  It  is  incumbent  on 
every  man  to  give  his  opinion  from  his  own  breast  upon 
this  great  occasion ;  but  Sir,  I  cannot  help  once  more 
condemning  that  mob  of  People,  which,  under  the  profes- 
sion of  libeity,  carries  dark  designs  in  its  execution  ;  but 
my  utmost  wish  is,  that  these  measures,  in  tlieir  conse- 
quences, may  turn  out  well,  and  contrary  to  what  has 
been  apprehended. 

Mr.  C.  Fox.  I  take  this  to  be  the  question — whether 
America  is  to  be  gov(;nied  by  force,  or  management? 
I  never  could  conceive  that  the  Americans  could  be 
taxed  without  their  consent.  Just  as  the  House  of  Com- 
mons stands  to  the  House  of  I^ords,  with  regard  to  taxa- 
tion and  legislation,  so  stands  America  with  Great  Britain. 
There  is  not  an  American,  but  who  must  reject  and  resist 
the  principle  and  right  of  our  taxing  them.  The  question 
then  is  shortly  this :  Whether  we  ought  to  govern  America 
on  these  principles?  Can  this  country  gain  strength  by 
keeping  uj)  such  a  dispute  as  this  ?  Tell  me  when  Ame- 
rica is  to  be  taxed,  so  as  to  relieve  the  burthens  of  this 
country.  I  look  upon  this  measure  to  be  in  effect  taking 
away  their  charter ;  if  their  charier  is  to  be  taken  away, 
for  God's  sake  let  it  be  taken  away  by  law,  and  not  by 
a  legislative  coercion :  but  I  cannot  conceive  that  any  law 
whatever,  while  their  charter  continues,  will  make  them 
think  that  you  have  a  right  to  tax  them.  If  a  system  of 
force  is  to  be  established,  there  is  no  provision  for  that  in 
this  Bill ;  it  does  not  go  far  enough ;  if  it  is  to  induce  them 
by  fair  means,  it  goes  too  far.  The  only  method  by 
which  the  Americans  will  ever  think  they  are  attached 
to  this  country,  will  be  by  laying  aside  the  right  of  taxing. 
I  consider  this  Bill  as  a  bill  of  pains  and  penalties,  for  it 
begins  with  a  crime,  and  ends  with  a  punishment ;  but  I 
wish  gentlemen  would  consider,  whether  it  is  more  proper 
to  govern  by  military  force,  or  by  management. 

Mr.  Attorney  General  Tliurlow.  The  form  of  the 
present  law  was  adopted  to  give  magistracy  that  degree  of 
authority  which  it  ought  to  be  vested  with  for  the  execu- 
tion of  the  laws  ;  but  this  Bill  carries  with  it  no  degree  of 
severity,  unless  the  pleasure  of  disobeying  is  greater  than 
that  of  the  punishment.  To  say  that  we  have  a  right  to 
tax  America,  and  never  to  exercise  that  right,  is  redicu- 
lous,  and  a  man  must  abuse  his  own  understanding  very 
much  not  to  allow  of  that  right.  To  procure  the  tax 
by  requisition  is  a  most  ridiculous  absurdity,  while  the 
sovereignty  remains  in  this  country ;  and  the  right  of 
taxing  was  nevei'  in  the  least  given  up  to  the  Americans. 
Their  charter  is  mere  matter  of  legislative  power ;  and 
whoever  looks  into  that  charter,  will  see  that  no  power 
whatever  was  meant  to  be  given  them  so  as  to  controwl 
the  right  of  taxation  from  Great  Britain. 

Mr.  E.  Burke.  I  have  little  to  say.  Sir,  with  hopes  to 
convince  the  House,  but  what  I  have  to  offer,  1  shall 
do  with  freedom.  It  has  been  asserted,  that  the  nation 
is  not  alarmed,  that  no  petitions  of  discontent  are  received. 
How  can  persons  complain,  when  sufficient  time  is  not 
given  them  to  know  what  you  are  about  ?  We  have  now 
seen  the  whole  of  this  great  work  ;  1  wish  all  was  good 
that  it  contained.  I  am  afraid  a  long  series  of  labours  and 
troubles  will  succeed.  The  question  that  is  before  you 
is  a  great  one ;  it  is  no  less  than  the  proscription  of 
provinces,  and  cities,  and  nations,  upon  their  trial ;  except 
that  when  the  saints  of  God  are  to  judge  the  world  I  do 
not  know  one  of  greater  importance.  I  will  endeavour 
to  comply  with  the  temper  of  the  House,  and  be  short 
in  what  1  have  to  offer.  [The  HoUse  being  noisy,  several 
members  going  out,  soon  after  which  he  got  up  and  said,] 
I  find.  Sir,  I  have  got  my  voice,  and  I  shall  beat  down 
the  noise  of  the  House.  Why  did  I  compromise  ?  [Here 
he  produced  the  letters  from  Ijord  Hillsborough  to  the 
Americans,  which  declared,  that  his  Majesty,  or  his  Mini.«;- 
ters,  had  not  any  intention  of  laying  any  further  taxes  on 
Amenca.]  He  dwelt  some  considerable  time  on  the 
words  which  the  letter  contained,  as  a  sort  of  declaration 
to  the  Americans  that  they  should  not  be  taxed.  If  you 
govern  America  at  all.  Sir,  it  must  be  by  an  army ;  but 
the  Bill  before  us,  cairies  with  it  the  force  of  that  army  ; 
and  1  am  of  opinion,  they  never  will  consent  without  force 
being  used.  1  have  to  protest  against  this  Bill,  because 
you  refuse  to  bear  tlie  parties  aggrieved.     Consider  what 


»r 


BILL  FOR  GOVERNMENT  OF  MASSACHUSETTS  BAY. 


92 


von  are  doing,  when  you  are  taking  tlic  trial  over  the 
Atlantic  seas,  three  thousand  miles  to  Great  Britain ;  wit- 
nesses may  be  subpoened,  and  called  upon  by  tlie  prisoner, 
as  many  as  lie  ])leases.  Let  me,  for  Clod's  sake,  wish  that 
gentlemen  would  think  a  little  more  that  a  fair  trial  may 
be  had  in  America ;  and  tiiat  while  the  King  appoints  the 
Judge,  there  is  a  degree  of  fairness  that  People  should  the 
Jury.  Repeal,  Sir,  the  Act  which  gave  rise  to  this 
liisturbance  ;  this  will  be  the  remedy  to  bring  peace  and 
quietness,  and  restore  authority ;  but  a  crcat  bluck  book, 
and  a  great  many  red  coats,  will  never  he  able  to  govern 
it.  It  is  tnie,  the  Americans  cannot  resist  llic  force  of 
this  country,  but  it  will  cause  wranglings,  scuffling,  and 
discontent.  Such  remedies  as  the  foregoing,  will  make 
such  disturbances  as  are  not  to  be  quieted. 

Lord  iWorth  arose  to  answer  Mr.  Burke.  He  desired 
leave  to  look  at  Ixird  Hillshormgh's  letter,  as  he  had 
not  a  copy  of  it ;  and  explained  tlie  passages  in  that 
letter  very' different  from  what  Mr.  Burke  had:  he  read 
the  words,  "  That  neither  the  King,  or  any  of  his  Minis- 
ters, wished  to  tax  America."  His  Ixjrdship  observed, 
Tiiat  this  was  not  an  expression  that  carried  with  it  a 
denial  of  the  right,  but  only  a  wish  that  no  further  taxes 
"  should  be  laid  on."  A  man,  says  he,  is  not  factious, 
that  says  America  may  be  taxed ;  tlie  letter  contains  an 
opinion,  that  no  further  taxes,  at  that  time,  ought  to 
be  laid.  I  am  sorry  to  hear  a  charge  thrown  out,  that 
these  proceedings  are  to  deprive  persons  of  their  natural 
right.  Let  me  ask  of  what  natural  right,  whether  that 
of  smugslins,  or  of  throwing  tea  overboard  ?  Or  of  another 
natural  right,  wliich  is  not  paying  their  debts  ?  But  surely 
this  Bill  does  not  destroy  any  of  their  civil  rigiits  ?  You 
have  given  them  a  Civil  Magistrate  and  a  Council,  which 
they  had  not  before ;  you  have  given  the  innocent  man 
a  fair  trial  in  some  Colony  or  other ;  and  if  he  cannot 
get  a  fair  trial  in  that  country,  the  whole  being  in  a 
distempered  state  of  disturbance  and  opposition  to  the 
laws  of  the  mother  country,  then,  in  that  case,  and  in 
that  only,  he  must  be  sent  to  Great  Britain.  All  that 
these  Acts  profess  to  do,  is  to  restore  some  order  to  the 
Province.  None  thai  admit  the  least  degree  of  sovereignty, 
can  possibly  deny  the  provision  of  this  Bill ;  it  is  not 
a  military  Government  that  is  established,  but  the  altera- 
tion of  a  civil  one.  1  am  sure  that  this  is  adopted  as  the 
best  method  at  present ;  I  do  not  say  it  wjU  succeed,  but 
I  hope  for  the  good  consequences  of  it ;  and  if  the 
Massachusetts  Bay  is  to  be  governed  by  management, 
this  is  the  only  remedy.  By  what  means  is  authority 
to  be  maintained,  but  by  establishing  that  authority  from 
Parliament  ?  1  do  not  know,  Sir,  what  is  the  proper  time 
to  lay  a  fresh  tax  on  America ;  but  this  I  know,  that  this 
is  net  the  proper  time  to  repeal  one.  We  are  now  to 
establish  our  authority,  or  give  it  up  entirely  ;  when  they 
are  quiet,  and  return  to  their  duty,  we  shall  be  kind, 
whether  by  repealing  this  tax,  or  what  not,  I  cannot 
tell;  but  this  1  will  answer,  that  when  they  are  quiet, 
and  have  a  respect  for  their  mother  country,  their  mother 
country  will  be  good-natured  to  them. 

Sir  George  Savile.  I  shall  say  not  a  word  of  preface 
at  this  late  hour ;  I  do  not  hold  it  improper  to  take  this 
into  consideration  in  a  legislative  ca])acity,  in  ])reference 
to  a  judicial  one ;  but  I  hold  this  to  be  i  principle  of 
justice,  that  a  charter  which  conveys  a  sacred  right,  ought 
not  to  be  taken  away  without  hearing  the  parties,  either 
in  a  judicial  or  legislative  way,  which  has  not  been  done, 
but  from  their  own  declaration  in  the  papers  on  the 
table,  and  which  I,  in  my  mind,  do  not  think  sufficient 
evidence. 

Then  the  House  divided: 
Yeas,  239  ;  Yays,  64. 

So  it  was  resolved  in  tlie  Affirmative: 

And   the  Bill  was  accordingly  read  the  third  time. 

And  after  several  amendments  were  made,  the  Bill  was 
Piissed. 

Ordered,  That  Mr.  Cooper  do  carry  the  Bill  to  the 
Lords,  and  desire  their  concurrence. 

Thursday,  May  12,  lTt4. 

The  Bill  was  returned  from  the  House  o